Boyne Valley: Lake House, Boyne Valley, Co. Louth

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Where: Unnamed Road, Crewbane, Co. Meath, Ireland

When: Unknown

This fine shot of two canal boats at the lock in a canal would seem appropriate to many counties. While County Louth may not seem the most obvious candidate, yet that is the caption on this lovely Lawrence image. The boats do not appear to be the usual goods vessels, but rather a towing engine and perhaps a pleasure craft? Can anybody enlighten Morning Mary, please?

And enlightened I have been. The consensus is that these are touring pleasure craft on a stretch of the Boyne Navigation. Perhaps close to Rossnaree and Newgrange. While not "our" vessel, other similar steam launches seemingly carried tourists from Oldbridge (near Drogheda) to Slane in County Meath. Medea_ry advises that "our" launch may have been one of three named 'Shamrock', 'Tara' and 'Boyne', probably the latter....


Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: c.1865-1914 (possibly late 19th C)

NLI Ref: L_CAB_07800

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 9933
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio thelawrencephotographcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland canal boats steampropulsion pleasurecraft lock cottage posing boynevalley colouth ireland rósnarigh boynenavigation steamlaunch charlieallnut whatatimewevehadrosiewhatatime africanqueen rosnaree lakehouse

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  • profile

    swordscookie back and trying to catch up!

    • 16/Feb/2017 09:35:44

    Delighted to be able to contribute to the education of Morning Mary! See below from Wikipedia? "The Boyne Navigation (Irish: Loingseoireachta na Bóinne) is a series of canals running 31 km (19 mi)[2] roughly parallel to the River Boyne from Oldbridge to Navan in County Meath, in Ireland. The navigation was once used by horse-drawn boats travelling between Navan, Slane and the port of Drogheda; however is now derelict. The navigation is currently being restored voluntarily. The Boyne Navigation branch of the Inland Waterways Association of Ireland have an agreement with An Taisce giving it an exclusive license to carry out restoration work on the navigation to return it to a usable waterway." I first came across it when kayaking down the Boyne to Slane, though I must admit that I did not realise that the intermittent strips of contained water amounted to a canal! I also crossed it when visiting Newgrange when leaving the Interpretative Centre to reach the coaches taking us to the monument!

  • profile

    beachcomberaustralia

    • 16/Feb/2017 09:49:28

    "The Rós na Righ was a steam launch[1] which made trips on the Boyne Navigation between Oldbridge and Slane in Ireland. There are many other photos which feature the Rós na Righ which are contained in the William Laurence Photographic Collection.[2] It can be hard to search this collection for examples of these photos below. Photograph 9997 [3] from this collection show Rós na Righ in the foreground and Slane Castle in the background. Photograph 4206 [4] shows Rós na Righ under a man made archway locally referred to as the Scabby Arch [5] on the Boyne Navigation. Photograph 7800[6] show a photo of Rós na Righ at Morgan's/ Rosnaree Lock (a double lock) on the Boyne Navigation. ... " From en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ros_na_Righ

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    Niall McAuley

    • 16/Feb/2017 10:15:41

    Maybe here? maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V2,698448,773367,12,9 There are a couple of locks near Rosnaree, but this is the one with a little house.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 16/Feb/2017 10:18:36

    No streetview, but an aerial view from google.

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    beachcomberaustralia

    • 16/Feb/2017 10:23:42

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] I think you are right - you can just see a stone bridge in the background marked on the 25" map (see note).

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 16/Feb/2017 10:26:17

    Here is Owen Morgan, lockkeeper, aged 71 in the 1911 census.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 16/Feb/2017 10:30:03

    From the House and Building Return, we learn that the house had 3 rooms, 2 windows to the front and was owned by the Boyne Navigation Company.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 16/Feb/2017 10:36:10

    The steamer Ros na Righ in L-ROY_09997 is an entirely different boat.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 16/Feb/2017 10:40:29

    L_IMP_4206 is that larger Ros Na Righ, also.

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    beachcomberaustralia

    • 16/Feb/2017 10:46:56

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] Oh dear! Can anyone read the nameplate ?

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    Niall McAuley

    • 16/Feb/2017 12:00:45

    1902 James McCann chairman of the Grand Canal Company established the Meath River Navigation Company. He leased the Boyne Navigation for seven years. He activated tourist potential by having passenger trips. He died in 1904

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 16/Feb/2017 12:22:12

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] Squinting at the megazoom, it might be ROAM It's pretty short, anyhow.

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 16/Feb/2017 13:43:44

    looks the boat in the African Queen. Bogey on board?

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    swordscookie back and trying to catch up!

    • 16/Feb/2017 15:49:12

    Brian, Bogey went missing as did Katherine Hepburn but please don't start any rumours????

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    Andre's Street Photography

    • 16/Feb/2017 18:53:23

    Beautiful historical photo!

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    CASSIDY PHOTOGRAPHY

    • 16/Feb/2017 21:08:10

    Strange, yet interesting the way these seemingly unrelated men are standing randomly placed staring at the camera. Though the chap standing nearest, wearing hat and vest under his coat and light trousers, seems to be fairly important, as he is flanked by two tough guys, both similarly dressed, with short neckties. I am guessing they are his protection. So, there is more to this story. Considering the time-frame of the photo and events, perhaps the main character is a Nationalist . . . Maybe a person fairly high up in the chain-of-command who needed protection.

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 17/Feb/2017 02:48:02

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie] Ah, we'll always have Paris.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 17/Feb/2017 10:23:55

    Thanks all. While a pity we couldn't "name that boat", I like the idea of the boatman being a distant Bogart relation - he certainly has a "Charlie Allnut" bearing about him. Hopefully his lady passengers kept him in-line:

    "Ah, it's a great thing to have a lady aboard with clean habits. It sets the man a good example. A man alone, he gets to livin' like a hog" - Charlie Allnut (Bogart / African Queen / 1951)
    Map, description, etc all updated!

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    medea_ry

    • 22/Feb/2017 12:24:53

    Tug and passenger tender negotiating upper chamber of Rosnaree (Morgan's) Lock c. mid-1890s - source Tony Holten

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    medea_ry

    • 22/Feb/2017 12:26:31

    There were three lighter boats that sailed from Navan to Oldbridge on passenger trips along the canal, names were Tara, Boyne and Shamrock - just a thought

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    beachcomberaustralia

    • 22/Feb/2017 13:07:06

    I vote for 'BOYNE'.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Feb/2017 15:28:11

    Excellent [https:[email protected]]. We were already fairly certain of location (Rosnaree lock). Great to hear a confident suggestion on date (1890s). And I'd concur that the nameplate would seem consistent with "Boyne" - giving us subject also. Thanks! (Description tweaked slightly)