"Large public building, railings, steps, 6 columns in portico, 2 guns on plinths, one plinth inscribed India" is Tralee Courthouse

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Where: Kerry Protestant Hall, Ashe St, Cloonalour, Tralee, Co. Kerry, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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Another stereo pair image in single format for better viewing! This fine building defended by two unworkable cannon on high plinths looks very impressive and imposing whereever it may be. A nice way to end the week!

Rory Sherlock quickly identified this as Tralee Courthouse, and we learned that the cannon were dedicated to local men who took part in decidedly non-local battles. There's a firm suggestion that this image dates to after 1871, when the commemorative plaques were changed.....


Photographers: Frederick Holland Mares, James Simonton

Contributor: John Fortune Lawrence

Collection: Stereo Pairs Photograph Collection

Date: Catalogue range c.1860-1883. Possibly c.1871-1880s

NLI Ref: STP_1846

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 7772
thestereopairsphotographcollection lawrencecollection stereographicnegatives jamessimonton frederickhollandmares johnfortunelawrence williammervynlawrence nationallibraryofireland building cannons plinths steps columns collonade tralee countykerry court courthouse cannon ashestreet crimea india plaque crimeanwar indianrebellion locationidentified

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 19/May/2017 08:12:24

    Ooo! Those look like Crimea cannon. We had them before somewhere ...

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    Rory_Sherlock

    • 19/May/2017 08:20:19

    Tralee Courthouse: Streetview www.google.ie/maps/@52.2698091,-9.7041328,3a,90y,82.88h,9...

  • profile

    Rory_Sherlock

    • 19/May/2017 08:26:17

    Other NLI Images: catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000333257 catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000322367

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 19/May/2017 08:57:10

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Well done! About the cannons - www.independent.ie/regionals/kerryman/lifestyle/canons-ho... including -

    ... the decommissioned cannon were still explosive until just a few years ago. In late 2012 five sticks of gelignite, detonators and a fuse were found stuffed into one of the them. The explosives, which were viable, had lain undiscovered in the cannon for over 20 years following a failed attempt by republicans to destroy the memorial.
    Flickr group devoted to Crimean Cannon - www.flickr.com/groups/[email protected]/

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 19/May/2017 09:20:16

    "... the original bronze lettering [on the memorials] was replaced in 1871 with limestone panels, owing to vandalism." What are we seeing here? From - books.google.com.au/books?id=yD_jDQAAQBAJ&pg=PA83&...

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    Asdeewest

    • 19/May/2017 09:36:07

    Some time back dynamite was found in the barrels of the cannons. They said it dated back to the war of independence

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 19/May/2017 09:47:35

    I see this is in Ashe Street, Tralee. Is this named after the Thomas Ashe of four days ago? Would be a serendipitous coincidence. It used to be Nelson Street at the time of the photo - maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V2,483696,614496,11,8

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    Niall McAuley

    • 19/May/2017 10:50:30

    Per this page: The role of Thomas Ashe was not forgotten.His native county commemorated him by renaming Nelson Street in the capital town, Tralee in his honour and in 1928 when the impressive new headquarters of Kerry County Council was completed in 1928 it was called the Ashe Memorial Hall.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 19/May/2017 10:53:49

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] I am inclined to think this is the post-71 limestone lettering.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 19/May/2017 11:01:39

    There is a soldier in uniform at the top of the steps - any takers? I do not recognize the style of his hat.

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    MukeshPhoto

    • 19/May/2017 11:31:08

    Stunning

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    Bernard Healy

    • 19/May/2017 13:35:45

    Argh! I'm disappointed that I arrived so late to the photo of this building which is literally a 2 minute walk from where I'm sitting. The Courthouse has been in the news recently as the Courts Service is determined to move court sittings in Tralee from this building to a modern purpose-built building away from the centre of town. The local Law Society and town business people are opposed to the move for a variety of reasons. In addition to commemorating Kerrymen who died in the Crimean War and the Indian Mutiny, soldiers who died during the Second Opium War are also listed on the monument. I concur that the panels on the above picture look a lot more like carving on limestone than bronze lettering. I've never seen a picture of the courthouse with that telegraph pole before. (Ironically, one of the reasons that the Courthouse is difficult to adapt for modern use is the fact that part of the courthouse grounds is used by An Post for telecommunications equipment.) I'm impressed by how shiny the canons are, compared to their current condition. I suppose they were polished regularly back then. Finally, I note that the animal carving on the plinth nearer the camera is in a much better condition than it is nowadays. Anyone want to guess what kind of animal it is? I've never been able to figure it out!

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 19/May/2017 19:19:17

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] Have a look at this image: www.britishbattles.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/1st-Roy... These are said to be Royal Munster Fusiliers Officers, 1890s. Is it possible that their caps are of that style? They seem to have badges on the right side of their caps like the soldier in the picture. Picture found here: www.britishbattles.com/battles-of-belmont-and-graspan/

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    Niall McAuley

    • 20/May/2017 11:08:36

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy] They are not wearing a dark uniforn with a white belt there, they are in more practical khakis. But the hat looks good. here is a poster with a darker uniform/white belt combo including that cap: www.historyireland.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/The-Roy...

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    Bernard Healy

    • 20/May/2017 15:02:25

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] - Yeah, the cap was the only thing I was trying to match. There is a book out about the history of Ballymullen Barracks, Tralee and that might have info about other regiments spending time in the Tralee area, but it was the Royal Munsters (The Dirty Shirts) that had Tralee as their depot.

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    silverio10

    • 20/May/2017 19:50:43

    Buena serie de fotos antiguas .

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 20/May/2017 23:17:20

    Muchas gracias for everyone's contributions on this one. Especially to [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] for quickly identifying the location, and to [https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy] for the extra/local knowledge on the courthouse and the cannon flanking its steps!

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    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 22/May/2017 09:15:23

    Some of the articles referred to mention that the canons were "used in" various campaigns. I always thought these were RUSSIAN canons captured a war booty in the Crimea and were distributed for display across many towns in Britain & Ireland. The one in Dun Laoghaire - now near the start of the East Pier is a fine example.

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    Gerry Ward

    • 22/May/2017 22:11:56

    If the lives of the irishmen who died in India or the Crimea meant anything , then these memorials wouldn't be allowed to fall into disrepair with encroaching vegetation dwarfing their significance! www.flickr.com/photos/gerryward/5697669955

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/May/2017 23:36:53

    Thanks [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gerryward] - Those trees do seem to improve the streetscape. But absolutely they could perhaps do with some pruning... www.flickr.com/photos/gerryward/5697669955/