Tennis Court (with slight obstruction) in Boyle

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Where: 9 N61, Knocknashee, Co. Roscommon, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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Back to the old reliable Lawrence Collection today and a visit to the beautiful town of Boyle in County Roscommon. Titled "Tennis Court, Boyle" this image appears to be more about the statue than the tennis court in the background but don't let the truth get in the way of a good story :-)

And indeed it was/is a good story. This statue, of King William III, had been moved to this location (from a nearby bridge) in the early 19th century. As with other memorials to King Billy, it suffered several defacements, before being entirely removed entirely before the 1930s. The general consensus is that this image dates to before 1905 - when the statue was seemingly beheaded. The pedestal remains, and is a landmark in the surrounding parkland and "Boyle pleasure grounds"....


Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Catalogue range c.1865-1914. Before 1905 (statue)

NLI Ref: L_ROY_07368

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 4773
lawrenceroyals robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio thelawrencephotographcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland statue tenniscourt boyle countyroscommon ireland pedestal williamiii pleasuregrounds kinghouse kingwilliam boylepleasuregrounds

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  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 05/Mar/2018 08:34:23

    Streetview and 25" map link

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 05/Mar/2018 08:39:12

    From Boyle Town & More page entry on boyle Bridge: A statue of William III on the bridge, erected originally in 1754 by Lord Kingston was removed to the Pleasure Grounds from where it disappeared in the 1930’s.

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    Oretani Wildlife (Mike Grimes)

    • 05/Mar/2018 08:39:25

    King House and Boyle Pleasure Grounds. It would appear that the statue has been removed from the pedestal. goo.gl/images/j76ysF www.kinghouse.ie/home#intro

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 05/Mar/2018 08:42:03

    A similar shot in the archive titled King William's Statue, Boyle.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 05/Mar/2018 08:44:11

    King House from 1720 in the background is no help for dating purposes.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 05/Mar/2018 08:46:47

    Another ref: D’Alton Annals of Boyle refer to ‘a statue of King William representing his majesty with a crown of Laurel on his head and the Order of the Garter on his knee’. When the new bridge was built in 1834, Viscount Lorton had the monument moved to the Pleasure Grounds. Later ,during the ‘Troubles’ in the early 1920’s, the statue was beheaded. Subsequently the rest of the statue was removed and now only the pedestal remains.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 05/Mar/2018 08:58:27

    Not a million miles away: Boat Harbour at Rockingham

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    derangedlemur

    • 05/Mar/2018 09:27:00

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] I found a lot of images of the King William II statue with him on a horse, including one where he's been knocked over. Are you sure this is King William as well?

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 05/Mar/2018 09:54:23

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] This is King William III. He's marked on the 25" above, and named in the identical catalogue shot linked above.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 05/Mar/2018 10:03:17

    King Billy's statue did not receive a great deal of lurve. This is from 1905, which might imply the photo is before 1905 ?

    An extraordinary affair happened at Boyle, Roscommon, recently. A statue of King William IIL, erected by the first Earl of Kingston, in the private grounds now belonging to the Boyle Lawn Tennis Club, was hacked at by some men with chisels, who, after removing the head, covered the rest of the statue with tar, and finally stuck a green bough in the neck. The Lawn Tennis Club have made a claim for £200 for malicious injury, while the United Irish League has also frowned upon the action and offered a. reward for the discovery of the perpetrators.
    From trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/100647679?searchTerm=b... And also this from 1929 - trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/201245206?searchTerm=b...

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 05/Mar/2018 10:16:04

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] I see what's happened. A search for "Boyle King William Statue" returns the college green statue, what with Boyle being a person more than a place.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 05/Mar/2018 10:26:17

    Ha! Streetview has this photo (or maybe the other Lawrence one) on the Park notice sign - excitement! - goo.gl/maps/jLLi9JU2wPH2 Ed. - Boo hoo! They used the other photo without the lady - see the March 2011 view ...

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    Niall McAuley

    • 05/Mar/2018 10:41:38

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] Well spotted!

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    Niall McAuley

    • 05/Mar/2018 10:44:37

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] The second Trove article you link says: "Twenty years ago the head was cut off the statue, and It has remained headless slnce", so yes, that means these pics are before that 1905 attack.

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    sam2cents

    • 05/Mar/2018 13:25:06

    It almost looks like there's a conversation going on between the woman and the statue. "How's it going down there?"

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 05/Mar/2018 21:28:32

    Mr French / Lawrence took a couple of photos of the "Military Barracks" from near the tennis club shed; the top right dormer window is in the same position as here, implying the same day... catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000332568 (clearer) catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000320122 He must have been experimenting with different cameras or glass plate sizes, as one is ROY and the other CAB, as with the two photos of this statue. I don't understand the technicalities, but I think it has been mentioned before somewhere?

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 05/Mar/2018 21:49:30

    Perhaps the fondly gazing lady was reminded of Oscar Wilde's The Happy Prince (1888) ...

    High above the city, on a tall column, stood the statue of the Happy Prince. He was gilded all over with thin leaves of fine gold, for eyes he had two bright sapphires, and a large red ruby glowed on his sword-hilt. He was very much admired indeed. 'He is as beautiful as a weathercock,' remarked one of the Town Councillors who wished to gain a reputation for having artistic taste; 'only not quite so useful,' he added, fearing lest people should think him unpractical, which he really was not. ... ...
    ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/w/wilde/oscar/happy/chapter1.html

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    DannyM8

    • 06/Mar/2018 08:48:05

    it is a big pedestal for a relatively small statue.

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    Dr. Ilia

    • 14/Mar/2018 10:00:06

    brilliant!