Bazaar, Blackrock, Co. Louth

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Where: Main St, Haggardstown, Co. Louth, Ireland

When: Unknown

"Bazaar" a word much used in past years and seldom seen now! An ancient Persian name for an enclosed market, the Bazaar enabled the development of cities in the ancient world. An example in Blackrock therefore might lead to hopes that it would enable the development of a metropolis? Perhaps streetview might show us if it was a success?

While the streetview offered during today's investigation doesn't imply a sprawling metropolis, it does confirm that the bazaar is still standing, and now a fruit and veg shop. As well as confirming the location and subject, today's contributors suggest a possible date range: using the visible penny periodicals to refine the five decade catalogue range to a decade or so c.1900. (Seemingly the "1d Pictorial Magazine" was first published c.1899, and the "Scraps Magazine" ceased publication in 1910). Whether the two chaps to the right are visiting the seaside from nearby Dundalk, members of the Casey family (proprieters and sub-postmasters) or just local photo-bombers, we may never know :)


Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Catalogue range c.1865-1914. Likely c.1899-1910

NLI Ref: L_ROY_06742

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 10186
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio thelawrencephotographcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland bazaar blackrock colouth persian enclosedmarket metropolis countylouth shop beach theshamrock pictorialmagazine scrapsmagazine nacreagachadubha seaside promenade holidays spades postoffice sandylane searoad mainstreet casey lucycasey haggardstown gilbey thomascasey ter locationidentified

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    derangedlemur

    • 06/Feb/2017 09:07:01

    I was there the other month (on the Heritage & Buns Trail). It's a vegetable shop now, as far as I remember.

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    domenico milella

    • 06/Feb/2017 09:10:11

    Congratulation for your beautiful Album.

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    beachcomberaustralia

    • 06/Feb/2017 09:15:07

    [https:[email protected]] Well done The Lemur ! The building changes colour one google-step south - goo.gl/maps/tRg2CbTG8X32

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    philipgmayer

    • 06/Feb/2017 09:20:07

    M&S started out as "Penny Bazaars" in markets.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Feb/2017 09:25:14

    Not in the NIAH database, and I don't see an entry in the DIA, either.

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    philipgmayer

    • 06/Feb/2017 09:25:34

    scotchwhisky.com/whiskypedia/5989/w-a-gilbey/

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Feb/2017 09:28:35

    Quite a lot of text, but no instantly obvious dates via newspapers...

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    derangedlemur

    • 06/Feb/2017 09:29:10

    Looks like it was a post office back in the day: maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V2,707250,802851,12,9 edit: Right enough, there's a sign under the whisky advertisment saying just that.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Feb/2017 09:40:04

    Looks as if the building was present for the 1907 25" survey.

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    derangedlemur

    • 06/Feb/2017 09:40:33

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] If you can find a Weekly Telegraph archive, you've got a pretty distinctive cover there.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Feb/2017 09:43:11

    Lucy Casey, shopkeeper and subpostmistress, was 52 in 1911.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Feb/2017 09:44:39

    in 1901, her husband Thomas was subpostmaster.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Feb/2017 09:48:32

    The signage here says T., so perhaps before 1911?

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Feb/2017 09:51:11

    Here is a reverse view in the archive, and here is a postcard with that view, originally posted in 1912.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Feb/2017 09:55:15

    Another copy of that postcard, but it is earlier than the archive image, I think. The shop is a Grocer and Draper, no offie and no sign of the post office...

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Feb/2017 10:04:40

    Thomas died in 1907, I believe. This Google hit says: CASEY, Thomas ... the personal Estate of Thomas Casey late of Blackrock County Louth Shopkeeper deceased who died 7 August 1907 were granted at Armagh to Lucy Casey the Widow Effects £1,`552 11s. 11d.

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    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 06/Feb/2017 10:24:15

    Is it remarkable, for an RC-owned shop with so many "figurines", that there are no religious statuary on display? And no sliothars either!

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Feb/2017 10:29:24

    Googling "pictorial magazine" may generate some not-entirely-suitable-for-the-office results.

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    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 06/Feb/2017 10:29:48

    All those styles of spades - none of which seem capable of breaking Louth (or Monaghan stoney grey) soil. But wait! They must be seaside spades for (non-Antipodean) Beachcombers.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Feb/2017 10:34:36

    [https:[email protected]] Yes, a sign at right says "Useful Presents for the Season".

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    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 06/Feb/2017 10:39:48

    Newspaper ad for Van Heutons Cocoa. But it does little to narrow the date window . . . en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coenraad_Johannes_van_Houten

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    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 06/Feb/2017 10:58:07

    "The Shamrock" periodical published 1866-1913

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    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 06/Feb/2017 11:04:36

    "The Shamrock was an Irish weekly illustrated newspaper founded in 1866. It was originally published by the Irish National Newspaper and Publishing Co., Dublin. The first issue appeared on October 6, 1866, and the last issue appeared on August 10, 1912. On August 17, 1912 it was merged with The Irish Emerald to form The Shamrock and Irish Emerald. This newspaper ceased publication on May 27, 1922" Source: www.bramstoker.org/

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Feb/2017 11:23:53

    That reverse view in the archive has similar signage and products (but not the same day/time), and has a crate labelled James Couttie and Sons, Dundee. The firm seems to have been wound up in 1893. [Edit: No - I see refs in 1922-23 to James Couttie and Sons, so they survived in some form]

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    O Mac

    • 06/Feb/2017 11:37:47

    Three chairs..Hip Hip....

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Feb/2017 11:59:18

    Lucy Casey branched out into cinema later: As summer 1914 approached, it appeared that women were taking a more proprietorial role in Irish cinema. On 30 April, the Bioscope published the registration details of the Blackrock Picture Theatre Company, which had been incorporated in Dublin on 20 March. The report listed four women – Mrs. R. Murphy, Mrs. L. Casey, Miss E. Lineham and Miss M. Lineham – among its five directors (“World of Finance”). Little is known of these women, but Lucy Casey was the postmistress and a shopkeeper in the seaside village of Blackrock, Co. Louth, where the company’s new picture house was to be located.

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    A.Davey

    • 06/Feb/2017 13:47:05

    Are the spades used for cutting turf?

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    guliolopez

    • 06/Feb/2017 13:49:23

    [https:[email protected]] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] - On the newspapers, I think I can see: - "The Shamrock" - published 1866 to 1913? - "Cassell's Saturday Journal" - published 1883 to 1921? - "Scraps Magazine" - seemingly published 1883 to 1910. - "Pictorial Magazine" (or similar - costing 1 penny) - which I can't identify (and requires anyone who tries - as Niall mentions - to wade through some NSFW material) - "The Weekly Telegraph" - which will likely be only useful in dating if someone can find that particular issue/front-page EDIT - I think the "1d Pictorial Magazine" or "Penny Pictorial Magazine" was published between 1898/99 and 1922. If it was, it would put this image between 1898/99 (first issue of "1d Pictorial Magazine"), and 1910 (last issue of "Scraps Magazine").

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Feb/2017 15:45:21

    Squinting at the reverse view (which is not identical, but is similar enough), I think I see a poster on a wall behind the shop for "DAVIES CIRCUS".

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Feb/2017 15:48:04

    Dan Davies' Circus is mentioned in the Playboy of the Western World from 1907.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 06/Feb/2017 16:11:34

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/adavey] Hi Alan, thank you for dropping by! To answer your question, No, the Bazaar is right on the beach and the spades were for building sand castles! The spade for turf cutting, AKA a "Sleain" would look more like these! [https://www.flickr.com/photos/cessna152towser/2585650244/in/photolist-4Wu8JC-8yCELQ-7Eja9o-b9ZqkM-5j17Nq-d6GYBy-JywHwb-5MJBzT-7hmKUd-qxPZRn-fvUjA1-osWk7F-m1fjjG-in5v9-aC5nTb-qZqcj3-dQVj6i-81JzpW-bWLqtA-rXxBNZ-71dZo5-jaXytz-B2c9J-7Uj4F2-6JEsiy-51ufGA-eVkUsZ-gWF6LF-eWsDso-abFx3t-eKFQ8Z-bMfHAv-4SqFrz-6G38wc-jWw1PS-87C2ro-5j19ZS-5iVTfc-5iVQDF-pUuRms-o6k95i-ekGP1y-5iVPND-cHeeb1-6nQs6E-4pr9cB-3pNbTi-dRtJ6V-5iVQWx-7z8uiP]

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Feb/2017 16:17:25

    I think Davies Circus was also known as Davies' Paragon Circus. There is a reference in the Tyrone Constitution, 14th June 1901: DAVIES'S PARAGON CIRCUS, Now beating all previous records, will visit Omagh, THursday June 20. This seasons company includes among others the following renowned artistes - THE MARVELLOUS ZALOS assisted CARL ORANT, the celebrated aerialists. PRINCESS...

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Feb/2017 16:23:30

    Oct. 1898, same paper.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Feb/2017 16:28:43

    general search 1890-1910 for Paragon Davies sees them in 1898, 1901, 02, in Ballymena, Longford, Tyrone, Fethard...

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Feb/2017 16:30:28

    1902 seems to have made the biggest splash.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Feb/2017 16:44:57

    Celestial wonderworkers. Tycoon troupe of real japanese

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    silverio10

    • 06/Feb/2017 19:53:38

    Muy buenas fotos antiguas

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    dantheserene

    • 06/Feb/2017 20:32:28

    Are the points on the roof for keeping birds off or something?

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 06/Feb/2017 23:10:46

    Excellent - Thanks [https:[email protected]] (and [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] and [https:[email protected]]) for confirmation on location. And [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley], [https:[email protected]] and [https:[email protected]] for input on the likely date range. Excellent stuff as usual!

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 07/Feb/2017 01:28:47

    A letter box (postal), bags of onions? hanging by the door and so many shovels under the letter box! Postal savings bank, money orders and regular snail mail service along the right side.

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    Dr. Ilia

    • 15/Feb/2017 09:00:07

    good image

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