Image from page 494 of "Wanderings in South America, the north-west of the United States and the Antilles in the years 1812, 1816, 1820 & 1824 : with original instructions for the perfect preservation of birds, etc. for cabinets of natural history" (1885)

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Identifier: wanderingsinsout00wate
Title: Wanderings in South America, the north-west of the United States and the Antilles in the years 1812, 1816, 1820 & 1824 : with original instructions for the perfect preservation of birds, etc. for cabinets of natural history
Year: 1885 (1880s)
Authors: Waterton, Charles, 1782-1865 Wood, J. G. (John George), 1827-1889
Subjects: Zoology -- Guyana Zoology -- South America Guyana -- Description and travel South America -- Description and travel Brazil -- Description and travel
Publisher: London : Macmillan
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN


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Text Appearing Before Image:
ge, about as large as thebullfinch. Most of the species are South American, butsome are from Africa. Some totally distinct birds belongingto the genus Tigrisoina are also called Tiger-birds. Tiger-cat.—One of the small Leopards known as Margays[Leopardus tigrinus). Several species of leopard are called bythis name. Waterton tamed one of them, brought it home,and actually trained it to ran with the fox-hounds. It wasvery useful as a rat-catcher. TiNAMOu.—These birds all belong to the genus Tinamotis,and are all natives of South America. They are on anaverage about the size of a grouse. They have very shorttails, which gives them rather a lumpish appearance. Theyseem to be rather stupid birds, and can be caught by anoose fixed to the end of a long stick. The species which ismentioned by Waterton under the name of Maam is probablyTinamotis elegans. Tirana.—See Sun bird. Tortoise.—This is the Box-Tortoise (Cishida Carolina),so called because it can not only draw its limbs and head

Text Appearing After Image:
within the shell, but can fold the shell together, so that itis quite invulnerable.—See Sydney Smiths simile on page 19.The negroes call it by the name of Cooter. 476 EXPLANATORY INDEX. It is always to be found in dry situations, preferring thepine forests, because they also love a dry soil. It is of smallsize, and as it is very prettily coloured, it is sometimes manu-factured into a snuff-box, being mounted in silver, and havingthe movable plates fitted with hinges, and spring-clasps.The colour is most variable, but black and yellow are themost conspicuous hues. Toucan.—Tropical America produces an inexhaustiblevariety of living creatures, and there is perhaps none moreremarkable than that extraordinary group of birds known asToucans, from the native name Toco.


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bookidwanderingsinsout00wate bookyear1885 bookdecade1880 bookcentury1800 bookauthorwatertoncharles17821865 bookauthorwoodjgjohngeorge18271889 booksubjectzoologyguyana booksubjectzoologysouthamerica booksubjectguyanadescriptionandtravel booksubjectsouthamericadescriptionandtravel booksubjectbrazildescriptionandtravel bookpublisherlondonmacmillan bookcontributoruniversityofcalifornialibraries booksponsormsn bookleafnumber494 bookcollectioncdl bookcollectionamericana bhlcollection

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