Passage

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Where: Munster, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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When I saw the title in the catalogue I thought that this might not be a great shot but I am happy to post such a fine view! This is a beautiful Poole Collection image and away from the studio shots that we expect. The scene has changed somewhat over the years but not that much. I stood on those heights a few years ago watching the Tall Ships pass down to the sea, magic!

Photographer: A. H. Poole

Collection: Poole Photographic Studio, Waterford

Date: ca. 7 May 1905

NLI Ref: POOLEWP 0504

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 5423
ahpoole arthurhenripoole glassnegative nationallibraryofireland passageeast cowaterford piers ferry duncannon crook hook poolephotographiccollection

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  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 18/Dec/2019 08:48:09

    Somewhere near here? goo.gl/maps/SeLi1S5P3KZXMM35A It has hardly changed in 115 years. 7 May 1905 was a Sunday ... hence the Sunday best hats?

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    suckindeesel

    • 18/Dec/2019 09:23:26

    A sidecar and a bicycle. Passage East, not the other one.

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    suckindeesel

    • 18/Dec/2019 09:52:42

    Strongbow landed here in 1170, on his second visit, with several hundred knights. A ferry operated at the time of photo, and still does, acrosss the Suir to Ballyhack in Co. Wexford, saving over 30-miles by road. The notorious Geneva barracks were just south of here.

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    John Spooner

    • 18/Dec/2019 11:11:34

    Megazoom releals some men standing in the street (just outside what is now the post office ) with their hands in their pockets, as if waiting for a bar to open. Could this possibly be a clue as to the time of day the picture was taken? (just before 2 p.m. if my understanding of Irish licensing laws in the early 20th century is correct)

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    Swordscookie

    • 18/Dec/2019 11:58:18

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ yes John, on a Sunday that would have been right for those outside of Dublin. Dublin enjoyed the "Holy Hour" until quite recently but that only applied Monday to Saturday.

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    suckindeesel

    • 18/Dec/2019 13:58:12

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner The pub hasn’t survived, although the Constabulary Barracks seems to have morphed into the Garda Station. There’s a second group of idlers hanging around in another street.

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    suckindeesel

    • 18/Dec/2019 14:01:33

    It’s a lovely shot, with the sidecar adding human interest. I wonder if that was just happenstance or perhaps arranged. People in those old photos always looked like they were happy to pose for the photographer, probably a great novelty at that time.

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    rsb62rsb

    • 19/Dec/2019 07:44:32

    A bicycle always improves a photograph 😄. Wonder where the bicyclist is?

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 19/Dec/2019 08:15:12

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Perhaps he/she is taking the photograph?

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    Dr. Ilia

    • 19/Dec/2019 09:00:06

    just beautiful!

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    suckindeesel

    • 19/Dec/2019 14:41:13

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Could only guess as to purpose of poles, perhaps for hanging nets to dry? Not navigtional I think, there is a navigational buoy out in the estuary, called the "Spit Light", barely visible in photo.

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    Swordscookie

    • 19/Dec/2019 21:16:42

    I was at the tall ships in Waterford as well and this was taken quite close to where Mr. Poole would have been set up! https://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie/5899995853/in/album-72157627108646298/ Unfortunately I was looking at the ships coming down the Suir and did not get to shoot in the direction of Passage.

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    sam2cents

    • 20/Dec/2019 19:53:00

    Fantastic scenery, and a palpable sense of the moment, which is unusual in photos more weighted in history.

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    rsb62rsb

    • 20/Dec/2019 21:28:05

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland yes - could be. I wonder what size camera (glass plate?) they had, and how far they cycled with it? Obviously made of sterner stuff than modern weight weenies.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 23/Dec/2019 06:26:53

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Roger, they were great men and women and really dedicated to their craft.