Close-up of doorway of large, cruciform, modern romanesque church (is Sligo Cathedral)

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Where: Teach Trasna, John St, Abbeyquarter North, Sligo, Ireland

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When: Unknown

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
A double image of a double door in a church somewhere in Ireland. Given the extreme age of the stereo pairs collection some of the images, such as this one, are remarkably clear and 'new' looking!

Early collaboration from B-59 and BeachcomberAustralia identified this as Sligo Cathedral. As the cathedral opened in 1874, it seems likely this image dates to the mid- or late-1870s at the earliest. As well as helping identify the subjects of the "high relief" work in the tympanum today's other eagle-eyed contributors point out that this image is actually mirrored from reality....


Photographers: Frederick Holland Mares, James Simonton

Contributor: John Fortune Lawrence

Collection: Stereo Pairs Photograph Collection

Date: Catalogue range c.1860-1883. Though definitely after 1874.

NLI Ref: STP_2407

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 10040
thestereopairsphotographcollection lawrencecollection stereographicnegatives jamessimonton frederickhollandmares johnfortunelawrence williammervynlawrence nationallibraryofireland romanesquedoubledoor church catholicchurch cobblestones sligocathedral sligo cathedral cathedraloftheimmaculateconception templestreet portico tympanum relief mirrorview highrelief flipped locationidentified

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  • profile

    B-59

    • 14/Nov/2016 09:00:31

    Seems to be the doorway of this church: catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000565725

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 14/Nov/2016 09:17:41

    Sligo ! Cathedral of St. Mary the Virgin and St. John the Baptist, Sligo

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 14/Nov/2016 09:20:16

    SNAP-ish - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000338759 Edit - better likeness - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000323426

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    sharon.corbet

    • 14/Nov/2016 09:21:26

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] The NIAH calls it Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception and mentions that it was consecrated in 1875.

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    B-59

    • 14/Nov/2016 09:22:49

    Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Sligo en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cathedral_of_the_Immaculate_Concept...

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    mikescottnz

    • 14/Nov/2016 09:23:54

    Wasn't 'Romanesque' more often called 'Norman' in Ireland, Wales & England ? The only Norman styled cathedral in Ireland ?

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 14/Nov/2016 09:24:58

    Whereas the DIA calls it the Cathedral of St. Mary.

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    B-59

    • 14/Nov/2016 09:35:30

    sligocathedral.ie/ has 'Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception' as well.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 14/Nov/2016 09:36:06

    Apparently it got a name change at some point, as the 25" OSI calls it St. Mary's as well.

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    domenico milella

    • 14/Nov/2016 09:40:54

    Congratulation for your beautiful Album.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 14/Nov/2016 09:42:11

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Apologies if I got the name wrong. I was going by this site - placeandsee.com/s?as=foto&fp=51707755 - which does not now look 100% reliable. The thrill of the chase and all that ...!

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 14/Nov/2016 09:47:21

    So probably 1874 at earliest...

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 14/Nov/2016 09:48:51

    Flickr amazes me again - in 2014 [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/14912090110/]

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    B-59

    • 14/Nov/2016 09:53:44

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] no problem... good sleuthing anyway!

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    B-59

    • 14/Nov/2016 09:55:58

    and in 2013: www.flickr.com/photos/luvbughcj/8685312594/

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    j.coffey78

    • 14/Nov/2016 10:33:22

    Thats great work folks, another mystery solved.

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 14/Nov/2016 11:51:58

    No one seems to have noticed that this Stereo Pair needs to be reversed,mirrored and flipped.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 14/Nov/2016 12:03:31

    Anyone got a link to a description of the scene depicted? Mary is in the middle, in the Garden of Eden with the serpent, Adam and Eve kneeling, a reference to Mary as the "second Eve". Three bishops and a Pope, all seemingly interested in books?

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 14/Nov/2016 12:18:14

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] No idea, but whist investigating. I found this - ... The arch over the main entrance has a series of scriptural figures sculpted in ‘alto rellevo’. The three-faced clock tower, designed by Gillet & Bland of London in 1877, is one of the finest examples of a nineteenth-century turret clock, and the carillon, comprising nine bells, has few comparable to it in Ireland. ... From sligocathedral.ie/about-us/parish-history/ Which implies the photo is post 1877 as the clock is evident in [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]]'s first comment link catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000565725 (showing 14:22). Not too outrageous to suggest they were taken on the same day? Clockmakers - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gillett_%26_Johnston

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 14/Nov/2016 12:21:44

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Bien descrito !

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    Niall McAuley

    • 14/Nov/2016 12:24:52

    Leo Alphonso Milligan, father of the late lamented Spike, was christened here.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 14/Nov/2016 12:30:14

    I think the chubby lad in the triple crown is Pope Pius IX, who was Pope until 1878, and defined the doctrine of the Immaculate Conception after which the Cathedral is now named.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 14/Nov/2016 12:37:19

    I suspect that the man back-to-back with Adam might be Saint/Bishop Bonaventure, another Marian enthusiast, who originated the Angelus. The two beardy individuals would be from further back in history? Hmm, no help in the art in the Room of the Immaculate Conception, too many people depicted there to help with this one.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 14/Nov/2016 12:48:38

    "alto rellevo" should be alto relievo, "high relief", where more than half the sculpted figure projects.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 14/Nov/2016 12:53:37

    Excellent (and speedy) sleuthing - by [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] and [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] in particular. We can't keep up most of the time. Other than "applause from the gallery", (and a giggle at the "high relief" that this one was identified), all I can really offer is a small nugget courtesy of my Leaving Cert Art and Art History. That the proper name for this type of architectural element is a typmanum. From the original Latin meaning "decorated archy bit over a door" :) Or "drum". Also, well spotted by [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] on the mirroring of the image. We won't flip it here - but will be sure to make a note of it :)

  • profile

    B-59

    • 14/Nov/2016 13:02:22

    I think the four men are the evangelists (therefore the books) (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Evangelists)

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 14/Nov/2016 13:48:34

    she opened in 1874, so the date is no earlier than that. This would be still new when it was taken, under 10 yrs old anyway. Norman-style architecture, from Normandy in France. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norman_architecture#Neo-Norman