Funny looking yokes

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Where: Unknown

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When: 23 May 1959

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When Morning Mary was growing up in West Cork the sight of one of these Bus/Trains would have been described as "funny looking yokes entirely"! It is quite a while since we posted an O'Dea shot, and these interesting pieces of rolling stock from the Great Northern Railway. What were they doing in Inchicore and is there any example available today?

Seemingly several examples of these railbuses (and perhaps even one of these if the complicated numbering and renumbering schemes can be deciphered) have survived and are displayed in the Ulster Folk and Transport Museum....


Photographer: James P. O'Dea

Collection:James P. O'Dea

Date: 23 May 1959

NLI Ref.: ODEA 14/59

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 5673
jamespo’dea o’deaphotographiccollection nationallibraryofireland railbus greatnorthernrailways rollingstock ireland engineeringworks inchicore dublin ulster ulstertransportmuseum cultra railbuses

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  • profile

    robinparkes

    • 13/Feb/2019 08:48:02

    That will be post 1958 when the assets of the GNR were split between the UTA and CIE. One of those rail buses is preserved and resident in the transport gallery of the Ulster Folk and Transport Museum, Cultra. www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/40115430283/in/datepos...

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    sharon.corbet

    • 13/Feb/2019 08:48:03

    According to wikipedia these are called railbuses. The wikipedia article includes a photo of a GNR Railbus at the Ulster Folk and Transport Museum.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 13/Feb/2019 08:49:29

    23 May 1959 was a Saturday ... "Ireland The Great Northern Railway of Ireland produced railbuses at the Railway Works in Dundalk. " en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railbus#Ireland The Ulster Folk and Transport Museum has a 1928 one in blue and cream livery - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Cultra_a4.jpg Ed. Snap @ [https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet] & [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] !

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    CASSIDY PHOTOGRAPHY

    • 13/Feb/2019 08:50:32

    So, think about the evolution of public transportation. horse and wagon horse and carriage horse drawn tram car electric tram "funny looking yokes" (a hybrid, really) smoky diesel bus

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 13/Feb/2019 08:58:20

    There was also a later version used by Northern Railways.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 13/Feb/2019 08:59:17

    Flickr is sometimes amazing! "No.1" In 2017 via [https://www.flickr.com/photos/mjyrailphotos/] Is it the same railbus? Ed. - No. Ours is No.2 !! [https://www.flickr.com/photos/mjyrailphotos/39523284795/]

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    robinparkes

    • 13/Feb/2019 09:04:40

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] It's a similar one. The windows are different to the ones in the O'Dea photo.

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    Wendy:

    • 13/Feb/2019 09:06:24

    funny yokes indeed!

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    Rienk Mebius

    • 13/Feb/2019 09:54:11

    It looks really sagged. Notice the angle between halfcab and saloon.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 13/Feb/2019 10:41:49

    There's a bit more information on the German wiki: The rail company Great Northern Railway (GNR) built a series of Railbuses in the 1930s, including for other companies like the Sligo, Leitrim and Northern Counties Railway (SL&NCR). The vehicles were busses that were adapted to run on tracks, similar to the French Michelines with gas-filled rubber tires (Howden-Meredith patent wheels). The front axle later got normal train wheels to be able to work with the electric circuit of the signal system. Narrow gauge railways also used vehicles adapted from buses. Already in 1926, County Donegal Railway (CDR) procured two used two axel petrol motor buses from the english Derwent Valley Light Railway (DVLR) and adapted them. They were in use until 1934.

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 13/Feb/2019 11:06:05

    weird, closest thing we have here are trolleybuses, regular bus for road use with a trolley pole to get electricity from the overhead wires.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 13/Feb/2019 11:19:26

    A bit more at www.classicbuses.co.uk/+GNR.html "34 ZI 1704 ADC 416 416631 - ?? B30 new 6/28; ex Fairways, Dublin 18 4/29; w/d -/35; to Dundalk, Newry and Greenore Railway -/35; converted to railbus 2 -/35; to G N R 4 -/48; r/n 8177 -/55; to C I E C8178N 10/58; scrapped ?/?? " Someone please translate ... !

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    sharon.corbet

    • 13/Feb/2019 11:43:26

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] I would assume that it was withdrawn from service, transferred to the Dundalk, Newry and Greenore Railway and converted to railbus no. 2 all at some unknown point in 1935 , transferred to the GNR as Railbus 4 in 1948, renumbered as 8177 in 1955, transferred to CIE as C8178N in October 1958 and then assumed to be scrapped. So possibly not this railbus no. 2.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 13/Feb/2019 11:52:43

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet] "renumbered as 8177 in 1955" - the railbus behind has the number 8177 on the back (see note). Hmmm...

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 13/Feb/2019 11:54:45

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] Just about to comment that myself!

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 13/Feb/2019 16:40:41

    The Indo had an article about the GNR rail-buses back in 2012, with info on the development and use of the rail buses.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 13/Feb/2019 20:47:56

    Thanks all. I've updated the description with a very short summary. Unfortunately, as has been the case for several weeks now, I cannot update the map however. (According to Flickr Support, the Flickr "engineers have done some testing and did find some underlying issues", which may prove a "starting point to be able to correct the issue". But, I'm still unable to map images. Which means a significant leg of our place/time/subject trifecta is missing for the time being. Sad panda face :( )

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    jamica1

    • 13/Feb/2019 21:36:56

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/cassidyphotography] And always on time!

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    O Mac

    • 14/Feb/2019 00:23:30

    How did the back tyres stay on the rails?

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 14/Feb/2019 07:51:51

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] There's some info in an article on converting a Bus for Rail Work from 1934: The vehicles have special pneumatictyred wheels, which are shallow and unusually wide, and carry normal brake drums. A steel tyre, flanged on the outside for contact with the rail and machined on the inside with annular projections to engage with the grooves of the pneumatic tyre and prevent slipping, is fitted over the outer surface of the pneumatic. The inside diameter of the steel rim being somewhat smaller than the overall diameter of the fully inflated pneumatic tyre, both are held firmly together to form a rigid wheel.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 14/Feb/2019 08:50:47

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet] Yes, megazoom™ at full blast seems to show that. catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000304633