The Quay, Wexford, Co. Wexford

Download this image

More from this collection

Related by When

Related by Where

Support Pastpin!

Where: Crescent Quay, Ferrybank South, Wexford, Ireland

When: Unknown

Leaving the politics of the early 20th century behind we begin this week with an image by Robert French of the Quays in Wexford. Masts, handcarts, ropes, idlers, cargo, sailing ships, paddle steamers - the place was alive and must have had a buzz about it.

Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Between c.1865-1914. Possibly before c.1895.

NLI Ref: L_CAB_06446

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 6442
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio thelawrencephotographcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland ships sailingships masts shadows handcarts trolleys paddlesteamer railwaylines sheds idlers dockers dog woodenworks wexford countywexford crescentquay quay grocersapostrophe drawbridge steamer bank bankofireland provincialbank dockworkers port pilewharf wharf

Add Tags
  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 10/Jul/2017 07:54:32

    I see a Dog.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 10/Jul/2017 08:14:52

    I'm getting deja vu again..

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 10/Jul/2017 08:20:58

    25" map link Streetview

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 10/Jul/2017 08:22:16

    Nice grocer's apostrophe there.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 10/Jul/2017 08:30:31

    The big Bank of Ireland is no help with dating at 1832 in the NIAH, but beyond it I see the Credit Union, originally the Provincial Bank (DIA link), which was only "proposed" in Dec 1881.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 10/Jul/2017 09:02:56

    Which was first? catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000334158 (this photo) catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000322438 (without apostrophe) And for comparison - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000337810 (c. 1910 ??)

  • profile

    Foxglove

    • 10/Jul/2017 09:52:43

    hey hey cripple creek ferry I see a dog but no ships cat

  • profile

    guliolopez

    • 10/Jul/2017 09:55:08

    Fantastic image. As [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] notes, the NIAH entry for the Bank building probably doesn't help much. The entry for Crescent Quay's cobblestones (mapped to the bank's front step) are probably even less useful :) Have we seen an entry for flagstones before?

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 10/Jul/2017 09:58:34

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] I think 2348 is about 1 minute before this one, 4158, from the positions of the pedestrians on the tracks. I think catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000337810 is years later - I see a telegraph/phone pole added. The building just short of the Provincial Bank has changed (and has a clock).

  • profile

    Inverarra

    • 10/Jul/2017 09:59:33

    Lovely photo. High quality shot of an old paddle steamer. The invention of the propellor proved to be much more efficient but there was something majestic in the old paddle boats. Thanks for sharing.

  • profile

    KestrelSprite

    • 10/Jul/2017 10:11:33

    Judging by the slight blurriness of the man in the centre walking down the railway tracks, I would guess an exposure of about 1/10 of a second. The excellent image quality points to a plate camera. I don't think this could be earlier than 1890 and it could be as late as 1910 - was Wexford harbour that busy by 1910?

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 10/Jul/2017 10:40:08

    The signal cabin isn't marked on the 25". Too early, or too late?

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 10/Jul/2017 10:44:37

    L_CAB_06454 is a view of this quay from the Ballast Bank. The buildings seem to match today's shot, not the later one.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 10/Jul/2017 10:56:18

    L_CAB_02058 is earlier still, no Provincial Bank. Note that in today's and earlier, the Bank of Ireland has blackened, wonky chimney pots (metal, perhaps?). In the later catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000337810 (L_CAB_02061) the pots have been replaced with straight, clean matching pots.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 10/Jul/2017 11:26:08

    Mr French / Lawrence was there earlier when they were constructing the wooden quay extension called the Woodenworks and this bridge which might be relatively easy to date. See the guillotine-like pile-driver in these - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000337811 catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000337809 catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000337807 (L_CAB_02058 mentioned above)

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 10/Jul/2017 11:36:02

    ... The main railway line was run along the inside of the old quayfront. They got a bridge across the Crescent that rolled back along the railway tracks to allow access. The Woodenworks or Pilewharf were erected to allow railway wagons to be shunted on to them to be loaded or unloaded with cargoes from ships which plied the oceans of the world. The railway company charged 2s 6d for every wagon loaded there. A train travelling along the quay could not exceed walking pace and a man carrying a red flag by day and a red lantern by night wlaked in front of it. The Wexford to Rosslare (Ballygeary) line opened on 24 June 1882 but closed after ten years. It was reopened by the Fishguard Company on 4 August 1894. ...
    From - books.google.com.au/books?id=RZxvAwAAQBAJ&pg=PT163&am...

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 10/Jul/2017 12:06:48

    This Eason shot is post 1900, and features clean pots, the round roofed building and a more modern steamer.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 10/Jul/2017 12:39:13

    There was a "Accelerated service between Wexford & Liverpool: the first-class, full-powered, new steel screw steamer "Eden Vale" (Captain A. Cogley)" which started in 1894 - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000253152 (Return 18s 0d) I think the photo is before 1894 ...

  • profile

    guliolopez

    • 10/Jul/2017 15:39:18

    Looks like the Wexford People covered this image (or the one taken seconds earlier, or years later - is not clear as mentions a train which we don't see). It's in an article titled "Shedding new light on an old Wexford image" , Wexford People, 14 Jan 2014. That article dates the image to "late 1800s or early 1900s". But doesn't attribute it to Robert French (which is intriguing).

  • profile

    jamica1

    • 10/Jul/2017 17:16:46

    Nice mix of technologies

  • profile

    sam2cents

    • 10/Jul/2017 22:12:51

    Fantastic! It really was buzzing. A moment in time captured wonderfully. And the weather was pretty good too. I notice that there doesn't seem to be any form of street lighting, so maybe if there are records for the first installation of street lights it would be possible to get a better idea.