A whole lot of bull!

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Where: Curraghmore House, Curraghmore, Portlaw, Co. Waterford, Ireland

When: Unknown

In line with the many terrible puns scattered about like cow manure yesterday, we have the real thing today - a bull! While he is clearly a handsome beast with a fine set of horns, at the end of the day, he is just another married man with a ring controlling him.

Whether the Mr Glennine (or Glennie) who commissioned this Poole shot is the man in the bowler or not, as sharon.corbet suggests, it seems he was "land steward" at the Curraghmore Estate in the 1900s/1910s. Niall McAuley tells us that Curraghmore house and estate (which we have visited before and to which we've mapped this image) is still in the De Poer family. Dún Laoghaire Micheál provides some more information on the house and family in the comments below....


Photographer: A. H. Poole

Collection: Poole Photographic Studio, Waterford

Date: c.1901-1954 (likely early decades of this range)

NLI Ref: POOLEWP 0911a

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 9176
ahpoole arthurhenripoole poolecollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland bull nosering man handler waterford doors latch curraghmore cattle glennine glennie landsteward delapoer curraghmoreestate tarbh lepoer bowlerhat

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  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 20/Dec/2016 08:57:42

    John Glennine/Glennie was the Land Steward at Curraghnore in both 1901 and 1911.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Dec/2016 09:19:30

    Curraghmore on the 25", it is the Demesne of the De la Poers.

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    RETRO STU

    • 20/Dec/2016 09:25:22

    Wonder what's the breed?

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    domenico milella

    • 20/Dec/2016 09:34:05

    Congratulation for your beautiful Album.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Dec/2016 10:00:44

    [https:[email protected]] All black, maybe an Angus? Kerry?

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 20/Dec/2016 10:18:11

    Waterford Museum has a photo of another Curraghmore bull.

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    CASSIDY PHOTOGRAPHY

    • 20/Dec/2016 10:38:34

    Notice the fellow has his trousers rolled up.

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    swordscookie back and trying to catch up!

    • 20/Dec/2016 10:45:48

    In comparison with todays champions this fellow would be a featherweight! Great shot by Arthur Henri!

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    j.coffey78

    • 20/Dec/2016 11:58:19

    "José Glennie" tarbhchomhraiceoir.

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 20/Dec/2016 13:38:17

    apparently it's bad joke week here at NLI flickr. No bull!

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 20/Dec/2016 13:42:46

    how now brown cow? watch your step sir, gets a little messy near the end...

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    RETRO STU

    • 20/Dec/2016 18:43:55

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] Thanks Niall, but don't think it an Angus or a Kerry. It's not a Hereford either.

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    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 20/Dec/2016 22:43:57

    I'm no Vet and admittedly my eyesight is not as good as it was but where's the evidence that excludes this beast being a bullock?

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    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 20/Dec/2016 23:18:11

    But back to serious business, was "Curragmore" & "Gurteen Le Poer" one and the same?

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    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 20/Dec/2016 23:22:07

    This from the Evening Press, Monday 17th June 1963 "The Stately Homes of Ireland D.F. Moore Gurteen Le Poer WHERE the Suir curls round the foothills of the Comeraghs outside Clonmel, there's a place so happily named it woos the ear as it wins the eye. Gurteen Le Poer they call it ... a soft and lovely-sounding.title for any Irish home. To view it in its twentieth-century serenity, little would one suspect that this was a nest of "outlaws," and that a king's writ still runs against its occupier with undiminished severity. Yet it shelters the twentieth titular Baron Le Poer and Coraghmore whose hereditary title dates from 1535, and whose claim to the distinction is a family trust. For over 250 years it has been handed down from father to son, all through penal times, and right up to 1963. A divided Ireland was reeling under the impact of Strongbow when the first Le Poer won land and distinction here as a mail-clad Norman knight. And a few miles from Tramore his son, John, built Dunhill Castle, which later figured grimly in Cromwellian reprisals. For before its beleaguered walls its master, captured at his neighbouring castle of Kilmeadon, was hanged in full view of his wife as she hurled defiance at his captors. But long before Dunhill succumbed to Cromwell it had fathered branches of the Le Poers at Dunbratyn, Kilmeadon, Rathgormock and Curraghmore. At the last-named place, in 1535, Sir Richard Power became Baron Le Power and Coraghmore, and acknowledged head of a widespread sept. Always staunch supporters of the House of Stuart, the family was further honoured when the sixth Baron was created Viscount Decies and Earl of Tyrone by Charles II. Not for long, however, were they to enjoy their new-won distinction, for with the fall of the Stuarts the Jacobite Earl was declared an outlaw, and died a prisoner in the Tower of London. His son, exempted from the outlawry, died in 1704, and direct succession ended. Then began the extraordinary dispute which was to persist until the present century. A daughter of the last holder of the title Lady Katherine Power married Sir Marcus Beresford. So successfully did they press their claims that Sir Marcus was named first Earl of Tyrone in a new creation, and 43 years later their son became the Marquis of Waterford. Never for a moment, however, did the male line of the Power family relinquish its claim to the succession. By' 1757 it had devolved on Edmond Power of Gurteen, and down through the years it passed from father to son to the present occupier. Meanwhile a later Edmond Power of Gurteen re-assumed the original family name of De La Poer in 1863. and was created the first Count De La Poer of the Papal States. There matters rested until 1922, when the father of the present Count took the case to the House of Lords. The resulting judgment established that by right of inheritance and unbroken successions the Barony of Le Power and Coraghmore belonged to the Gurteen family. But the outlawry of the seventeenth century still existed, and debarred them from succeeding. Present-day claimant to the Barony is Count Edmond Robert Arnold de Poer, twentieth titular Baron, who in 1937 married Rosemary Anne Capel Miers. The names he bears are all of long standing in the De La Poer family, and one of the first to be called Arnold figured prominently in Ireland's medieval history. By designating Maurice Butler "a rhymer" he precipitated disturbances throughout the country, and he figured notably in the Kilkenny witch trial. It was in 1334 that Dame Alice Kyteler was accused of indulging in witchcraft and poisoning her four husbands. The charge failed, but a subsequent accusation of heresy proved more successful, and she was condemned to be burned at the stakes. As Seneschal (or Steward) of Kilkenny, Arnold de la Poer interfered on her behalf, only to be accused of the same offence and con¬fined in Dublin Castle where he died before coming to trial. Yet another link with Kilkenny was established by intermarriage between the Gurteen family and the Powers of Kilfane. Richard Power of Kilfane was the moving spirit of the theatricals which enlivened Kilkenny between 1802 and 1819, and his brother, John, founded the famous Kilkenny Hounds. But possibly the most outstanding personality associated with Gurteen La Poer was the eloquent Richard Lalor Sheil, whose second marriage was contracted with the widow of its one-time owner. By some he was considered a "career" politician, but he contributed significantly to the cause of Catholic Emancipation, and his oratory won the day for O'Connell in the Clare election. In 1846 one speech by Sheil resulted in the fall of Sir Robert Peel's Government, and the Irish-: man's appointment under the new ministry as Master of the Mint. He died as British Ambassador to the court of Tuscany in 1851, and his body was brought back in a man o' war for burial at Long Orchard in Co. Tipperary. As it stands today, Gurteen Le Poer was designed in the middle of the last century by Samuel Roberts, brother of Field Marshal Lord Roberts. It is the third residence to be built for the Le Poer family on an estate which is as storied as it is beautiful.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 21/Dec/2016 01:36:45

    Thanks all! Map, description, etc all updated :)

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    Niall McAuley

    • 21/Dec/2016 06:03:08

    [https:[email protected]] Gurteen Le Poer near Clonmel is another big house, here on the 25"

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    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 22/Dec/2016 11:15:22

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] Thanks for that. My g-grand-Uncle was a Chauffeur, and later a Steward, at Gurteen Le Poer c1930-1940