King George VI visits Dundalk

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Where: Unknown

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When: 24 September 1960

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O'Dea has created such a wonderful record of the transition from steam to diesel and the closure of stations. This magnificent shot of a visit by a beautiful locomotive must have been a mouth watering occasion for him and all railway enthusiasts?

And, indeed, whether foaming at the mouth our otherwise, our own railway enthusiasts have identified this "2-6-0" loco as No 99 (class W) "King George VI”, of the Northern Counties (NCC) railway company. According to this Wikipedia article, there were 15 of these locos in use in Ireland. Most with colorful names :)


Photographer: James P. O'Dea

Collection:James P. O'Dea

Date: 24 September 1960

NLI Ref.: ODEA 22/50

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 5665
jamespo’dea o’deaphotographiccollection nationallibraryofireland locomotive dundalk colouth kinggeorgevi ulstertransportauthority ncc260locomotive countylouth

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  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 07/May/2019 07:50:17

    Per the article at wikipedia on the GWR 6000 Class: Following the death of King George V in 1936, No. 6029 ‘King Stephen’ was renamed ‘King Edward VIII’ after his successor; and following the abdication of the latter in the same year, No. 6028 was renamed ‘King George VI’ after the new King. Also: The entire class was withdrawn in 1962 and replaced by the Western Region's short-lived diesel hydraulic Western Class locomotives.

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    Dr. Ilia

    • 07/May/2019 08:00:09

    Wow ! Awesome!!

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    robinparkes

    • 07/May/2019 08:27:23

    Ulster Transport Authority roundel on the tender. This class of locomotive was built in the mid 1930s by the LMS for the Northern Counties Committee for the Belfast to Derry lines. It has the table catcher on the cab side which enable the trains to enter a single track section at 60mph thus eliminating the need to slow at a signal cabin to exchange tokens. The locomotives were passed to the Ulster Transport Authority in 1948 when most of the railways in the UK were nationalised. Both the W class and WT tank engine derivatives were used on the Enterprise express as far as Dundalk where a CIE diesel replaced it for the onward journey to Dublin.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 07/May/2019 08:45:55

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/ - For a while I have been getting error reports from your website and the images are not loading. Is it you or my Google Chromebook? Anyone else? "catalogue.nli.ie says Error: No response from server /cgi-bin/iipsrv.fcgi"

  • profile

    robinparkes

    • 07/May/2019 09:10:46

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia I have an iMac and don't normally have a problem. It's usually Flickr itself that has the problem. I use Safari as my search engine. Have you tried another search engine?

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    derangedlemur

    • 07/May/2019 10:23:40

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] I don't think it's that one - those were 4-6-0s, whereas this is a 2-6-0. It also seems to be number 99. I'm guessing it's a Northern Counties Committee W class (See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steam_locomotives_of_Ireland) Edit: I see [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] is way ahead of me.

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 07/May/2019 10:25:03

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Same here. nli server error?

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 07/May/2019 10:27:06

    from www.steamtrainsireland.com/rpsi-collection/4/no4 One of the NCC's first priorities was to modernise the ageing locomotive fleet. In 1933 the 'W' class Moguls were introduced. Designed by the NCC's CME, Stewart, the 2-6-0s incorporated standard LMS parts and visually were clearly part of the 'Midland' family - having much in common with a 'Crab'. As successful as the 'W' class was, the NCC decided in 1944 that its trains in future would be operated by tank engines to remove the need to turn locomotives. A 2-6-4T variant of the Moguls was duly designed, but pressure of work at Derby meant that the first, No.5, did not arrive in Northern Ireland until the summer of 1946. This, the most powerful tank engine yet seen in Ireland, entered service on 8th August. Between then and 1950 17 further 'WT' engines were built, including No.4, turned out in 1947.

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    derangedlemur

    • 07/May/2019 10:30:04

    Here's number 94: www.lmsncc.org/index_htm_files/26945.jpg

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    Carol Maddock

    • 07/May/2019 10:48:14

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia We're having some gremlins causing trouble with our servers here at Library Towers today. Apologies to all. Hopefully back in action soon...

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 07/May/2019 11:12:28

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Thanks; so glad it's not my fault! I know the Boffiny Genius will fix it in no time.

  • profile

    john durrant

    • 07/May/2019 19:03:00

    As a lad I usd to run to the local bridge whenever a steam train came through and just looking at this pic i can smell it again. Thanks for posting.

  • profile

    PerfectStills

    • 08/May/2019 06:54:33

    Fantastic Photograph - I grew up in Dundalk with the Railway lines behind my house and can remember seeing these steam engines working. There was one Engine (I suspect it was No. 4) placed on a raised platform at the station for many years and was often climbing all over it, but never managed to get it running!

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 08/May/2019 17:12:34

    Thanks all. Especially https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] and https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]. I've added a short summary to the description!

  • profile

    robinparkes

    • 08/May/2019 17:18:20

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ It’s been a long time since I’ve been able to comment on any of the photos so it was nice for that one to appear. I never got to see those locomotives in action. It was always No. 4, the 2-6-4 tank locomotive on the Larne railway and, no, it was never parked on the platform at Dundalk.

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    LucanTram

    • 08/May/2019 23:37:23

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/perfectstills GNRI 131 was the locomotive on the plinth at Dundalk. The RPSI now have it running and it may pass through Dundalk later today.