Health Offices, Dublin City, Co. Dublin

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Where: 4 Cork Hill, Dublin, Ireland

Try to find the spot where the photographer was standing.

When: Unknown

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
While this beautifully ornate building is familiar to me I would never have known it as the "Health Offices"! Finding it on Streetview shouldn't take too long in any event!

And indeed B-59 had linked the Streetview in a flash - with details on the building itself quick to follow. As per the various notes in the comments, this building (formerly the Newcomen Bank) would be known to most Dubliners as the city Rates Office (rather than the Health Office it clearly was at the time of this image). The original bank building was to the left, with an entrance on Castle Street. First opened in the 1780s, it was significantly extended in 1856 and 1884 - with an entire new double frontage added as we see here on Cork Hill. While this certainly dates from after the 1880s remodeling, we are still hopeful of refining the date further (possibly if we can find out when building's use changed from municipal health office, and to the rates office it is known as today....)


Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Catalogue range c.1865-1914. Though certainly after 1886, and possibly before c.1899.

NLI Ref: L_CAB_04747

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 7784
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio thelawrencephotographcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland healthoffices dublin ireland ornate fountain lordedwardstreet drinkingfountain ratesoffice corkhill damestreet thomasivory

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  • profile

    AndyBrii

    • 15/Dec/2016 08:28:58

    Lord Edward Street AD 1886 proudly carved into the wall niche, and a youth tarries near the water fountain below .

  • profile

    B-59

    • 15/Dec/2016 08:36:18

    "Designed by the architect Thomas Ivory in 1781, the former Newcomen Bank is now in use as a Rates office." archiseek.com/2010/1781-newcomen-bank-lord-edward-street-...

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    B-59

    • 15/Dec/2016 08:50:55

    The 'Dictionary of national biography', vol. XXIX, 1892, p. 84 says: "The building is now the public health office." archive.org/stream/dictionaryofnati29stepuoft#page/n97/mo...

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    B-59

    • 15/Dec/2016 09:09:09

    According to openhousedublin.com/index.php/tour/rates-office-former-ne..., the building was doubled in length on Cork Hill by an 1862 addition.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 15/Dec/2016 09:50:50

    So which was the original half - left or right ?

  • profile

    robinparkes

    • 15/Dec/2016 09:55:03

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] I would say the right judging by the state of the window reveals on the top storey and comparing them with those on the left.

  • profile

    B-59

    • 15/Dec/2016 10:16:58

    'Temple Bar: A History' by Maurice Curtis says that the left side is the older one (and gives 1866 for the addition) books.google.com/books?id=ridLDAAAQBAJ&pg=PT127&l... See also - maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V2,715343,734024,12,9 and - maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V2,715343,734024,11,7

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 15/Dec/2016 10:57:00

    DIA entry for the 1862 works.

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    guliolopez

    • 15/Dec/2016 13:42:51

    I thought it looked especially "rejuvenated" in the 2015 StreetView that [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] provided. I guess these works in a 2014 Streetview explain why...

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 15/Dec/2016 15:18:16

    Building next door to the right today is missing, but the Carnegie Centre is from the 1920s, no help with dates. Behind the building to the left of shot is some wall of Dublin castle (behind the Bedford tower) which is gone/different now. Change is visible between the 25" and modern OSI map.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 15/Dec/2016 21:41:06

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] I think the plaque has something to do with Mr Sullivan being Lord Mayor in 1886-7. ?? Flickr can sometimes be amazing - in 2015 [https://www.flickr.com/photos/andrea_battini/21084656326/] The staircase - [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/10100293215/] And the water fountain - [https://www.flickr.com/photos/thetaipanofhongkong/15455840349/]

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 16/Dec/2016 01:23:29

    Re. outer date. I would have imagined we'd see the overhead tram wires had this photograph been taken after 4 September 1899 when the #21 line from Westland Row to Inchicore was electrified. The tracks would have been just out of shot bottom right above..... as they can be seen close to the curved curb in this picture of Cityhall across the road. catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000040886

  • profile

    indian59

    • 16/Dec/2016 03:31:55

    The City dispensary was situated just up the hill on Castle street.I believe the image of citizens queueing for bread there within one of your NLI collections[which is reversed negative-i.e. wrong way around]shows the dispensary[possibly where the 'health offices'title derive from.[?].This one dated 1897 shows the frontage of the building,viewed towards Dame street/City hall to right,out of view. www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/31672605045/in/datepos...

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 16/Dec/2016 09:29:19

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] I agree about the tram wires - definitely would be visible if present.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 16/Dec/2016 09:50:12

    The dirt level looks very similar in this archive shot which includes this building, the Castle gate and City Hall. Here we can see that the Castle wall I referred to as changed above is in fact the Bedford Tower building itself. Archiseek says In recent years, the Upper Yard has been restored – the attic story, which was added in the 1820s, was removed from the Bedford Tower, restoring its original proportions.

  • profile

    indian59

    • 16/Dec/2016 14:31:49

    The tram tracks dated from a much earlier time,when the Inchicore tram was horse drawn.This aspect towards Christchurch shows how wide the original street was pre revamp. www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/30870602243/in/datepos...

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 17/Dec/2016 00:25:47

    Thanks [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] and guys - have update the "date" label slightly to reflect. (Not sounding the date klaxon just yet though... :) )

  • profile

    indian59

    • 17/Dec/2016 07:47:22

    There was a history of health services buildings, along both Castle street dispensary/Lord Edward street, right up to the present day[Public health nurse services/HSE, occupy no's 21-25 Lord Edward street,where a scheme of c.1970s era I can recall occupied same stretch of housing, and gave 'free milk for infants'.This view towards City hall of a queue formed by citizens, paying their respects to Michael Collins in August of '22, show some of the buildings uphill of the 'Health Centre' already demolished,in part. www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/30853136274/in/datepos...