Westmoreland Street (looking to O'Connell Bridge, including a tram), Dublin City, Co. Dublin

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Where: Westmoreland St, Dublin, Ireland

When: Unknown

This lovely shot of Westmoreland Street from a high viewpoint is from the Eason Collection, and is todays offering. It even includes a tram, or so the cataloguer says, but I can see a couple of others nearer the bridge. No bazaars or arcades here - but lots of people and modes of transport!

As location was already confirmed, much of the discussion (below) on this image centered on the date. The lower-end of the catalogue range (1900) seems about right - though Clery's and the Imperial Hotel signage in the distance might indicate a date after 1902. The upper-end of the range (1939) was definitively lowered - to 1916. As much of this streetscape (and not least the Dublin Bread Company building clearly visible) were destroyed during the events of Easter week 1916....


Photographer: Unknown

Collection: Eason Photographic Collection

Date: Catalogue range c.1900-1939. Though certainly before Easter 1916.

NLI Ref: EAS_1767

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 12471
eason easonson easoncollection easonphotographiccollection glassnegative 20thcentury nationallibraryofireland westmorelandstreet dublin oconnellbridge oconnellst collegestreet trinitycollege trams horses carts pylons pedestrians cyclists traffic dublinbreadcompany stubbsgazette publicconvenience fleetstreet statue saintandrewschambers thomasmoorestatue oceanchambers

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  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 09/Feb/2017 09:04:47

    Previously: Horse-drawn Omnibus, Westmoreland Street, Dublin Coral and Copper Snow

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 09/Feb/2017 09:07:43

    This is later than the Coral Snow shot - the swan necked lights no longer have glass globes, but strange danglers.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 09/Feb/2017 09:15:01

    The danglers are 1920-23 according to our favourite reference on Dublin Street Lighting from archiseek

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 09/Feb/2017 09:15:21

    Taken from no. 7 Front Square, by the look of it.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 09/Feb/2017 09:59:47

    On those lights, I see both kinds - danglers near and globes far. So I think this is in the period 1920-23.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 09/Feb/2017 10:06:14

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] Is it not pre-1916? The bread company still has a lid on it.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 09/Feb/2017 10:20:58

    [https:[email protected]] Good point. Archiseek essay lets us down! Rereading it, there is a pic of 1916 destruction with a dangly light in the essay itself, so the evidence was there all along. Must make a not to self - dangly lights appeared before 1916 rising.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 09/Feb/2017 10:56:13

    An interesting sign over a door at right: ST ANDREWS MEMBERS. A club? Today in streetview, it reads PROVINCIAL BANK CHAMBERS [Edit: it may have been ST ANDREWS CHAMBERS, not MEMBERS after all]

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 09/Feb/2017 11:03:05

    The DIA (with a snazzy new look!) entry on 41 Westmoreland Street says the stonework was renovated in 1911. I can't tell yet if this is pre or post.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 09/Feb/2017 11:15:24

    The Scottish Widows had more than one building called ST ANDREWS CHAMBERS, there's one in Manchester, too.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 09/Feb/2017 11:23:03

    This one (latest 1901) shows tall straight lights, no swan necks, globed or dangly. Trinity College Dublin, late 19th century

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 09/Feb/2017 11:49:20

    Clerys had work done in 1902 to include the Imperial Hotel. I see a sign for the hotel on the end of Clery's building here, and the building looks to be its 1916 size. So 1902-16?

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 09/Feb/2017 12:08:43

    Cramer Wood and Co. at #4 were a piano shop, big in the late 1800s. This building is from 1869. Reconstructed in 1931 for Fitzgerald & Co. A quick newspaper search says there were here through 1915, so no help.

  • profile

    Carol Maddock

    • 09/Feb/2017 14:29:39

    Just to let ye all know that the independent adjudicator from KPMG was in with us at the National Library this morning to preside over the awards ceremony for [https:[email protected]/]. Micheál won the caption competition a couple of weeks back. We were delighted to have a chat with him, and hope he'll make full use of the voucher for our Café Joly. This is also the lovely print of Queenstown that he chose. Micheál's great grandfather's business is advertised on the gable wall to the right. [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/27112743213/]

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 09/Feb/2017 15:30:26

    [https:[email protected]] Fix! Boo!

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    Carol Maddock

    • 09/Feb/2017 15:45:36

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] How very dare you! I'm shocked at your insinuations, shocked I tell you!

  • profile

    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 09/Feb/2017 16:32:42

    Delighted to have met all the important incumbents of Library Towers. Great programme of events coming up there too. Can't wait for the upcoming Geanealogists workshop that might solve the mystery of how my gable-end forebear managed to be married twice - on the same day - by the same Celebrant - and in two different Diocese (same denomination) and still avoid an appearance in Civil Registration.

  • profile

    guliolopez

    • 09/Feb/2017 17:17:44

    I've nothing material to add. The date range that [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] proposes (1902-1916) looks fairly solid to me. My only contributions are to spot my old office. And a very nautical looking flagpole with guy ropes - crying-out for someone to fly the ensign of the Crimson Permanent Assurance :)

  • profile

    dantheserene

    • 09/Feb/2017 18:31:55

    photogoodwin, what is the person spending a penny on?

  • profile

    beachcomberaustralia

    • 09/Feb/2017 20:53:16

    Don't mean to frighten the Flickroonies, but there is a ghostly Mysterious Lady in Black near the Fleet St intersection (see note), also seen nearby in www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/9005122884/

  • profile

    beachcomberaustralia

    • 09/Feb/2017 21:05:37

    Sometimes you just have to do it yourself! - Streetview (sort of, at ground level) - goo.gl/maps/CvDzf4aZnLR2

  • profile

    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 09/Feb/2017 23:15:15

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] Thats probably one of those Scotish Widows who just popped out of the corner office for a smoking break. The Widows were in Dublin since the 1860s scotish-widows

  • profile

    beachcomberaustralia

    • 10/Feb/2017 08:38:35

    [https:[email protected]] Ha!

  • profile

    A. P. L.

    • 10/Feb/2017 18:21:33

    Perhaps interesting to note that the underground toilets depicted in the foreground have recently been filled in as a part of the new LUAS Cross City works......!

  • profile

    Dr. Ilia

    • 22/Feb/2017 09:00:05

    Superb shot

  • profile

    Canadian Pacific

    • 23/Feb/2017 19:57:24

    What is the Ocean Chambers? I added a note and a tag in the image... hope that is OK. Feel free to remove it if it's not appropriate for me to add.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 24/Feb/2017 09:41:37

    [https:[email protected]] It is OK to leave notes and comments on any photo in the NLI stream, that is how we learn about them. But I'm afraid I have no idea what the Ocean Chambers building is about. I see a VR for Victoria Regina, so built after 1837. The DIA says 1-3 Westmoreland Street were replaced by the current brick/limestone building in 1935.

  • profile

    Canadian Pacific

    • 24/Feb/2017 15:41:49

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] Thank you Niall! This is fun! I love Ireland and visited the country in 2013. I hope to return in not too distant a future. Greetings from Toronto.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 09/Jun/2017 10:59:06

    The ball drop in the distance (see note) features in Ulysses, Episode 8, Bloom crosses O'Connell bridge heading South: Mr Bloom moved forward, raising his troubled eyes. Think no more about that. After one. Timeball on the ballastoffice is down. Dunsink time. Fascinating little book that is of sir Robert Ball's. Parallax. I never exactly understood. There's a priest. Could ask him. Par it's Greek: parallel, parallax. Later in the text, Bloom says the ball is on Greenwich time, the clock on Dunsink time, which reminds me of this one: April 29, 1907

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 10/Jun/2017 05:55:29

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] Brilliant, the things you learn around here!!!