Pier, Ballyvaughan, Co. Clare

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Where: R477, Co. Clare, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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We stay in County Clare and with the Lawrence Collection for the last photo of the week. For a while, Ballyvaughan was the official capital of this region of Clare, sporting its own workhouse, coastguard station and a large police barracks. The small boat on the left looks like a Galway Hooker to me, what do you think?

Almost single handedly, B-59 helped refine the range, identify a key subject, and pinpoint the location. The date (previously a 50 year catalogue range from the 1860s to 1910s) is likely to be between the mid-1890s and early-1910s. This is based on the fact that the main identified subject (the steamer S.S. Duras) seemingly ran cargo and passenger services to this per (confirmed as at Ballyvaughan, Co Clare) from after 1893 to before 1912. Thanks B-59!


Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Catalogue range c.1865-1914. Likely c.1893-1912 ("SS Duras" service range)

NLI Ref: L_ROY_04086

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 7465
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio thelawrencephotographcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland pier ballyvaughan coclare clare munster galwayhooker people crew boats lifeboat duras galwaybay steamboat galwaybaysteamboatcompany finavarratower martellotower finavarramartellotower countyclare ssduras steamer aranislands cargo jaunty

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  • profile

    B-59

    • 20/Apr/2018 07:15:49

    The Duras was in service from 1893 to 1912. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galway_Bay_Steamboat_Company www.kennys.ie/News/OldGalway/06032003-SSDuras/

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    B-59

    • 20/Apr/2018 07:20:02

    Streetview

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    B-59

    • 20/Apr/2018 07:27:21

    OSI 25"

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 20/Apr/2018 07:31:44

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] You are playing a blinder today!

  • profile

    sissonni

    • 20/Apr/2018 07:35:08

    You can just see the Finavarra Martello Tower in the background

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 20/Apr/2018 07:41:35

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] I was wondering what the Building was, thanks.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 20/Apr/2018 07:44:44

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Does your link suggest that the Duras only started to visit Ballyvaughan in the Summer of 1898?

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 20/Apr/2018 07:46:27

    The Duras was mentioned before in this Aran Island photo. [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/16578581118]

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    domenico milella

    • 20/Apr/2018 07:47:24

    Congratulation for your beautiful Album.

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    Wendy:

    • 20/Apr/2018 07:52:19

    great POV to combine with Martello tower!

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    John Spooner

    • 20/Apr/2018 07:54:55

    The quay looks much more solid than it would have done in November 1850, when "A Subscriber" wrote to the Clare Journal, and Ennis Advertiser pointing out that the quay, constructed a few years earlier (but without a "protection wall as a breakwater"), was in such a state of disrepair that

    The Galway and Connemara fishing boats invariably put into Ballyvaughan harbour during severe weather - their boats riding the storm at anchor, not daring to moor them alongside the quay so insecure.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 20/Apr/2018 07:58:37

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner] John, I see on the OSI 25 that there is another pier just a little east, I wonder which one they are talking about in your extract?

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    abandoned railways

    • 20/Apr/2018 07:59:51

    The 4 classes of Hooker, from large to small, are Bád Mór, Leathbhád, Púcán and Gleoiteog.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 20/Apr/2018 08:02:10

    I found John Hill the Engineer of the SS Duras in the 1901 Census, I wonder if we can see him in this photo?

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 20/Apr/2018 08:03:06

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/abandonedrailsireland] Fred do you think this is one of them?

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    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Apr/2018 08:36:09

    John Hill is still a Marine Engineer in 1911, but is staying with the outlaws in Ranelagh

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    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Apr/2018 08:40:04

    Two very affluent types up on the wheelhouse with the captain.

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    John Spooner

    • 20/Apr/2018 08:54:59

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] According to wikipedia, quays were built in 1829 and 1837, and a newspaper article in 1844 looks forward to a proposed development of the harbour, but the 1850 letter implies there is only one quay.

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    John Spooner

    • 20/Apr/2018 09:07:28

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] Three not-so-distinguished passengers of the Duras in 1911 were men suspected of the murder of Patrick Connelly on South Arran. One of the three (Francis Flaherty) was later removed from Galway Jail to Ballinasloe Lunatic Asylum.

    He had shown signs of insanity for some time past, and had become violent in jail. The first symptoms were noticed on this day week during the journey to Galway on the ss Duras
    (reported in Roscommon Messenger - Saturday 01 July 1911 and elsewhere)

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 20/Apr/2018 09:37:04

    Flickr is sometimes amazing! In 2009 via [https://www.flickr.com/photos/vanessakennedy/] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/vanessakennedy/3961935841/] And the 'Happy Hooker' in 2012 via [https://www.flickr.com/photos/notenoughrice/] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/notenoughrice/6911180572/]

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    sissonni

    • 20/Apr/2018 09:38:13

    Just looking through the 1901 census. Ballyvaughan is in Drumcreehy DED and there are four men living nearby with their occupation list as "Fisherman" or "Seaman" - www.census.nationalarchives.ie/search/results.jsp?searchM...

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 20/Apr/2018 10:45:07

    I spy with my little eye, someone beginning with J..... ? [see note]

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 20/Apr/2018 10:50:05

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] You Might be right!!

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 20/Apr/2018 10:51:54

    flags say DURA something. one at the back would be a British enseign (red background with Union Jack in the corner) to identify her as British

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    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Apr/2018 13:48:53

    L_ROY_04085 next door is also Ballyvaughan: Ballyvaughan, Co. Clare

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    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Apr/2018 13:54:29

    I don't see McNamara's Hotel in 1901 or 1911 census, but it was in ballyvaughan later, in 1942

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    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Apr/2018 13:56:57

    "McNamara’s Hotel on the shore featured in many nineteenth century guide books." So perhaps it kept the name even while the Davies were running it (in the census).

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    John Spooner

    • 20/Apr/2018 15:12:06

    A mail car from McNamara's Hotel Ballyvaughan to Ryan's Hotel Oranmore was advertised in the Clare Journal, and Ennis Advertiser as early as 1854. "The fares will be found moderate, and the accommodation ample, as well for parcels, as for passengers."

  • profile

    abandoned railways

    • 20/Apr/2018 20:44:54

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] This looks like a Leathbhád, Its decked forward covered by tarpuline here.

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    domenico milella

    • 21/Apr/2018 08:23:02

    Congratulation for your beautiful Album - Nice Week End. Ciao.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 21/Apr/2018 08:26:48

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/abandonedrailsireland] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Thank you. And thanks also to [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]]. Whose inputs I've attempted to summarise in the description/etc!

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    Inverarra

    • 21/Apr/2018 12:41:50

    We have seen many a fine photo of the boats that sailed Galway Bay in the past but this is one of the best. Many thanks.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 22/Apr/2018 08:51:36

    This other photo - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000333898 - "General View, Ballyvaughan, Co. Clare", look like it was taken from the end of this pier, at a height, at high tide, and in a westerly wind ... probably from the 'Duras' ? The church and two-hole bridge line up. Betting that Mr French / Lawrence was on a maiden voyage publicity tour for the new ship (hence the Duras flag) in 1893. The locals are dragged out for a sticky-beak, and the proud owners and Ministers for Gravy Trains are posed on the ship's bridge staring directly at the camera. Or not? Is there anything in the local newspapers from 1893?

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 22/Apr/2018 10:43:26

    A few more clues from a book 'Liffey Ships and Shipbuilding' - "... In 1893 a new steamer specially built in South Shields was delivered to the Galway Bay Steamship Company. Named Duras and only 96 in length, she was named after the residence of Major J. Wilson Lynch, the chairman of the Congested Districts Board. An indication of the vessel's priorities was given when the master of a sailing ship complained that the Galway vessel would not tow his ship. The master was quickly informed by the harbour master that the steamer's job was the carriage of fish and not towage ..." From - books.google.com.au/books?id=oHApwGBIc5gC&pg=PA89&... Major John Wilson Lynch (1831 - 1929) "John Wilson Lynch, of Duras and Renmore had a very distinguished career. He was an honorary major in the Galway Militia, a justice of the peace for Galway town and County Clare, high sheriff for Galway in 1858 and for County Clare in 1866, and again for County Galway in 1870. His wife was Frances, daughter of Sir Thomas Redington, KCB, of Kilcornan, whom he married in 1865. Their children included Mark (b 1866, d 1892); Thomas David (b 1870, d 1947); William Patrick; Ellen; and Frances, or Fanny. Landowners in Co. Galway, circa 1870s". From - genealogy.links.org/links-cgi/readged?/home/ben/camilla-g...

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    murphman61

    • 27/Apr/2018 23:25:56

    My shot from 2015. Why I cut off the stern of the sailboat is beyond me. [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/26417830566/in/album-72157659885102521/]

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    Dr. Ilia

    • 30/Apr/2018 08:00:07

    Cool shot