Sunday's Well, Cork City, Co. Cork

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Where: 2 Connaught Ave, The Lough, Cork, Ireland

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When: Unknown

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
We are staying in the "Rebel County" today, just because it is a good thing to do. I believe all Corkonians will agree with the decision to present this wonderful landscape / cityscape.

I am not very good on sports, where is swordscookie when you need him? Probably off somewhere nice enjoying the Sun! If he was here he might explain why rugby and Sunday's Well seem linked in my mind?

Though labelled "Sunday's Well" (and the foreground certainly includes much of that area of the northside of Cork), the consensus from contributors to this image is that it was taken from off Donovan's Road on the south side. Perhaps from Connaught Avenue, but certainly across the Western Road and taking in the city entrance to UCC....


Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Catalogue range c.1865-1914. Likely after 1902 (bridge)

NLI Ref: L_ROY_00288

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 6944
sundayswell corkcity cocork robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio thelawrencephotographcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland donovansbridge riverlee mountstjoseph goodshepherdconvent ucc universitycollegecork connaghtavenue westernroad suttonscoals

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  • profile

    CASSIDY PHOTOGRAPHY

    • 18/Apr/2018 06:54:16

    I guess Robert French did not own a carpenter's spirit level. Note the roof line of the distant building is sloped. I am sure it was not built in the style of Pisa. Sometimes the simplest tool from a hardware store and without a photographic brand name can be used to improve photography. A spirit level is just one item.

  • profile

    domenico milella

    • 18/Apr/2018 07:23:58

    Congratulation for your beautiful Album.

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 18/Apr/2018 08:00:41

    It's a shame the smaller posters on the right are not clearer, I am sure that the solution to the date of this photo lies within.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 18/Apr/2018 08:06:12

    Sundays Well have a very well established Swimming Club (since 1924).

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    Oretani Wildlife (Mike Grimes)

    • 18/Apr/2018 08:07:11

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/cassidyphotography] C'mere now boy, here in da reaaal capital of Ireland we have all de angles you know. Spirit levels are fur langars!

  • profile

    CASSIDY PHOTOGRAPHY

    • 18/Apr/2018 08:11:33

    Mike Grimes cassidyphotography.net C'mere now boy, here in da reaaal capital of Ireland we have all de angles you know. Spirit levels are fur langars! "fur langars"? I am not conversant in ebonics.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 18/Apr/2018 08:18:56

    I think Mr French / Lawrence was up near this cross in Connaght Avenue - the "sloping" building and the building in front (a convent?) seem to line up - goo.gl/maps/AEpUwnVbpgC2

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    Oretani Wildlife (Mike Grimes)

    • 18/Apr/2018 08:33:15

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] I'd have to agree. That is the bridge at Donovans Rd. and the entrance to UCC. It has all changed so much. The dirt path is now O'Donovan Rossa Rd.

  • profile

    abandoned railways

    • 18/Apr/2018 08:37:46

    The lodge and bridge are shown here. OSI map maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V2,566397,571535,12,9

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    Oretani Wildlife (Mike Grimes)

    • 18/Apr/2018 08:39:37

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/cassidyphotography] Never mind. Perhaps someday when you visit Cork and hear the accent and some of the local slang, which incidentally has nothing to do with ebonics, you will understand.

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    abandoned railways

    • 18/Apr/2018 08:44:07

    Plaque on Dononans Bridge. "1902 Donovan's Bridge Presented to the Citizens of Cork by Thomas Donovan Fernhurst Rt Hon Edward Fitzgerald Lord Mayor Augustine Roch Esq High Sheriff WH Hill & Son Engineers Patrick Murphy Builder"

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    Oretani Wildlife (Mike Grimes)

    • 18/Apr/2018 08:49:12

    Some info about Suttons Coals, which doesn't help with dating. charliedaly.com/ancestors/ppl/c/b/bfbdbe9b3fe4191c3e72c77... www.facebook.com/sailingmerchantvessels/posts/88933427114...

  • profile

    CASSIDY PHOTOGRAPHY

    • 18/Apr/2018 08:53:55

    Mike Grimes cassidyphotography.net Never mind. Perhaps someday when you visit Cork and hear the accent and some of the local slang, which incidentally has nothing to do with ebonics, you will understand. Been there, done that, August 1977. And, I used to fly into windy Cork many year later. Postscript: Living in Spain, I assumed you're "black Irish".

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    abandoned railways

    • 18/Apr/2018 08:58:49

    John Windele's (previous picture) inscribed stones ended up in UCC.

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    PADTECTWO

    • 18/Apr/2018 10:30:45

    Very interesting donovan road on street view.

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    abandoned railways

    • 18/Apr/2018 11:44:48

    www.google.com/maps/@51.8951151,-8.4888057,3a,75y,336.95h...

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 18/Apr/2018 13:32:07

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikeegee] I looked up the Rugby thing myself to find Sunday’s Well Rugby Club was founded in 1906, by a group of choir and altar boys from St Vincent’s Church, in the parish on the Northside of Cork City, from which the club derives its name.The Club reformed in the 1910/1911 season. Is that the Church you were baptised in? I was surprised to learn that Rugby was the game chosen by Choir and Alter boys!!

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 18/Apr/2018 13:50:45

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/cassidyphotography] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikeegee] Where did the salutation Langar originate from?

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    Niall McAuley

    • 18/Apr/2018 13:54:39

    The commonly-believed story (no idea if it is true) is that the Munster Fusiliers returned from India with the habit of calling people after these guys: Langhur monkey

  • profile

    CASSIDY PHOTOGRAPHY

    • 18/Apr/2018 14:05:11

    Well, it is not Irish. And, the dictionary has one reference. langar |ˈlʌŋgər| noun Indian (among Sikhs) a communal free kitchen. • a communal meal. ORIGIN from Hindi.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 18/Apr/2018 16:07:28

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/cassidyphotography] You learn something new everyday! (around here anyway)

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    Scenes from the life of a double monster

    • 19/Apr/2018 07:04:29

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikeegee] wow, the entrance to UCC used to be so cute

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 19/Apr/2018 07:32:54

    More Cork slang - www.corkpastandpresent.ie/cultureincork/corkslang/ Langer (i) Agitated, irritating, and obnoxious person. (Term reputedly brought back from India to Cork by the Munster Fusiliers who, while based in India, viewed the langur monkey as an irritating creature. Sample phrase: ‘Go way ya langer’. (ii) Penis (possibly related to the langur monkey which has a very long tail — up to 40 inches)

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    Oretani Wildlife (Mike Grimes)

    • 19/Apr/2018 10:21:20

    The term langer in Cork is used to describe irritating people, eejits or can also be used when talking to friends. "He's a right langer, he stole my pint!" or "Would you look at that langer trying to balance a pint on his head" "Erra go on out of that ya langer, let me buy you another pint." I only spelt it as it is pronounced, similar to the way perhaps the Trainspotting or Forrest Gump books are written. And no I'm not what might be called Black Irish, at keast I don't think so. You find more of them in Galway than in Cork which is where I am from.

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    Oretani Wildlife (Mike Grimes)

    • 19/Apr/2018 10:23:53

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] Yes, and my father and his brother were both altar boys in St.Vincents, the latter enjoyed playing rugby! I was quite sad to hear it had closed.

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    Oretani Wildlife (Mike Grimes)

    • 19/Apr/2018 10:45:38

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] I didn't know that. Interesting how Irish soldiers also brought back another term, Baluba (after the central African Baluba ethnic group), from their peacekeeping mission in the Congo in the 1960's which could mean an idiot or foolish person. My granny from Dublin used to say, "Ya big Baluba!" whenever we bumped our heads off the table, fell down the stairs, spilt milk, unravelled her knitting, etc.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 20/Apr/2018 00:22:55

    Thanks all! I've kept the langers and balubas out of the description - but tried to capture the main location and dating nuggets :)

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    Dr. Ilia

    • 27/Apr/2018 08:00:04

    Beautiful

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    guliolopez

    • 13/May/2018 23:37:31

    Was up in Cork CIty Gaol earlier today - helpfully highlighted by [https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikeegee] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/abandonedrailsireland] in this photo. A temporary exhibition in the gaol, focused around Constance Markievicz and her enforced "stay" in Cork, uses this Lawrence photo as a kind of "what the area looked like at the time" type illustration.