Pioneering Teeth? Teeth for Pioneers?

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Where: Leinster, Ireland

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When: 01 January 1910

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
Back in the very heart of Dublin today. We've been here before, but I just could not resist the siren call of all those beautiful signs...

Photographer: Unknown

Collection: Dublin Trams Collection

Date: Likely c.1900-1910(ish)

NLI Ref: NPA TRAM120

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 6810
nelsonspillar nelsonpillar sackvillestreet oconnellstreet dublin leinster ireland nationallibraryofireland dublintramscollection northearlstreet trams 1910s twentiethcentury tyler dartrydyeworks

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  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 12/Jun/2019 08:20:02

    Looking East along North Earl Street. 25" map Streetview.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 12/Jun/2019 08:22:51

    Dates: After tram electrification, 1898 Before this was all destroyed in 1916. Reverse view of destruction

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    Niall McAuley

    • 12/Jun/2019 08:33:52

    I note a swan necked light (these arrived with the tram electrification) which does not have the earliest globe with wire cage, suggesting nearer 1916 then 1900.

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    Domhnallcos

    • 12/Jun/2019 08:40:56

    Ad from An Claidheamh Soluis, December 1910 for Pioneer Teeth. An Claidheamh Soluis: Iúil-Nollaig 1910 by Conradh na Gaeilge - issuu

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    John Spooner

    • 12/Jun/2019 08:55:53

    Adverts for the Pioneer Teeth Institute appeared in the Dublin Evening Mail in July and August 1907. They were giving away absolutely free a few sets of teeth to the deserving poor.

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    sam2cents

    • 12/Jun/2019 09:12:55

    And 10.10 am according to the clock, which really sets the scene. I love this photo. You can see it was definitely a moment from real life.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 12/Jun/2019 09:16:17

    Look what is centre frame now - www.beyondthelamppost.com/james-joyce-statue-dublin/

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 12/Jun/2019 09:21:58

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner What was the address for the Pioneering Teeth back in 1907, John? I'm just back from a rummage (technical term) in Thoms' Dublin Directories. The floors above Tyler's and Dartry Dye Works were known as Sackville Chambers. The Pioneer Teeth are there in 1910 as Domhnall found https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/48048264552/ but the Irish United Assurance Society don't appear in the Chambers until 1911.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 12/Jun/2019 09:24:22

    P.S. Tn 1910, according to Thoms, the Pioneering Teeth had offices alongside all manner of companies, but I loved these ones... T. Vincent Riordan, consul for Venezuela, and J. J. Sherlock, private investigator

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 12/Jun/2019 09:26:21

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/sam2cents Are you mixing up the big hand and the little hand? Or is https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ seeing everything upside down? :)

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    Niall McAuley

    • 12/Jun/2019 09:33:59

    On that swan-necked light, L_ROY_08560 is after electrification, but with the original globe light. Some street signs also change. You can also see the size of the Tylers building, completely destroyed in 1916 as shown in the reverse view above. Between the two, the text on the clock on the South side changes from Downes to Winstanley

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 12/Jun/2019 10:09:44

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Sherlock, PI? hmmmm

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 12/Jun/2019 10:26:16

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland The address given is 1 Upper Sackville St.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 12/Jun/2019 10:33:41

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Wow, so they had been there since 1907. That is the correct address for Sackville Chambers alright.

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    John Spooner

    • 12/Jun/2019 10:40:41

    PS (a bit of a tangent) the offices of the Pioneer Teeth Institute at Woolwich crops up a lot in newspapers in October 1926. Two bodies were found in a gas-filled room in each others' arms - the manager Herbert Tyrell and Helen Keen, the 19-year-old who acted as his clerk. At the inquest his widow was said to be "sobbing bitterly". As I've only got access to the search results and a couple of lines of text for each newspaper article I'm tempted to visit my local library to get the full story.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 12/Jun/2019 11:25:52

    Trying unsuccessfully to find out what that inscription on this side of the Pillar says. I think it is "XV FEBRUARIUS MDCCCVIII" - 15 February 1808, when they laid the foundation stone ... This morsel from wikipedia might help with the dating of a lot of old photos of O'Connell Street - "... In 1894 there were some significant alterations to the Pillar's fabric. The original entry on the west [this] side, whereby visitors entered the pedestal by a flight of steps taking them down below street level, was replaced by a new ground level entrance on the south side, with a grand porch. The whole monument was surrounded by heavy iron railings. .." From - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nelson%27s_Pillar#1809%E2%80%931916 Also - archiseek.com/2015/1894-design-for-entrance-and-railings-... The heavy iron railings had gone by 1922 - [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/44348770421/]

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 12/Jun/2019 11:28:08

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Have finger poised over the Sudden Death Klaxon. :(

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 12/Jun/2019 11:35:13

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Per wikipedia, down in the notes: The inscriptions on each side were as follows: "ST. VINCENT XIV FEBRUARY MDCCXCVII" (west); "THE NILE I AUGUST MDCCXCVIII" (north); "COPENHAGEN II APRIL MDCCCI" (east); "TRAFALGAR XXI OCTOBER MDCCCV" (south). These refer to the following battles and their dates: Battle of Cape St Vincent (14 February 1797); Battle of the Nile (1–3 August 1798); Battle of Copenhagen (2 April 1801); and Battle of Trafalgar (21 October 1805). We are seeing a bit of the Western inscription for the battle of St. Vincent, 1797

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 12/Jun/2019 11:42:19

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Whoopee! Thanks!

  • profile

    sam2cents

    • 12/Jun/2019 21:05:57

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland It depends on whether I'm looking east or west, but I think I probably mixed it up, which explains the shadows.

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    John Spooner

    • 13/Jun/2019 09:18:44

    Dublin Evening Mail 20th August 1907 FreeTeeth

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    John Spooner

    • 13/Jun/2019 09:40:45

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland The findings of the inquest into the deaths of Herbert Turrell, 33, and Helen Keen, 19, did not do much for the reputation of the Pioneer Teeth Institute. Turrell, who had served as a sapper, had left the army in 1919 but then "gone to pieces" and turned to drink, and often spent long periods with his head in his hands. He was a dentist and managed the Woolwich branch, but he himself had bad teeth. He didn't want to show the state of his mouth to another dentist, so got the young girl Helen Keen, who worked as a clerk, to remove them all following his instructions (and according to Mrs Turrell made a bad job of it, surprise, surprise "All the bones were showing in his mouth"). It emerged from the evidence that they were having an affair, and were found "clasped together" under an overcoat with a gas pipe leading to it. A post mortem found that Keen was, in the words of the newspapers "in a certain condition". The verdict was "suicide while of unsound mind".

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    John Spooner

    • 14/Jun/2019 08:57:39

    BTW J. J. Sherlock kept his investigations private - I couldn't find any references to his activities, unless he was the J. J. Sherlock who sailed his yacht at the Kingstown regatta.

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    Rhys Chris Pease

    • 17/Jun/2019 16:41:26

    The Insurance claim for damage to the Dartry Dye Works Ltd premises at 2 Upper Sackville Street during the East Rising can be found online at centenaries.nationalarchives.ie/reels/plic/PLIC_1_3654.pdf Robert Benson was the Managing Director who submitted the claim. Robert lived in Orwell road , was a Quaker , 46 and married for 15 years and Born in England as was his wife Bessie.

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    Rhys Chris Pease

    • 17/Jun/2019 16:41:52

    Easter ( Not East )