Sir Horace Plunkett - in all his glory

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If yesterdays image was of a boy having to do a mans job and a strong mans job at that today's image is one of privilege however distinguished the family. I never heard of Horace Plunkett and assume that he was a member of the distinguished clan whose most famous member is Saint Oliver Plunkett whose head is in Drogheda Cathedral.

Photographers: Chancellor Photographers Dublin

Collection: Irish Personalities Photographic Collection

Date: 1900

NLI Ref: NPA PLU

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 5320
irishpersonalitiesphotographiccollection nationallibraryofireland personalities ireland sirhoraceplunkett chancellorphotographers dublin limerickbybeachcomber

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  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 29/Nov/2019 09:24:53

    I have read some of his diaries on the NLI catalogue a very interesting and very busy man. He spent time in Ireland, England and Ranching in the USA. At times he was addicted to Opium. His most notable achievement was setting up Co-operatives in Ireland. HIs Diaries are better than most novels!!

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    sharon.corbet

    • 29/Nov/2019 09:28:39

    According to his wiki article he was one of the Dunsany Plunketts - he was the younger brother of the 17th Baron, and the uncle of the 18th, better known as Lord Dunsany the author.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 29/Nov/2019 10:05:46

    And yet another; looks nearer 1900 - via https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/20515592755/

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    Carol Maddock

    • 29/Nov/2019 10:15:44

    And we have more of his diaries here at Library Towers than you could shake a stick at... (Fully digitised if you'd like a look. Caveat: his handwriting is a little Pitman shorthand-looking until you get used to it!)

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    DannyM8

    • 29/Nov/2019 10:21:52

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ There are handy transcripts of each diary which are much easier on my aging eyes!

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 29/Nov/2019 10:23:00

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Do the diaries mention when in 1900 he popped into Chancellor's for a photo op? Trove has many reports about Sir Horace. This from November 1900, when he had lost his parliamentary seat in an election and was guest of honour at a banquet in Dublin - trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/9564763

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    sharon.corbet

    • 29/Nov/2019 10:36:44

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Nope, at least my Ctl-F earlier on the transcript for "Chancellor", "photo", picture" gave nothing.

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    Carol Maddock

    • 29/Nov/2019 10:40:39

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] You oldsters just aren't prepared to struggle for your art. You just want everything handed to you on a plate. https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Mea culpa, I have not checked. (I'm supposed to be working!)

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 29/Nov/2019 11:44:19

    The Sir Horace Plunkett Limerick An extraordinary fellow called Plunkett, Sir Horace was not one to flunk it - He posed for a portrait, Who would have thought it? Or possibly, who would have thunk it?

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    suckindeesel

    • 29/Nov/2019 11:48:17

    A powerhouse in the setting up of the co-op movement in Ireland. He faced the usual virulent opposition from vested interests but, according to wiki: "As visible testimony to his endeavours, he left as his main legacies the Irish cooperative movement, which grew to encompass vast creamery and food ingredient businesses such as Avonmore and Kerry Group, and what is now the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine." See goo.gl/maps/sXMbgCitjgNBWsn38 the premises at 84 Merrion Sq gifted him by a grateful public. His slogan "Better farming, better business, better living" was adopted by Teddy Roosevelt for his conservation and country life policy. Another example of a "prophet in his own country...." ?

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    Domhnallcos

    • 29/Nov/2019 12:36:34

    He was a cousin (distant) of George Noble Plunkett, father of Joseph Mary.

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    John Spooner

    • 29/Nov/2019 13:57:04

    *wakes up at the mention of Chancellors* I wonder if he used the you-know-what, or did he ascend the stairs? boudoir [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet] Perhaps a search for "movable" and/or "boudoir"?

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    DannyM8

    • 29/Nov/2019 17:18:10

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ I remember that!!

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 29/Nov/2019 21:17:11

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner] Aha! "Photographers to H.R.H. The Princess of Wales" might explain the coat of arms on Chancellor's card. It looks like a version of the Order of the Garter - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honi_soit_qui_mal_y_pense Ed.- Or perhaps a Royal Warrant - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Warrant_of_Appointment_(United_Kingdom)

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    suckindeesel

    • 30/Nov/2019 11:13:28

    Looks like the Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom from 1837 to 1952, rather than any Princess of Wales. Thought only the prince, not the princess, could issue a royal warrant. Ted came to the throne in 1901, so some issue here re use of these arms before that date. Perhaps Chancellor was chancing his arm, after all why would some Austrian princess have done business in Dublin?

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 30/Nov/2019 12:04:06

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I think you are right. See the crest above the gate in this shot from Henrietta Street. https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/33481350971

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 30/Nov/2019 12:10:04

    Chancellor's of Dublin took this amazing photo of Queen Victoria and three subsequent monarchs at Osborne House in August 1899, the previous year. That's about as royal as you can get! - www.rct.uk/collection/2105971/queen-victoria-with-the-pri...

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 30/Nov/2019 12:18:45

    And Chancellor's were using the arms (and namedropping!) back in the 1870s - via https://www.flickr.com/photos/w77t/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/w77t/4235950693/

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    suckindeesel

    • 30/Nov/2019 12:40:54

    Yes, looks like he had an "in", all right. But entitltled to use the royal warrant?, surely there must be a list of warrant holders somewhere?

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    John Spooner

    • 30/Nov/2019 15:35:24

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Messrs Chancellor and son doing a bit of royal name-dropping in 1833, when their business was clock-making, 3 decades before they branched out into photography. Warder and Dublin Weekly Mail - Saturday 13 July 1833 [Warder and Dublin Weekly Mail - Saturday 13 July 1833]

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    John Spooner

    • 30/Nov/2019 15:43:13

    @nlireland is always amazing! Johnstown Castle - is that the disused clock-face of a Chancellor Turret or Steeple Clock? "Mock Gothic Castle in parkland" = Johnstown Castle, Wexford!

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    John Spooner

    • 30/Nov/2019 16:01:38

    Megazoom suggest it is clock And it's still there (via www.flickr.com/photos/mauronb) Johnstown Castle

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    John Spooner

    • 30/Nov/2019 16:13:38

    And here's a tweet from last year JCastleClock

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 30/Nov/2019 17:25:21

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Good work, overtime rates apply for hours worked on a Saturday!!

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    suckindeesel

    • 01/Dec/2019 00:07:13

    Looks like he had a royal warrant, see books.google.ie/books?id=b8HVrM5LES0C&pg=PA195&lp..., he was one of nearly 60 that Victoria used. And they say that the modern monarchy invented the manipulation of the media.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 01/Dec/2019 10:00:44

    I thought I might post his diary entries for the period around the Easter Rising for reference. Monday 24th April A black day – a dies irae. The policy of wait & see is a veritable sowing of the wind in Ireland. At 1 P.M. Daisy tried to get on the telephone to the Under Secretary’s Lodge. She was told from the Castle that a “revolution had broken out”, that the police & sentries at the Castle had been fired at, that the gates had been closed & then the telephone stopped. In the afternoon I took Norman who knows the mountain roads to try & find Anderson & his “Methuseliers” who were picnicking in the mountains. I feared they would be ambushed & intended to get at them from the upper side & warn them. Near Sandyford we met some of them & heard they had marched to Dublin. We overtook them & found they had been commandeered. They were armed but had no ammunition & 4 of them were shot dead others being wounded. Then the force was taken into the Beggars Bush Barracks & furnished with ammunition. I came on to the Kildare St. Club & could find no one who knew anything. Spent an anxious night at Kilteragh. NOTES - Fr Leslie, Shane, dies irae – day of wrath; Judgment Day, ‘Methuseliers’ – Veteran Corps, Home Defence Force

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 01/Dec/2019 10:03:43

    Tuesday 25th April Ambrose, caretaker at Plunkett House got through to Kilteragh somehow, though the telephone was only available for military purposes, & told us that the milkman had told him “War was Declared”. This turned out to be a Proclamation declaring Marshall sic Law. All day the city remained a strange mixture of peace & war. The inhabitants – men, women & children ignored the official warning to remain in doors though rifles were popping off occasionally supplemented by machine gun fire. The military occupied the Shelbourne Hotel & thence sniped the rebels who had dug themselves in in Stephens Green. I went in & sent the staff of the Plunkett House Home, got the Fingall women folk Daisy, Hetty & a Miss Dennis to Kilteragh. There I worked the latter part of the day. I took letters to Kingstown but the mail service was suspended. Three barricades I had to climb to get to the St. George’s Yacht Club. Tom Ponsonby came. He started Monday for the Cattle Show but his train (which he was happily able to leave by motor) was held up 25 hours at Maryborough.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 01/Dec/2019 10:04:57

    Wednesday 26th April Still no news from the outside world. I went in to Dublin with Tom Ponsonby & Bullard & to Nathan at the Castle. There he was in the Master of the Horse’s house carrying on the overnment of Ireland, Birrell of course being in London where the papers (which have absolutely no news) say he “made a statement in the House” yesterday! I drove my little motor to the Castle via Nassau & Dame Sts. Dame Street from the South Great. Georges St. was deserted, the military at the Castle & in the City Hall, whence they have evicted the rebels, firing at the houses occupied by “the enemy” on the other side. I went in the Castle which I had some difficulty in getting the guard to enter. I found Nathan surrounded by a queer lot of law officers, police & military. JH Campbell now attorney general was for “thorough” & told me he was going to ask a lot of awkward questions about the management of the business by the authorities at the proper time. General Friend C.O.C. was away in Eng’d when the trouble began on Monday! One Kennard sic (an ass and a Christian Scientist) was his locum tenens. I learned that there was no “rising” elsewhere in Dublin, that the rebellion was organised & led by Sir Roger Casement whom the Government had captured. I had gone to the Castle to get a cypher telegram through to Arthur Balfour telling him I thought it important to let the American people know of the German origin of the Irish trouble. I changed my cable to definite advice to give the capture of Casement as a piece of “exclusive news” to the American press representatives so as to insure their cooperation. I wired Masterton Smith who has my code with House & he replied that my advice would be acted upon. Poor Anderson was shot, but not I think dangerously wounded in the afternoon..

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 01/Dec/2019 10:08:50

    Thursday 27th April Today was to have begun with the meeting of the General C’tee of the IAOS & to have been followed by a United Kingdom Agric’l Cooperative Conference for which I had elaborately prepared. Instead I had to visit Anderson in the Portobello Military Hospital where he was lying hit by three bullets – or buckshot all wounds being slight. Went on to the Castle where I spent 5 or 6 hours at Nathan’s office. He showed me the official file recording the landing of Sir Roger Casement from Germany on the Kerry Coast, his capture and removal to The Tower where he confessed his identity, & deplored the way his poor dupe had been duped by the Germans. All day the Irish Volunteers held their own & illustrated the enormous difficulty of dealing with an enemy in your own city. Troops were pouring in – there were some 700 or 800 raw boys from the shires chiefly – in the Castle yard, with artillery on its way. The G.P.O. & Four Courts, the Royal College of Surgeons (which the Volunteers call their Military Hospital & call upon the authorities to respect under Geneva Convention!) & houses scattered over the city are held against the troops. Musketry pops away all day & from every quarter. Yet men women & children still frequent the streets unconcerned. Birrell has come over & is safely lodged at the Vice Regal. The Provinces are reported quiet. But the communications are badly interrupted. I got back about 7 & found Cruise O’Brien in from Bray having trained to Kingstown & then walked. No trains on Harcourt St Line. I had to tell him his wife’s brother in law Sheehy Skeffington had been shot.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 01/Dec/2019 10:11:03

    Read more transcripts from the diaries of Horace Plunkett HERE

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    Hannahs Lens

    • 04/Dec/2019 00:45:33

    There were Boudoir Chairs in the nineteenth Century,usually made of Velvet and had no armrests: The servants could carry you up the stairs If it was too much for her Ladyship:

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    Dr. Ilia

    • 12/Dec/2019 08:00:08

    Well captured