Right leaning chimneys in Rathdowney!

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Where: The Bridge House, Main St, Rathdowney, Co. Laois, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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The week is off to a rocky start with visit to a brewery first thing on Monday morning. This fine Royal plate from the Lawrence Collection, taken on a still day, shows a fine enterprise seemingly in full swing. Those chimney vents are interesting. and I suspect that they were under the influence of the wind to take away the vapours? I never heard of a brewery in Rathdowney and it will be interesting to read what can be dug up!

The "leaning chimney cowls" are confirmed to be of a type that turned with the wind - so obviously weren't always angled to the right :) Our contributors also tell us that Perry's Brewery dates back to 1800 - and looks very similar in this 1832 illustration. The suggestion, though not absolute, is that this image may date from around 1900 - based on the dates attributed to other Lawrence/French images of the area....


Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Catalogue range c.1865-1914. Perhaps after c.1900

NLI Ref: L_ROY_10403

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 7343
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio thelawrencephotographcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland brewery rathdowney colaois queenscounty chimneys vents windmills oast house cowl hop perry perrys robertperry duck

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 29/Jan/2018 08:37:03

    POINT OF INFORMATION On Wednesday 31st January 2018 the NLI Flickr Photostream with all the research and information gathered will be archived. The Irish Web has been archived by the NLI over the past several years and this has led to the archiving of the photostream. Carol has been linking the information gathered on each shot to the catalogue and now the archiving will ensure that it is preserved for future reference for those who may wish to research!

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    domenico milella

    • 29/Jan/2018 08:59:09

    Congratulation for your beautiful Album.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 29/Jan/2018 09:03:47

    "An oast, oast house or hop kiln is a building designed for kilning (drying) hops as part of the brewing process. They can be found in most hop-growing (and former hop-growing) areas and are often good examples of vernacular architecture. ... They consist of a rectangular one or two storey building (the "stowage") and one or more kilns in which the hops were spread out to be dried by hot air rising from a wood or charcoal-fired below. The drying floors were thin and perforated to permit the heat to pass through and escape through a cowl in the roof which turned with the wind. The freshly picked hops from the fields were raked in to dry and then raked out to cool before being bagged up and sent to the brewery. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oast_house

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 29/Jan/2018 09:11:01

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] Wednesday January 31 (2018) is also a a super Blue Moon total eclipse, the first in 150 years - earthsky.org/?p=270280 . Lock up your archives!

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    Carol Maddock

    • 29/Jan/2018 09:21:41

    FATAL ACCIDENT AT RATHDOWNEY BREWERY On Friday night at about 8 o'clock an employee of Messrs R Perry & Co, the Brewery, Rathdowney, named Joseph Murray, lost his life under very sad circumstances. It appears that the barley in No 2 kiln, where he was engaged, was being emptied into a bin underneath, and he, it is assumed, believing that the bin would not contain all the barley, got in to calk [sic] it. While he was doing so another workman, ignorant of Murray's presence there, drew the slide to allow the corn to pass into another receptacle, and Murray was carried into the aperture, which was immediately closed by the man below. The remaining portion of the barley, about 60 barrels, came toppling down on the unfortunate man, who was buried beneath it. A number of his fellow workers who were immediately told of the occurrence had the pile of corn removed as quickly as possible, but when the body was extricated life was found to be extinct.
    (Leinster Express, Saturday, 3 November 1906)

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    i-lenticularis

    • 29/Jan/2018 09:26:40

    A very sad accident.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 29/Jan/2018 09:29:08

    History of Perry's Brewery (1800-1966) - www.askaboutireland.ie/reading-room/history-heritage/heri...

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    Carol Maddock

    • 29/Jan/2018 09:29:45

    This snippet is from 1910. Are we looking at "old" or "new" brewery or both?

    Proposed New Brewery in Rathdowney From enquiries made our representative has been informed from a reliable source that Messrs Robert Perry and Son, Ltd, are about building a new brewery adjacent to their premises at Rathdowney. The trade has been increasing for some years past owing to the excellent quality of their ale and the existing premises are found to be inadequate to cope with the present output. We have also good reason to believe that most of the work will be done by local labour and that as far as it will be possible, Irish manufacture will be used in its construction and equipment, which will probably run into some thousands.
    (Nationalist and Leinster Times, Saturday, 24 September 1910)

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    Carol Maddock

    • 29/Jan/2018 09:39:04

    And couldn't resist this one! Can you imagine the To-Do? Wonder how Mr M'Dougall was tracked down to Rathdowney, and was the JP Mr Perry his employer Perry or another member of the brewing family...

    A SCOTSMAN DEPORTED HOME AND FINED FOR WIFE-DESERTION Great excitement was caused recently in Rathdowney by the removal of William Wallace M'Dougall, in custody of an officer of the Scottish Courts, to Kirkcudbright, to be tried on a charge of having deserted his wife and four children about two years ago. M'Dougall held the responsible position of Gas Manager in the employment of the Rathdowney Brewery Company. Mr Perry, J.P., before whom he was brought, made out the conduct warrant authorising his conveyance to Scotland. He has since been ordered by the local Court to pay a fine of £5 or submit to imprisonment for 30 days.
    (Leinster Leader, Saturday, 6 June 1903)

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    Niall McAuley

    • 29/Jan/2018 09:46:49

    Here is Alfred William Perry in 1901: JP and Director of Brewery Company Lt

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    Niall McAuley

    • 29/Jan/2018 09:55:47

    By 1911, he is married, and just lists JP as occupation.

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    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 29/Jan/2018 09:57:36

    and the following year . . . Marriages PERRY - WALLACE - March 19. At Rathdowney Church, Queens County by the Rev. John Pim assisted by the Rev. W.B. Fry, Rector of the parish, Alfred William Perry, Erkindale, Rathdowney to Geraldine, Widow of the late John Wallace, Knockfin, Rathdowney (Newry Reporter 25 March 1902)

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    mym

    • 29/Jan/2018 09:58:02

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] nicer sky in 2009 though: www.google.co.uk/maps/@52.8555158,-7.5845027,3a,75y,8.27h...

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    mym

    • 29/Jan/2018 10:01:13

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] that doesn't mean no more pics here does it?

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    John Spooner

    • 29/Jan/2018 10:05:19

    Leinster Leader 1930s Leinster Leader - Saturday 11 February 1933

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    Niall McAuley

    • 29/Jan/2018 10:11:23

    L_ROY_10399 is nearby in catalog number and geography, and there I see a c.1900 pub and an ad for Pratt's Motor Spirit, I'm guessing it is after 1900...

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 29/Jan/2018 10:27:06

    Interesting 1870 glowing description of the brewery, including about the then-being-built Eastholme house, planned use of "road steamers" (traction engines?), a rant about the quality of Irish beers, etc. Originally from the Waterford News - trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/224541950?searchTerm=p...

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    Niall McAuley

    • 29/Jan/2018 10:38:56

    Everything from 10396 to 10402 is in Rathdowney. L_ROY_10398 is the Square in Rathdowney again, and I see an ad for Raglan Cycle (Company founded in 1896). Also an add for Melotte, the World's best Cream Seperator, very similar to this 1908 ad

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    sam2cents

    • 29/Jan/2018 12:18:30

    Those chimneys give the scene a steampunk look. Very interesting and unusual.

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    wanderingshanedotcom

    • 29/Jan/2018 12:21:54

    Very little left of it today.

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    guliolopez

    • 29/Jan/2018 13:36:36

    L_ROY_10398 is close by (both geographically and numerically), and was previously dated to around 1900. www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/8166240548/

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 29/Jan/2018 14:33:54

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/mymuk] Rest assured that we will continue to post but now the valuable research work done by our daring Detectives will be preserved for posterity! The great thing about the activity on this stream is that it is bringing life to old images and information long lost is being resurrected once again. We find it quite addictive!

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    Rory_Sherlock

    • 29/Jan/2018 14:36:27

    The 1901 census lists one John E. Tomlinson, Brewery Director, living in The Square, Rathdowney with his family. They were obviously living in some comfort - their house was owned by Robert Perry, had 24 rooms, a total of 22 windows in its main facade and no less than 14 out-offices etc. - Perhaps they were living in Eastholme House which was is visible in the photo behind some of the brewery buildings? www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001164290/ www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001164269/

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    mym

    • 29/Jan/2018 14:37:56

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] me too, thanks for clarifying!

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    Salty Windows

    • 29/Jan/2018 20:27:40

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Where did all the water go? Have a look at the street view version August 2009. It's obviously not tidal. A wet month too!

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    mickyman13

    • 29/Jan/2018 21:38:01

    It is the vent on a oast house which was made to be able to turn and stop the wind blowing in. A oast house or hop kiln is a building designed for kilning (drying) hops as part of the brewing process. They can be found in most hop-growing (and former hop-growing) areas and are often good examples of vernacular architecture. Many redundant oasts have been converted into houses. The names oast and oast house are used interchangeably in Kent and East Sussex. In Surrey, Hampshire, Hereford and Worcester they are always called hop kilns. Loads of info at. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oast_house

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    Rory_Sherlock

    • 30/Jan/2018 09:09:31

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gerrydunne] The water was flowing from south to north (i.e. away from the camera in this image) - it went from this mill pond under the brewery. It's easier to see it on the 6" map as the water has been hand-coloured blue: maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V2,628027,678292,11,7

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    Niall McAuley

    • 30/Jan/2018 10:48:25

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Interesting - many mill races were built by having a weir on a river and taking water from above it into the mill race, but this one takes a whole small stream, unnamed even on these maps, and builds ponds and a race on it before it empties into the Erkina River. A bigger risk that the race might run low or out of water this way, i would think.

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    Salty Windows

    • 30/Jan/2018 23:27:19

    Given that the mill no longer exists I was intrigued as to what happened the water in 2009. July 2009: www.google.co.uk/maps/@52.8555147,-7.5843961,3a,75y,345.4... August 2009: www.google.co.uk/maps/@52.8555338,-7.5843433,3a,75y,314.3...

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 31/Jan/2018 00:13:18

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gerrydunne] It looks like someone opened the sluice gate in the far left corner to lower the water level - for desilting perhaps? www.google.co.uk/maps/@52.8559211,-7.5844298,3a,15y,313.0... SAVE THE DUCKS !

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 31/Jan/2018 00:25:22

    Flickr is sometimes amazing - a bit weedy and seedy in 2014 via [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] !! [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/14600469591/]

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    Salty Windows

    • 31/Jan/2018 20:59:04

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] Very impressive spot Beachcomber! Desilting? Weed control? Flood control? Vandalism? Disease control (discouraging swimmers)?