Newbridge railway station

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Where: Leinster, Co Kildare, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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Our Mr O'Dea may have recorded the decline and fall of the railway system in Ireland, but Mr. French recorded some of its earlier days. This fine image of Newbridge station in County Kildare shows French at his best. Men working on the line while a supervisor looks down from the platform. A fairly tranquil scene otherwise as people wait, but what is the man on the bottom right near the luggage doing?

For the umpteenth time, wall posters helped us establish a fairly sound date for this photo. Thanks to sharon.corbet, BultacoFan, and suckindeesel for narrowing a 20 year time span down to May 1910, specifically after 20th May.

And thank you too, BeachcomberAustralia, for reminding us about how the usage and root of words and language can vary greatly between this Northern and your Southern Hemisphere.

Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: 1910 but, after 20th May.

NLI Ref: L_ROY_10599

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 7290
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio thelawrencephotographcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland newbridgerailwaystation platforms lines corklimericktodublinline luggage easonshop posters may 1910 twentiethcentury lloydsnews edwardvii lloydsweeklynews trains railways railroads newbridge kildare leinster

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  • profile

    Carol Maddock

    • 05/Nov/2019 08:49:56

    And excellent posterage going on!

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    sharon.corbet

    • 05/Nov/2019 08:58:38

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I would assume that "The Dead King's Last Journey" means that it is either around or not too long after Edward VII's funeral on 20 May 1910.

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    BultacoFan

    • 05/Nov/2019 09:00:01

    The newspaper headline referring to the dead king's last journey must be Edward VII, who died on 6th May 1910 in Buckingham Palace. He was buried on 20th May 1910 in Windsor Castle. Colourised video footage of the funeral procession was shown recently in the 'Britain in Colour' series on the Smithsonian Channel.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 05/Nov/2019 09:03:52

    You can buy a copy of the Lloyd's Weekly News from May 22 on ebay, which looks to be the edition from the poster.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 05/Nov/2019 09:05:12

    The current streetview is marred by a new bridge (in Newbridge!), but the 2011 streetview is not too awful - peep into the water tank - goo.gl/maps/fMk88duvm64Ri1Ph7

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 05/Nov/2019 09:08:42

    Flickr is sometimes and the NLI is always amazing! In c. 1910 via https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/6666156803/

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    BultacoFan

    • 05/Nov/2019 09:08:46

    As the OS map of the time shows only one footbridge across the tracks in Newbridge, the picture must have been taken from the bridge on Station Road (R416). Therefore, the camera is looking North-East towards the next station, which appears to be Sallins, and ultimately Kingsbridge (now Heuston) on the Great Southern & Western Railway.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 05/Nov/2019 09:14:16

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Agreed :-)

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 05/Nov/2019 09:17:51

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet https://www.flickr.com/photos/bultacofan I presume you are both 100% correct, I have changed the date range to 1910 but after 20th May. I wonder how often did they change these posters? Daily? Weekly?

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 05/Nov/2019 09:24:30

    Lloyd's was a weekly paper, so that one would probably have stayed up at least a week.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 05/Nov/2019 09:29:01

    Some railway workers from Newbridge in the 1911 Census I wonder which of them are present in the photograph? Tick the "Show all Information" box

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 05/Nov/2019 09:40:51

    80 years later - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000354916

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 05/Nov/2019 09:59:00

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia How crisp and clear the original is in comparison to the later photograph!

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 05/Nov/2019 10:00:53

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Did the Nation stop for the big race? I see the winning Trainer was an O'Brien, but not one of the O'Briens we were rooting shouting barracking for!

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    Foxglove

    • 05/Nov/2019 10:05:14

    several of the workers are aware that the photos are being taken ( they are looking to lens) however one shy man is trying to hide in the hardcore! If you ate not sure what builders hardcore is I can advise not to Google it while at work or .... even at home

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 05/Nov/2019 10:13:04

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/foxglove I think "Ballast" is the technical term!

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 05/Nov/2019 10:35:20

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] Yes, Australia came to a grinding halt today for the Melbourne Cup. Careful, "rooting" means something different here! Talking of horses - This from a visiting Australian in 1910 - Mr Sullivan, the author, might be that fellow bottom right near the luggage ... "... Pulling up at Newbridge, a small township comes into view. This is the station for the "Curragh" of Kildare, a vast common belonging to the Crown. Large estates, surrounded by the greenest of hedges, are seen; also racehorses and buildings, which looked like training stables. Sheep were quietly browsing on a rich sward of the greenest of grass. ..." From - trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/170920584

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 05/Nov/2019 10:47:22

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia very good! How does "shouting for" read?

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 05/Nov/2019 11:08:00

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Much better. "Barracking for" is the colloquial idiom. No idea how that happened. Ireland and Australia are two countries divided by a common language.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 05/Nov/2019 11:58:10

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia "Barracking for" it is then!

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    Foxglove

    • 05/Nov/2019 13:41:09

    between advice on "rooting" and "hardcore" we should not make any references to the trains in the photo have pulled out on time and only left little men on the tracks. I would never have had a chance to get on TV with Gay Byrne ... or maybe..

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    BlueisCoool

    • 05/Nov/2019 16:28:35

    A wonderful image.

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    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 05/Nov/2019 16:46:45

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/bultacofan] Agreed Untitled-1_1.psd

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    suckindeesel

    • 05/Nov/2019 17:51:34

    The Eason's kiosk would mean that the current edition was displayed. It might take at least a day for a London Sunday paper to reach Ireland, so date of photo between 21st and 28th May 1910. Also unlikely that the permanent way men worked on the Sabbath. As for the man with the luggage, he's obviously looking at his phone, just another documented case of time slip for YouTube.

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    silverio10

    • 05/Nov/2019 23:16:10

    Buenas fotos antiguas .

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    Michael J. Linden

    • 06/Nov/2019 01:46:42

    A lovely opportunity to time travel...

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    John A. Coffey

    • 06/Nov/2019 11:28:00

    Newbridge 1950s, the " Ballast pit" was near the station, the local Irish Rope Factory used it to "dispose" of some of its rope off cuts. The Travellers who camped near by could splice these lengths together as one long rope, old canvas, timber etc, all put to use.

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    jamica1

    • 11/Nov/2019 22:42:22

    I was wondering if the man near the luggage might have been filling a pipe.

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    Dr. Ilia

    • 14/Nov/2019 09:00:07

    good shot

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    West4120

    • 10/Dec/2019 18:56:18

    french gream bueriut