Clonhugh, Mullingar, Co. Westmeath

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Where: Unnamed Road, Knightswood, Co. Westmeath, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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From the moving statue of King Billy to a big, a very big, house outside Mullingar in County Westmeath. This large building with extensions looks like yet another country house converted into a convent or school. Am I right?

Morning Mary I have to tell you you are wrong! Within minutes Niall McAuley told us that the house is currently a private dwelling. Messers French and Lawrence are also incorrect with their spelling, it is in fact Clonhugh not Clonugh as on the face of the photograph.

I love the story posted by BeachcomberAustralia from 1891, under the heading

DOG BITES LORD GREVILLE

Lord Greville, I am sorry to learn, was bitten the other day by a dog at Clonhugh, his lordship's seat in County Westmeath.
The popular peer left Ireland immediately, and travelled "right away" to Paris, there to place himself under the care of M. Pasteur. By this time I hope he is completely cured........


We are presuming that he visited the one and only Louis Pasteur who discovered pasteurisation and also developed a vaccination for anthrax and rabies, again we are presuming the rabies jabs were the object of the dash to Paris by Lord Greville.

Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Catalogue range c.1865-1914. Likely 1870s

NLI Ref: L_ROY_05226

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 5161
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio thelawrencephotographcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland clonugh mullingar cowestmeath clonhugh dogbiteslordgreville lordgreville dog paris louispasteur pasteurisation anthrax rabies 1870’s mccall fulkesouthwellgrevillenugent 1stbarongrevilleofclonyn algernonwilliamfulkegreville 2ndbarongreville dogbitesman

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  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Mar/2018 08:59:47

    Clonhugh House, I think (25" link). Per the NIAH: Detached five-bay two-storey Italianate country house, built in 1867, with projecting single-bay pedimented breakfront and projecting Ionic entrance porch to centre. Various two-storey extensions to the northwest. Now in use as a private dwelling.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Mar/2018 09:06:46

    One Mr. E.W. Hope-Johnstone MFH commissioned a number of Poole shots in the archive, sadly not digitized yet.

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 06/Mar/2018 09:08:13

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] A 1948 aerial view for confirmation.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Mar/2018 09:10:15

    The 1901 census says it belonged to Lord Greville, but only staff in residence.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Mar/2018 09:12:27

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet] The greenhouse in that 1948 shot is on the 25" but not here, so we are before the 25" survey of 1911.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Mar/2018 09:15:30

    When the NIAH says "Various two-storey extensions to the northwest", I think it has things reversed. Flipping from the 1830s 6" to the 1911 25", we can see that those structures are older than the main house, belonging to the yard of the earlier house here.

  • profile

    Rory_Sherlock

    • 06/Mar/2018 09:16:39

    E.W. Hope-Johnstone, mentioned by Niall McAuley, was Master of the Westmeath Hunt (i.e. MFH) from 1913 to 1924. Clonhugh seems to have featured frequently in the history of the Westmeath Hunt - the hunt met there in 1855 when it was the home of Col Fulke Greville M.P. Later, in the early 1870s, the MFH was Capt Reginald Greville-Nugent of Clonhugh. www.askaboutireland.ie/reading-room/digital-book-collecti...

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Mar/2018 09:17:26

    More people here in 1911, but still no Lord Greville.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Mar/2018 09:22:20

    The house looks pretty new here, but there is an 8ft tall creeper at right, so I'd guess we are in the 1870s.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 06/Mar/2018 09:24:50

    Flickr is sometimes amazing! In 2016 via [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] - one of a series of personal family photos, and the only one showing the outside of the building, possibly the two windows to the left of the door on the left side (see megazoom) - [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/27926846745/] Others - www.flickr.com/search/?text=clonhugh

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 06/Mar/2018 09:27:23

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] I'm impressed at the 9 month old who can apparently read...

  • profile

    Rory_Sherlock

    • 06/Mar/2018 09:31:47

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] Reginald Greville-Nugent was killed in a race at Sandown Park in 1878, so it would be interesting to know who owned / lived in the house from then until the 1911 census when the McCalls were in residence. Edit: Looking at the House & Building Return portion of the 1911 census, the house was still owned by Lord Greville even though the McCalls were in residence. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reginald_Greville-Nugent

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 06/Mar/2018 09:33:21

    Westmeath County Library also has a copy of this photo.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 06/Mar/2018 09:39:17

    It was bought by the Harvey-Kelly family in 1927.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 06/Mar/2018 10:59:37

    1891 - DOG BITES LORD GREVILLE ...

    Lord Greville, I am sorry to learn, was bitten the other day by a dog at Clonhugh, his lordship's seat in County Westmeath. The popular peer left Ireland immediately, and travelled "right away" to Paris, there to place himself under the care of M. Pasteur. By this time I hope he is completely cured. But the dog which had bitten him was "subsequently killed". Did the animal exhibit symptoms of rabies or was it only slain through credence in the very ancient superstition, the principle of which is embodied in the French proverb, "Morte la bête, mort le venin"?
    From trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/8485659?searchTerm=clo...

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 06/Mar/2018 11:16:15

    More press cuttings - 1887 - Greville supports Home Rule - trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/169705032?searchTerm=c... 1910 - His will - trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5240592?searchTerm=clo... 1911 - Coronation celebrations - trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/111094258?searchTerm=c... "On the invitation of Lord Greville, a large company was sumptuously entertained at Clonhugh, Co. Westmeath, in honour of the Coronation [of George V], and a tar-barrel bonfire, was lighted on the Kilpatrick Hill."

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Mar/2018 12:18:58

    The house was built for Fulke Southwell Greville-Nugent, later 1st Baron Greville of Clonyn. The Lord Greville referenced in the census is his son Algernon William Fulke Greville, 2nd Baron Greville, born 1841, and "Lord Greville" from 1883 to 1908.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 06/Mar/2018 20:18:16

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Thanks for all the work today, much appreciated.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 06/Mar/2018 21:20:15

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] The author of that chatty story about Lord Greville and the dog was George Augustus Sala, who knew everybody and was evidently huge in his day - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Augustus_Sala

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 07/Mar/2018 00:02:30

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] Very good.