National Museum, Dublin City, Co. Dublin

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Where: 23 Kildare St, Dublin, Ireland

When: Unknown

Library Towers stands on one side, the National Museum stands on the other and the adage "Oh, East is East, and West is West, and never the twain shall meet" applies! A very old view of the Museum which will never be seen again.

Something we also won't see again is the "fire escape station" we see in the centre. Our intrepid Flickroonies confirm that this public safety equipment wasn't just "left lying around" like so much street furniture. Often manned, it was quickly brought to bear when needed. Certainly quicker than if transported from a distance - without the assistance of the 13 tonne engines the Dublin Fire Brigade has today. Thankfully (as far as we know), it was never needed to deal with threats to the National Museum's collonaded facade (or indeed its collections)....


Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Catalogue range c.1865-1914. Possible after c.1901 (streetlamp)

NLI Ref: L_ROY_07311

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 19736
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio thelawrencephotographcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland nationalmuseumofireland kildarestreet dublin leinsterhouse artifacts exhibits historical explore nationalmuseum ladder fireescape lamppost columns firesafety pole bollard colonnade corinthiancolumns pediments balustrade niche parapet urns fireescapestation

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  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 25/Aug/2017 08:01:29

    Oooh, another fire ladder! marked on the 25" as a Fire Escape. Trees now obscure this aspect in streetview

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 25/Aug/2017 08:29:36

    A set of fire ladders in Kingstown in the archive, and another in Monkstown

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    Niall McAuley

    • 25/Aug/2017 08:35:58

    In this Bing bird's eye view, you can see that the long building with a skylight at right is the dead zoo.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 25/Aug/2017 08:41:21

    Dating detail: swan necked lamp-post at left means after 1901 and tram electrification. No actual light on the lamp-post may mean it is during electrification works.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 25/Aug/2017 08:52:35

    (Unlike many other streets, the swan necked lamp posts are still there in streetview).

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 25/Aug/2017 09:18:00

    According to this Trove snippet, the "Dublin Museum" became the "National Museum of Science and Art" on the orders of Count Plunkett, the director, in August 1908 - trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/111283371

  • profile

    Wendy:

    • 25/Aug/2017 09:52:52

    lovely view of it--deserves to be seen again!!

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 25/Aug/2017 10:15:12

    And seen again it is here - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000041285 - with the 1901* statue of Archbishop William Conyngham Plunket (1828-97). Mr French/Lawrence managed to avoid the statue in the top photo, but there is a loitering bollard bottom right. * - "An admirably lifelike statue by Hamo Thorneycroft was unveiled in Dublin on 16 April 1901 by the viceroy, Earl Cadogan." From - en.wikisource.org/wiki/Plunket,_William_Conyngham_(1828-1897)_(DNB01)

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 25/Aug/2017 11:53:42

    fancy place.

  • profile

    @PAkDocK / www.pakdock.com

    • 26/Aug/2017 19:04:21

    Very nice indeed. Keep up the good work

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 27/Aug/2017 00:20:21

    Thanks [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] and [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia]. After pouring the contents of an architectural dictionary into the tags (from pediments to niches to ballustrades to columns), I tweaked the date range slightly :) Thanks also Niall for the reminder on the previous examples of semi-permanent building fire-safety equipment. Do we think the nearby pole (with it's apparent steps) has a similar purpose? Perhaps for a lithe fireman to climb - for a better hose angle?

  • profile

    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 27/Aug/2017 11:13:32

    These "Fire Escape Stations" were not just equipment left parked for anyone to use in an emergency - they were manned 24/7 and had telephone connectivity - hence that pole. Though its odd that none of the three stations mentioned here had any structure to protect the "conductor" (as they were termed) from the elements. If it was intended that someone might scale the pole for height advantage, it would have made sense to erect some sort of resting framework at the top (instead of a spike).

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    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 27/Aug/2017 11:21:24

    for example . . Untitled-1_5.psd

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    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 27/Aug/2017 11:29:57

    and another one at Wood Quay suffered storm damage . . . Untitled-1_6.psd

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 28/Aug/2017 23:40:38

    Excellent - thanks [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]]. I've added "Fire Escape Stations" to the tags (and a short note to the description). Great to have confirmation on what role the pole had to play!

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    Dr. Ilia

    • 30/Aug/2017 08:00:07

    wonderful shot!