Harbour & Parade, Portstewart, Co. Derry

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Where: 5C Harbour Pl, Portstewart BT55 7AY, UK

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When: Unknown

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
We are staying north of the border today, in Portstewart to be precise. Having had a good look at the photo I am struck by the three hard working (is that the correct word?) men on the middle pier, they seem to be very relaxed and laid back. I am expecting a very precise date range for this photo.

Among the commetary, insights and dating suggestions for this image is confirmation (from the StreetView provided by B-59) that the buildings in the middle of this image have been replaced or otherwise unrecognisable. Thankfully the buildings on the left of Harbour Place and the right of the Promenade remain. One of the other main takeaways from today is how excited we all are for tomorrow's launch of the Photo Detectives exhibition One more sleep indeed :)


Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Catalogue range c.1880-1900

NLI Ref: L_ROY_05579

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 5717
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio thelawrencephotographcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland harbour parade portstewart coderry colondonderry ulster northernireland pier workers hotel shops boats masts srhenry samuelhenry excitement photodetectives harbourplace carrignacule carrignaculehotel winch

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  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 12/Sep/2017 08:41:56

    Samuel Henry, a shopkeeper at Portstewart, gave evidence in a child murder case in 1892. Mrs Montagu, wife of a JP and described by her defence lawyer as a 'strict disciplinarian', was accused of causing the death of her 3-year-old child Helen at their house in Cromore (just outside Portstewart). The incident he witnessed was in July 1890.

    a bread van stopped at his shop with a child of about four years, which the man was to hand over to a policeman, but witness took the boy in and found the name "Daniel" on his cap. The child had three cuts or scars on his head, one of them apparently of recent affliction. The child was one of the Montagu family, and witness sent him home.
    London Times Feb 26, 1892.

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    John Spooner

    • 12/Sep/2017 08:49:04

    .. which is all very well but, about tomorrow: I’m looking forward to it immensely. Despite many trips to Ireland over the years, I’ve never visited Dublin, but having followed NLI’s stream for years I feel as if I know it like the back of my proverbial. As I understand it, when the horse tram drops me in O’Connell St, I just have to make for the Liffey, passing Nelson’s Column Pillar and Lawrence’s Studio, then Clerey’s , the D.B.C. and the smouldering shell of the GPO . If I can resist the temptation to visit Chancellor’s studio and have a ride in his movable boudoir, I turn right at the Gunpowder Office , and go along Bachelor’s Walk (I just hope it isn't too crowded), cross the river via Ha'penny Bridge, look out for a small boy with a toy gun , and I’m nearly there. If I meet these men, it probably means I’m lost, as well as several months too late. What could possibly go wrong?

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 12/Sep/2017 09:00:38

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner] Brilliant, see you tomorrow. Bring some buns from the D.B.C.!!!

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 12/Sep/2017 09:03:07

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner] I managed to evade the security and got a glimpse of the exhibition - in a word it's fantastic!!

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    guliolopez

    • 12/Sep/2017 09:07:40

    Great image! The lads in the middle ground "make it". You'd be forgiven for thinking they were taking it easy - though the meaty looking tools in their hands would seem to suggest otherwise. There's so much going on here, I'm gonna have to take a moment to see if I can find Waldo! :)

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 12/Sep/2017 09:19:14

    Coincidentally, or is it meant, Mr S. R. Henry's horse and cart are spotted front and centre stage in Portrush ... [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/8199886490/in/photolist-XmorKC-duAyzh]

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    Bernard Healy

    • 12/Sep/2017 09:22:45

    Per this page: www.classicbuses.co.uk/+Henry2.html [T]the Carrig-na-Cule Hotel and ground level shops were built c.1881 and operated by Mr. and Mrs. S. R. Henry. Not much of a help in dating other than to confirm the 1880 lower bound on this photo.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 12/Sep/2017 09:35:07

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] I had looked at the photo you refer to, but completely missed the Henry connection.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 12/Sep/2017 09:42:03

    Mr. Henry in the 1901 census.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 12/Sep/2017 09:44:34

    I count 4 bicycles - suggests 1890s rather than 1880s.

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    Bernard Healy

    • 12/Sep/2017 09:44:44

    The registration numbers on the boats indicate that they're registered in Coleraine (CE) and Londonderry (LY). I haven't been able to turn up a list of registered vessels that might help us identify or date them, though.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 12/Sep/2017 09:50:06

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] I note on the 1901 census you reference that there is a visitor John G. English who is described as Head Constable of the Royal Irish Constabulary. Edit - looking at the chain of command of the RIC Head Constable is a relatively low rank.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 12/Sep/2017 09:55:18

    I see tramlines! (see note) "Services started around 21 June 1882, a few days in advance of the arrival of the formal permission from the Board of Trade on 28 June 1882. Two tram engines were obtained from Kitson and Company. The tramway went into liquidation in 1897 and was purchased for £2,100 (equivalent to £215,000 in 2015)[2] by the Belfast and Northern Counties Railway. They invested in the tramway providing some additional passenger vehicles and a new steam tramway engine. A new depot was constructed in Portstewart by the railway engineer Berkeley Deane Wise in 1899, at the southern end of the promenade, opposite the Town Hall." From - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portstewart_Tramway Is this after the 1899 "new depot"?

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    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 12/Sep/2017 10:18:44

    And no sight of any canines. Clearly, a dog-fearing society

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 12/Sep/2017 10:40:08

    Tram spotted in this one which must be at the same time due to the notices in Mr Henry's windows. Can anyone see the tram depot? - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000321523 [Ed. Ooops - fixed]

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 12/Sep/2017 10:40:32

    In this Lawrence shot in the archive, the Hotel looks identical (down to the posters in the window and billboard on the pavement), but further along to the right we can see the Methodist Church half ruined. This history page says "Part of the original parapets, which were the central feature of the roof, crashed through it in a storm in 1884. The remainder was not removed until 1912. So definitely after 1884.

  • profile

    guliolopez

    • 12/Sep/2017 10:48:20

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] RE:

    I managed to evade the security and got a glimpse of the exhibition - in a word it's fantastic!!
    It certainly looks it. Looking forward to it all the more. Delighted to see the Barriscale Clock/Bridge Street image made the cut :)

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 12/Sep/2017 10:59:17

    Hmm, maybe withdrawing that last - here is a mislabelled closeup of that church, and the bit I thought was ruined is the aforementioned parapet as originally (and extremely oddly !) designed. So all we can say from the church is before 1912, which we already knew.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 12/Sep/2017 11:06:47

    More about the Henrys who were also big in transport around there - www.classicbuses.co.uk/+Henry2.html

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 12/Sep/2017 11:07:36

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Will you be travelling yourself?

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    Bernard Healy

    • 12/Sep/2017 11:14:30

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] Hope to be there myself! :)

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 12/Sep/2017 11:15:10

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy] See you there Bernard.

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    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 12/Sep/2017 12:34:23

    One more sleep!

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    B-59

    • 12/Sep/2017 12:37:48

    The only remaining buildings at the Promenade: Streetview

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 12/Sep/2017 21:59:10

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Re. No canines - probably due to the lack of trees. And lamp posts.