Enniscorthy, Castleboro - river and steps

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Where: Clonroche, Wexford County, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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A big house near Enniscorthy in County Wexford taken from the level of the river. There is mention of "steps" but I cannot see them! Can you?

As confirmed by today's contributors (and indeed by Wikipedia), Castleboro House was one of the many estate houses which did not survive the 1920s intact. While I can just about make out the steps (after some prompting) in this shot, it doesn't look like they've survived either. In fact, the water feature and falls seem to be all but gone also.....


Photographer: A. H. Poole

Collection: Poole Photographic Studio, Waterford

Date: Catalogue range c.1901-1954. Definitely before 1923 (gutted by fire)

NLI Ref: POOLEWP 0483

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 5217
ahpoole arthurhenripoole poolecollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland castleboro enniscorthy countywexford ireland house river trees carew castleborohouse cowexford waterfall fishpond baroncarew ladycarew

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  • profile

    Dr. Ilia

    • 27/Nov/2018 09:00:08

    masterful capture

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 27/Nov/2018 09:00:30

    Not the river, the fish pond (25" link). The aerial shot there says it is still standing but ruined and the pond is gone. NIAH entry says it was burned down during the Troubles of 1923.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 27/Nov/2018 09:05:36

    We have not posted this link for a good few months. It will help with your comments and posting. Flickr: Allowed HTML

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 27/Nov/2018 09:11:11

    80 rooms, but no-one home bar 3 servants in 1911. Likewise 1901.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 27/Nov/2018 09:19:57

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] Surprising to see no continuity in the names of the servants from one census to the other.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 27/Nov/2018 09:20:03

    The house jumped from 34 rooms to 80 rooms between 1901 and 1911. The DIA says it was renovated in 1908.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 27/Nov/2018 09:23:45

    The steps run down from the house to the water, see L_ROY_02816

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 27/Nov/2018 09:32:41

    The owner at the time of the photo was Robert Shapland George Julian Carew, 3rd Baron Carew

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 27/Nov/2018 09:36:35

    Via Trove the remarkable story of The Dowager Lady Carew, 1798 - 1901, whose 104 years included the Ball before the Battle of Waterloo (1815) - trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/247702084 (1901)

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 27/Nov/2018 09:42:32

    Impressive greenhouse in the archive!

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 27/Nov/2018 09:58:23

    Excellent! - 'The Castleboro Lament' by Damian Cullen - youtu.be/oiWUTNEtBlA

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 27/Nov/2018 09:59:31

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] I would think you could count on the fingers of one hand the people who lived in all three of the eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth centuries. EDIT not true there seems to be over 200 people in the 1901 census who achieved the same.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 27/Nov/2018 10:27:27

    While looking at the census I found a man who reported his age in 1901 as 122 years, his wife was 90 and his Sister in law 95 - John McDonough and Family Whereas Wikipedia says that the the oldest Irish person died just short of 112 years List of Irish supercentenarians

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 27/Nov/2018 10:59:41

    Here is the 3rd Baron himself at the UK's National Portrait Gallery.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 27/Nov/2018 11:01:36

    ... and his wife, Julia Mary, Lady Carew (née Lethbridge)

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 27/Nov/2018 11:07:44

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] A tough looking man and a very pretty lady!

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 27/Nov/2018 11:28:38

    The 3rd baron died without chidren, as did his brother the 4th, so their 1st cousin became 5th. His grandson, Patrick Thomas Connolly-Carew (7th baron) represented Ireland at the Olympics in the equestian 3-day-event in 1968 and 1972!

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 27/Nov/2018 11:59:23

    Flickr is sometimes amazing! House and steps in 2014 via [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/9119190661/]

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 27/Nov/2018 14:35:41

    Form a review of Abandoned Mansions of Ireland in the London Times April 28, 2011. The author Tarquin Blake "camped out in plenty of decaying old mansions"

    Almost every house comes with a suitable Irish story. Mighty Castleboro House, in Co Wexford, faced with giant Corinthian columns, was started by its cautious owner only on the day that his heir was born in 1787 securing the succession. When it was burnt out in a chimney fire while the Carews were away, they called in an architect who suffered from gout and had to be ferried round in a wheelbarrow with plans in one hand and a bottle of wine in the other.

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    Carol Maddock

    • 27/Nov/2018 15:45:17

    From the Irish Independent of Wednesday, 7 February 1923

    HUGE DESTRUCTION Great Mansion in Ashes Castleboro', the splendid Irish residence of Lord Carew, six miles to the west of Enniscorthy, was burned to the ground on Monday night. The damage far exceeds £100,000. About 10 o'clock armed men called to the residence of the farm steward, Mr. Richardson, about a quarter of a mile from the mansion, which was unoccupied. They seized barrels of paraffin oil, which was used for machinery and other purposes, and a quantity of hay, and, proceeding to Castleboro', burst in the doors and windows. Hay saturated in paraffin was set alight through the house, and the remainder of the inflammable liquid was sprinkled all over. In a short time the flames, fanned by a high wind, had gutted the whole of the huge structure. Only three of the rooms were furnished, the remainder of the contents having been sold in May 1921.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 27/Nov/2018 17:08:27

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner] On Castleboro architect Daniel Robertson, the DIA says: In spite of his success in attracting commissions, when he was working at Powerscourt in the early 1840s he was, in the words of Lord Powerscourt, 'always in debt and…used to hide in the domes of the roof of the house' to escape the Sheriff's officers who pursued him. By then he was crippled with gout and in an advanced state of alcoholism; at Powerscourt he 'used to be wheeled out on the terrace in a wheelbarrow with a bottle of sherry, and as long as that lasted he was able to design and direct the workmen, but when the sherry was finished he collapsed and was incapable of working till the drunken fit had evaporated.