The Netterville Institute, Meath.

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Where: Meath, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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Though listed in the catalogue as "County Louth", sharon.corbet was quick off the mark to establish (with derangedlemur confirming) that no only does the building still exist, but - strictly - it's in Meath. (And available for sale if you have a few bob to spare)

Photographer: Robert French

Collection: The Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: between ca. 1865-1914

NLI Ref: L_ROY_06190

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 19011
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio thelawrencephotographcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland georgecashlin georgecoppingerashlin nettervillealmshouses dowth duleek comeath ireland leinster locationidentified

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  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 08/Jul/2015 07:13:37

    Not only still there but recently restored. Streetview (which caught it mid-restoration.)

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    sharon.corbet

    • 08/Jul/2015 07:15:34

    It's also for sale, if anyone has 2.25 million EUR to spare.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 08/Jul/2015 07:22:16

    Netterville was built in 1877, as an almshouse, according to the NIAH.

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    Carol Maddock

    • 08/Jul/2015 07:41:33

    Tenders were invited for the building of the Almshouses at the start of January 1877. The drawings and specs were available for prospective builders to inspect at the architect’s office - George Coppinger Ashlin, 90 Stephen’s Green, Dublin. Sealed tenders had to be forwarded to Mr Ashlin by 22 January. Builders were warned that the lowest tender might not necessarily be accepted, and they had to prove they were financially solvent. (Freeman’s Journal, 6 January 1877) We've met Mr Ashlin's work before... [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/7406536002]

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 08/Jul/2015 08:05:58

    I love this! When we have a definitive location that proves to be wrong! If you were falling all the way from Drogheda to Dowth you would have a lot of time to brace yourself for the big bang!

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    Carol Maddock

    • 08/Jul/2015 08:09:16

    Found a great yoke in the Sunday Independent, 17 February 1924. That paper used run a “Where Is It?” competition - a Flickroonies forerunner. Of 10 mystery pictures from all over Ireland, no. 6 was the Netterville Institute. Readers had variously identified it as “Cabra Deaf and Dumb School (desperate name, but of its time!); Louth Hospital; Mallow Mercy Convent; O’Brien Institute, Clontarf; Ballylynch Stud Farm, Kilkenny...

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    Carol Maddock

    • 08/Jul/2015 08:16:05

    The foundations were being laid by April 1877. The building was to cost £4,000. The contractors were the “well-known and eminent firm of Hammond, Brothers, Sheephouse”. While Mr Ashlin was the architect, the works themselves were to be carried out under the supervision of another architect, Mr. P.J. Dodd of Drogheda. (Nation 28 April 1877)

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    sharon.corbet

    • 08/Jul/2015 08:38:48

    The house next door Dowth Hall belonged to the Nettervilles and was built for the 6th Viscount Netterville when Dowth Castle (the building on the right in the photo) began to fall apart. The description of the house includes the following snippet.. "The sixth Viscount Netterville, somewhat eccentric, fell into dispute with the local priest and was banned from the chapel on his own land; in retaliation, he built a ‘tea house’ on top of the Neolithic tomb from which he claimed to follow religious services through a telescope."

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    sharon.corbet

    • 08/Jul/2015 09:00:24

    From The picture of Dublin: or, Stranger's guide to the Irish metropolis,1835: "The Netterville Charities:These established and endowed under the will of Viscount Netterville and consist of a an Orphan House and a Sunday and situated at Douth Castle near Drogheda a Daily School situate at Ballymore county a Sunday and Daily School situated at Islandbridge in the county of Dublin and an Hospital and Dispensary for intern and extern patients inhabitants of Saint Paul's parish situated in Blackhall street Dublin." The plaque over the door of the Institute reads: 'These almshouses were built A.D. 1877 out of the surplus fund accumulated by provident management of the Netterville charities by the trustees. Arthur James Earl of Fingall. Richard Gradwell, Esq. of Dowth Hall, Co. Meath. Malachy Strong Hussey, Esq. of Westown, Co. Dublin.'

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    O Mac

    • 08/Jul/2015 13:27:35

    All the best with the launch of the parish records today. Owen

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 08/Jul/2015 19:30:52

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Thanks Owen - For those that aren't aware, everyone at Library Towers is very excited this week with the launch of the Catholic Parish Registers website. Those familiar with the damage to the Public Records Office in 1922 will be aware of the impact on the centralised government records - so we are absolutely delighted to be making these types of records available. We won't feel aggrieved if things go quiet on this stream for a few days - while everyone goes off hunting for their Granny's baptism records :)

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    Carol Maddock

    • 08/Jul/2015 19:40:22

    Malachy Strong Hussey, he of https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]’s plaque above, wrote to the Freeman’s Journal, 27 February 1879, announcing that he was resigning from the Netterville trustees because of his ill health, but assuring readers that Lord Fingall would be carrying on.

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    Carol Maddock

    • 08/Jul/2015 20:07:12

    A meeting of the Drogheda Union in April 1879 to discuss workhouse cases reads like portions of Trollope’s The Warden:

    … that the clerk be directed to write to the trustees of the Netterville Charity Trust, requesting them to take certain widows, at present in receipt of out-door relief, into the Dowth Almshouse. ... [set up] for the suitable accommodation of widows, whose number should not be less than ten or more than twelve, and also that a school should be provided for the children of the parish of Dowth. … There were only six widows at present in the Dowth almshouse, some of whom were not from Dowth at all. The scheme provided that there should be rations for twelve widows, at £20 per annum each; clothing, £26; rations for six orphans, £12; clothing, £2 a year; apprentice fees, &c. Now the guardians had to give outdoor relief to three or four poor widows living in Dowth, who should, according to Lord Netterville’s will and intention, be in the Dowth almshouse. … Mr. Gradwell, J.P., [also named on the Netterville plaque] remarked that, except from himself, they could get no reply for six months, as one of the trustees had resigned, and they must go before the Lord Chancellor to get a successor appointed. They were not bound by Lord Netterville’s will to take in more than six widows, and it was at their option when and from where to take them.
    (Freeman’s Journal, 4 April 1879) Wonder what happened the three or four widows surviving on outdoor relief from the Drogheda Union over the next six months until the Trustee issue was resolved, and if it was like these 1880s Achill women...

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 09/Jul/2015 01:36:57

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Not for I, we're English. We were the naughties in Ireland, back in the day... Glad to be here now, and that we can all get along. Seriously, posting records online is great for those doing family history research. And it's free, that's super cool. Hats off!

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    poncho640

    • 23/Jul/2015 00:48:28

    Nice!