Cloghleigh Castle, Moorepark, Fermoy, Co. Cork

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Where: R639, Co. Cork, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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Back to North Cork today to near Fermoy. These fortified households are dotted all around the island and calling them castles appears to be a bit of an over-inflation. This one looks very big in comparison with others I know, I wonder what makes this one so interesting?

And, we learned, what makes this one interesting is its bloody past. The original builders of this tower house were the Norman De Caunton family. Later known as the Condons, they sided with the Earl of Desmond in the 1580s during the Desmond Rebellion. On the losing side, they were forced to surrender their estates in 1588. They regained the castle for a period - only to see it taken over by the Fleetwood family in 1622. During the particularly bloody Eleven Years War (aka the Confederate Wars in Ireland), the Condons retook the castle again - decimating the surrendering Fleetwoods. The Condon return was short lived however as, in 1643, English forces retook the castle and its Condon occupants were "put to the sword". Many of *these* English soliders however were killed in the subsequent Battle of Cloghleagh. The castle may have been in the possession of the War Department when this image was captured....


Photographer: Unknown

Collection: Eason Photographic Collection

Date: Catalogue range c.1900-1939

NLI Ref: EAS_0896

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 3039
eason easonson easoncollection easonphotographiccollection glassnegative 20thcentury nationallibraryofireland cloghleighcastle moorepark fermoy cocork fortifiedtower fortifiedhousehold limestone kilworth castle wrs william ritchie sons towerhouse condon countycork cloghleagh cloghleaghcastle riverfunshion garderobe

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    swordscookie back and trying to catch up!

    • 26/Oct/2017 08:21:59

    It looks as if it was inhabited at that stage, whenever that might have been!

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    Rory_Sherlock

    • 26/Oct/2017 08:22:33

    Cloghleigh is a large tower house, generally typical of those in Munster, and it probably dates to the sixteenth century. It has distinctive rounded corners and a number of interesting horizontal loops. It is on the Teagasc farm at Moorepark and the interior was not accessible when last I visited it. Originally a castle of the Condons, it eventually passed to the Moores, who made repairs to it in the nineteenth century.

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    B-59

    • 26/Oct/2017 08:30:12

    It has a bloody history, according to www.abandonedireland.com/Cloghleagh.html

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 26/Oct/2017 08:45:15

    Quite good - youtu.be/sZPAGY5OotE?t=14m47s (from 14:48)

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    B-59

    • 26/Oct/2017 08:53:12

    See also www.geograph.org.uk/photo/3036887

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 26/Oct/2017 08:53:17

    Flickr is sometimes amazing - in 2011 via [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/][https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/6801559048/]

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    Bernard Healy

    • 26/Oct/2017 10:11:56

    An earlier picture catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000044849/MooviewerImg?mobile...

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    sam2cents

    • 26/Oct/2017 10:44:09

    If the American tourists are happy to call them castles, that's okay with me ; ) But, in truth they are more like something Saruman would have lived in, towers sort of like early skyscrapers. I wonder if those windows could be described as 'energy efficient'. It makes a lovely image and the colour shots Beachcomber has linked to really show the beautiful surrounding landscape, albeit in winter.

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    sam2cents

    • 26/Oct/2017 10:49:57

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] I just read your history link and it seems to have been very much a castle. It's interesting how many common Norman Irish names are among the 'English' contingent. I suppose we can assume these would have been Royalists, considering the time just a few years prior to Cromwell's campaign in Ireland.

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    toureasy47201

    • 26/Oct/2017 15:06:43

    It would seem karma was alive and well in the history of Cloghleigh Castle. Thank you B-59 for the history link.

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    guliolopez

    • 26/Oct/2017 20:00:04

    Does the young lad's garb help us with dating? (Probably not I guess - young fellas pretty much wore the same jackets and caps for 50 years). What is going on on front of the young fella though? Looks like some weird masking or "photoshopping" (and too "even" to be random damage)?

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    derangedlemur

    • 27/Oct/2017 07:07:46

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/sam2cents] Asymetric arrow conductors is, I think, what they're actually intended to be.

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    sam2cents

    • 27/Oct/2017 10:44:38

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] I suspected as much. There are some old farmyards here in Wicklow which are built to a courtyard shape, and the outer walls have arrow /musket slits in them. There's a touch of Fort Apache to them. By the way, is that a toilet shute at the bottom of the tower?

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 27/Oct/2017 11:06:04

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/sam2cents] Yes, it's a garderobe - see the YouTube video link above at about 19:23. What goes up must come down!

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    sam2cents

    • 27/Oct/2017 13:29:01

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] Thanks! 'Garderobe' sounds way too nice a word for it. I'll check that link out. Down is preferable to up in that case. I don't think they were too popular in Japan - there's a legend of a 17th century Ninja climbing up one of those to assassinate a warlord. I doubt anyone ever tried it in Ireland, but I could be wrong.

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    derangedlemur

    • 27/Oct/2017 13:58:56

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/sam2cents] Someone got stabbed through the garderobe in Ireland but I forget who or where; might have been Trim castle.

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    sam2cents

    • 27/Oct/2017 14:17:30

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Ouch! That is a horror story if ever there was one. If it comes to mind let me know, but I'll have a search about and see if there's any records on the web.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 27/Oct/2017 20:00:16

    Flickr Gallery "Medieval Plumbing, or, The Glory of the Garderobe" www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/galleries/721576229685...

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 28/Oct/2017 20:17:07

    Thanks all for the input! It was hard to keep-up with the successive surrender/recapture/loss cycles surrounding with the castle (and accompanying massarce and retribution). However, I've tried to include a summary in the description. I am struck that, in the dusty descriptions (of dates and battles) its easy to forget that these were very real and messy events. Perhaps we'll find something less scary - before Halloween :)

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    Dr. Ilia

    • 01/Nov/2017 10:00:07

    Wonderful details!