British troops leaving Cork - British carriages arriving in Dublin

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Where: Leinster, Dublin City, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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"Cambridge Ferry" With new carriages ex BR Derby, North Wall, Co. Dublin. with a ship that looks remarkable similar to the ferry that took the troops and equipment from Cork 50 years earlier. Coincidentally just this week Transport for Ireland announced that it had ordered new rolling stock for Irish Rail which will probably arrive at the same point in due course!

Photographer: James P. O'Dea

Collection:James P. O'Dea

Date: September 19 1972

NLI Ref.: ODEA 97/2

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie


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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 6112
jamespo’dea o’deaphotographiccollection nationallibraryofireland cambridge ferry carriages rollingstock northwall dublin delivery cie corasiompairéireann derby

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    Justin Merrigan

    • 01/Nov/2019 09:02:02

    The British Rail train ferry Cambridge Ferry. She operated between Holyhead and Dun Laoghaire in February 1991, right at the end of her career. She was also a regular on the Fishguard - Rosslare run during the late 1980s.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 01/Nov/2019 09:37:02

    Troops? [ed. Oh I see what you meant!] "... In 1972, Cambridge Ferry and Essex Ferry made ten voyages between Harwich and Dublin, Ireland to deliver new rolling stock to CIÉ. ..." From - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MV_Cambridge_Ferry

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 01/Nov/2019 09:42:49

    Flickr is sometimes surprisingly amazing! In 1984 via https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/30306586612/

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    O Mac

    • 01/Nov/2019 10:00:36

    There's a connection between this ferry and Train Ferry 2 seen at Cork. Both used the same "link span" at Harwich. This links span was moved from Port Richborough after WW1 and is now a national monument in Harwich. flic.kr/p/bKFARH I wonder how those new coach's with their 5' 3” Irish guage aligned with the 4' 81/2” British guage on the ferry?

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    suckindeesel

    • 01/Nov/2019 10:19:57

    Well, they didn't, must have been up on wooden blocks or something. Delivery of seventy-two Mk2 coaches from Derby. Lasted in service till 2008. I wonder what it was doing on the Fishguard run as train ferrries were never a feature between Britain and Ireland

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    CASSIDY PHOTOGRAPHY

    • 01/Nov/2019 10:20:54

    Too bad the Republic of Ireland, of the day, didn't own and operate any submarines. www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/ Also, please re-read your photo comment "with a ship that looks remarkable similar to the ferry that took the troops and equipment from Cork 50 years earlier. " Do you see anything wrong with it the way it was written?

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 01/Nov/2019 10:29:31

    I am no expert with trainspotty stuff but it looks like the bogies - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000308355 - were swapped - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000308351 And the pointy end of the ferry - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000308354

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    DannyM8

    • 01/Nov/2019 10:43:10

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ I presume you are not aware that this stream is run exclusively by Volunteers working in their own time on behalf of the National Library of Ireland. I suggest you re-read and then edit your comment as appropriate.

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    CASSIDY PHOTOGRAPHY

    • 01/Nov/2019 11:03:41

    www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/ Also, please re-read your photo comment "with a ship that looks remarkable similar to the ferry that took the troops and equipment from Cork 50 years earlier. " Do you see anything wrong with it the way it was written? www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ OK, comment re-read and I guess I will be more direct . . . the word "remarkable" should be changed to remarkably. Not sure what being a volunteer has to do with spelling and grammar, especially coming out of any library, anywhere in the world. I was trying to be sly and nice about it. Screw being nice.

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    metrovick

    • 01/Nov/2019 11:10:38

    BREL MK2d's. 72 of these vehicles were delivered. They were withdrawn from service c2007

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    DannyM8

    • 01/Nov/2019 11:27:53

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Sly, I believe. Nice, I doubt. By the way, what would you suggest the ROI should have done if it did own a submarine in 1972?

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    suckindeesel

    • 01/Nov/2019 12:04:58

    I think Beechcomber is correct re bogies, other photos that day show coach being lifted off ferry, sans bogies, and then lowered onto Irish gauge bogies on the quayside

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    abandoned railways

    • 01/Nov/2019 12:06:19

    I believe these wagons became the first Air Condition coaches in Irish Rail. On the Cork - Dublin line they were known as AC1 and AC2. I worked on them.

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    John A. Coffey

    • 01/Nov/2019 12:14:05

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons , buíochas.

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    maczeug2

    • 01/Nov/2019 12:19:45

     Nicely done ;-)

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    Foxglove

    • 01/Nov/2019 12:27:37

    John Holland, designed the first modern submarine, was inancially supported in the USA by the IRB/Fenians. design was adopted by several navies .... but thankfully the INS priorities are to protect fish and save migrants in the Med with the ships named after the children of Lir.

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    DannyM8

    • 01/Nov/2019 13:59:28

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Well said.

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    suckindeesel

    • 02/Nov/2019 00:36:51

    Location is "North Quay Extension", to give it its official title. North Wall lighthouse in background. Yes, they were the first of the modern CIE coaches, with Air Con and 3-phase power supply from the gen van. Shipped on "slave" bogies, then lifted off using the famous 100-ton crane onto their proper bogies. Each one towed by loco out the dock gate, across the road, and through what is now the Point car park. Then marshalled in the goods yard before moving to Inchicore.

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    Dr. Ilia

    • 12/Nov/2019 09:00:06

    Wonderful capture 👏👏👏