But where's the Recess?

Download this image

More from this collection

Related by When

Support Pastpin!

Where: R344, Co. Galway, Ireland

Try to find the spot where the photographer was standing.

When: Unknown

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
This beautiful landscape of Lough Inagh in Connemara in cabinet size by Lawrence is todays image! I always wondered about the name 'Recess' and where it came from. Perhaps today we might learn more?

While we didn't learn anything about the origin of 'Recess' (a town about 7km from this spot), we did learn that this spot is just as picturesque today. BeachcomberAustralia links us to a 2011 image taken from exactly the same spot :)

Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Catalogue range c.1865-1914

NLI Ref: _CAB_04295

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 8330
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio thelawrencephotographcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland loughinagh recess cogalway connemara lake mountain landscape sidecar road lakesideroad countygalway sruffaunatooreen lough twelvebens jaunty

Add Tags
  • profile

    B-59

    • 19/Apr/2017 07:43:20

    Streetview

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 19/Apr/2017 08:22:17

    Is that our young friend "Jaunty"? With a moustache ... See also - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000325362 catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000325364 catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000333123 catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000325361

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 19/Apr/2017 08:26:59

    I believe that bridge is over the charmingly named Sruffaunatooreen stream. Neither the road or bridge are on the 1830s 6", but I don't see a date for them yet.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 19/Apr/2017 09:43:32

    Flickr is sometimes amazing - in2011 by [https://www.flickr.com/photos/stationstudios/] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/stationstudios/5823876201/]

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 19/Apr/2017 09:51:51

    The bridge is well-built - [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/14398126841/]And has a good view from underneath - [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/14378362306/]via [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/]

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 19/Apr/2017 15:51:36

    I had lunch at Lough Inagh Lodge which is very near to here only a few weeks ago, a very pleasant experience. [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] I am not subscribing to your Mustached Jaunty theory.

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 19/Apr/2017 19:31:15

    I believe this was one of the many roads that Alexander Nimmo designed and had built when he was Engineer to the Western District, a post created under the "Act for the Employment of the Poor in certain Districts of Ireland" in 1822.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 19/Apr/2017 20:35:04

    Thanks [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] - That is pretty amazing alright! An almost exact match :) (Map, tags, etc updated....)

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 19/Apr/2017 22:19:26

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] I am not sure it is Jaunty either, though he does look well-dressed. [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] That's interesting. I wonder if the photo was taken from the area used by the stonemasons, and that unusual square-shaped rock in the middle foreground is a discarded piece of the bridge. It certainly does not look as if it was formed by a glacier. I have no idea about the derivation of Recess, but Trove came up with this delightful story of the visit of King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra in July 1903. "... waiving all formalities, they allowed the peasants to push their carriage up the hills" !! And granted royal clemency to an old woman's husband ... trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/172898860?searchTerm=r...

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 20/Apr/2017 00:36:47

    The Benna Beola Mountains (Twelve Bens ) are composed principally of hard, resistant quartzites of the Dalradian age. formed about 540 million years ago. The photograph has to have been taken some time after that.

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 20/Apr/2017 07:51:26

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] There's a photo in the UK National Archives described as : 'Photograph. their Majesties King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra being escorted up the hill by the peasantry to the Connemara Marble Quarries Recess, County Galway, Ireland, on July 29th 1903' The copyright owner and author of the work is Herbert Edward Haffield, of 7 Summer Hill, Kingstown. I'll order it next time I'm there. It'll be a break from searching through crew lists of Kings Lynn vessels 1846-48.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Apr/2017 08:04:20

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] We can do a little better than that: the horse only evolved 1.6 million years ago!

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 21/Apr/2017 05:50:56

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] I think I see a "Wheel" - which suggests sometime after the second half of the 4th millennium BCE,

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 21/Apr/2017 08:02:00

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Well spotted [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] . It think I see another one. Yes! there is three wheels.

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 21/Apr/2017 21:47:58

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] On your Wagon?

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 22/Apr/2017 08:19:26

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] If that is an arched bridge which I think it is, we could narrow the range even further. [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] I was quick to say not Jaunty which I stand by, but I do believe this is 100% the photographers kit transport.

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 23/Apr/2017 22:11:32

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Getting serious. I'd chance dating this photograph post 1895 on it being a cloudy day and the jarvey isn't wearing a raincoat------ nor or there any to be seen on the trap. Whatever about now, the Inagh valley would have been in the middle of nowhere back then. Knowing the area well, I know no one would think of going up there without a raincoat. Cliften, Letterfrack or Maam cross would have been too far to come on a trap without one. I therefore surmise that this is a local jarvey and French was either staying in the GWR hotel in Recess or he came on a day trip to Recess by train. The Galway-Cliften railway opened in 1895.

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 05/May/2017 07:44:28

    "Their Majesties King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra being escorted up the hill by the peasantry, to the Connemara Marble Quarries Recess Co. Galway Ireland. On July 29th 1903" by Herbert Edward Haffield, of 7 Summer Hill, Kingstown.

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 05/May/2017 07:58:13

    And here they are inspecting the quarries. "Their Majesties King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra in the Connemara Marble Quarries Recess Co. Galway Ireland on July29th 1903"

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 05/May/2017 12:28:00

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner] What great photos! Thanks for posting them. I came across a wonderful short chapter in a book, 'Memories: Wise and Otherwise' by Sir Henry Robinson, who arranged and accompanied the King's trip around Connemara in 1903 (even along this very stretch of road). Wonderful anecdotes about policemen in disguise, the local cavalry at Recess, Queen Alexandra brushing sand off Princess Victoria's dress at the quarry, etc. Chapter XVII including more photos - archive.org/stream/memorieswiseothe00robiuoft#page/150/mo... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_Henry_Robinson,_1st_Baronet

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 06/May/2017 10:07:33

    The London Times wasn't very complimentary about the horses in the picture

    The carriage which bore their Majesties to the quarries had been chosen, it is said, on the ground that it possessed some historic associations. So, apparently, had the horses, which required a liberal application of the whipcord before the jarvey could induce them to move at any pace , and then they utterly failed to conquer the steep ascent to the marble quarries.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 06/May/2017 14:35:46

    Excellent - Thanks [https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner]!