The Dreaded Weed

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Where: Unknown

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When: 27 April 1954

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As a thank you to all our supporters, followers, and Flickroonies for the 90 million views, and this week’s tremendous work we have The State Express Tobacco Factory from the Morgan Aerial Photographic Collection. There were a number of tobacco factories in Ireland at that time but I must admit that this is the first time I heard of the State Express factory. I suspect that this is one that we can safely say is “no longer standing”?

Photographer: Alexander Campbell “Monkey” Morgan

Collection: Morgan Aerial Photographic Collection

Date: Tuesday, 27 April 1954

NLI Ref: NPA MOR16

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 5941
morganaerialphotographiccollection nationallibraryofireland ireland bw alexandercampbellmorgan captainacmorgan monkeymorgan piperapache eiajl westonaerodrome phaseboxes mylar aerial stateexpresstobaccofactory codublin suburbanstreets keyhole dublin leinster factory tuesday crumlin astortobacco seanlemass fox 1954 cashelroad captainsroad roadstone davisking crampton fjfox mellowsco alumellpatentdoubleglazing

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  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 29/Jan/2021 09:25:35

    I found a reference to "State Express" being manufactured in a factory on the Cashel Road, Dublin, and the roads appear to match in this Google Satellite View.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 29/Jan/2021 09:29:44

    State Express 555, Ardath tobacco company

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    Rory_Sherlock

    • 29/Jan/2021 09:30:52

    Streetview: www.google.com/maps/@53.3166933,-6.3020447,3a,75y,104.34h...

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    sharon.corbet

    • 29/Jan/2021 09:31:10

    Looking on Streetview , at least the office block parts of the buildings at the front seem to be still there, even if the manufacturing part has been obviously altered.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 29/Jan/2021 09:34:42

    27 April 1954 was a Tuesday ...

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    sharon.corbet

    • 29/Jan/2021 09:40:17

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] That building has "Standard Cars McEntagart Bros Ltd. Triumph Cars" on it, so I presume the tobacco factory is the one on the right.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 29/Jan/2021 09:46:02

    Sometimes Flickr is amazing! [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia/50887102126/] Google Maps 3D Satellite (takes a while to load) - www.google.com/maps/@53.3157588,-6.3067284,142a,35y,90.36...

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 29/Jan/2021 09:55:23

    [Aside] 'Aussie Tucker' (see note) has "didgeridoo fries" on the menu. I need a full report! - www.aussietucker.ie/?l=en

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 29/Jan/2021 09:58:46

    How "State Express" trademark name came to be - www.cigarettespedia.com/index.php/ManufacturerArdath_Toba...

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 29/Jan/2021 10:16:01

    www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/50859612736/ Via [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] Heaps more State Express cigarette memorabilia on Flickr - www.flickr.com/search/?text=state%20express%20cigarette

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    Bernard Healy

    • 29/Jan/2021 11:35:57

    Unsurprisingly, all fields in the 25" OS map. A few big houses & a corn mill nearby, but the area covered by the photo was pretty much just fields. There seems to have been an article about the 'Astor' Tobacco Factory on Cashel Road, Kimmage in the June 1954 edition of 'The Irish Architect & Contractor' paddi.net/?func=display_document&document_id=12182 Architect possibly Joseph Kidney? paddi.net/?func=display_structure&structure_id=349&am... Seemingly cars were assembled at the Standard Triumph Factory next to the Tobacco factory: www.trregisterireland.ie/about/

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    John Spooner

    • 29/Jan/2021 12:03:21

    Drogheda Independent - Saturday 18 December 1954: Drogheda Independent - Saturday 18 December 195

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 29/Jan/2021 12:20:33

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia https://www.flickr.com/photos/lizinitaly https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy In the Irish Times on the 27th April 1954 there is a full page about the Factory in Crumlin. "The most modern tobacco factory in the world" is the claim made by the directors of the Astor Tobacco Company for their new factory which was officially opened in Crumlin yesterday by the Minister for Industry and Commerce (Mr Sean Lemass) Mr F. J. Fox was chairman and managing director. 75% of the factory's output was intended for export. The old factory was in Fownes Street. There are lots of adverts from businesses associated with the new factory including one from Astor itself saying that it is privileged to manufacture on behalf of the House of State Express. Other adverts from Crampton the builders, Davis King suppliers of sanitary fittings, Mellows & Co London supplied "Alumell" Double patent glazing. Roadstone were in there too. It is interesting that the photo is dated the day after the opening, I wonder did Mr Morgan take the photo after reading the Irish Times in the hope of subsequently selling the photograph to the factory?

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    Swordscookie

    • 29/Jan/2021 12:25:10

    The Triumph factory later became the British Leyland factory. A cashier there, James Farrell, was murdered by an IRA gang carrying out some "fundraising" on 3rd Augush 1973. He was delivering the cash for the wages driving a Triumph Stag with injection ignition when the car was rammed at the front. He reversed rapidly but the car cut out due to fault in the ignition system and the robbers ran down and shot him through the glass. They then took off with the money but were later captured and convicted. One of them was shot in 1975 while trying to escape from Portlaoise Prison!

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    Niall McAuley

    • 29/Jan/2021 12:30:23

    Ardath made State Express and also Astorias American Blend in the UK. Not sure how Astor fitted in.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 29/Jan/2021 12:46:55

    Born in 1913, Frederic (Freddie) was the fourth of five children and the youngest of James Fox’s three sons.He found himself in charge of the family business, a single cigar shop on Dublin’s Grafton Street, after the untimely death of his two brothers. Stanley Fox was shot dead by armed thieves thought to be members of the IRA in 1926, while Ronald (Biffy) was missing in action over the Dutch coast in 1942 during an RAF mine laying mission. Freddie, not content with just one shop, took the business from strength to strength. He established a successful import and wholesale business in Ireland alongside the world’s first Duty Free outlet which expanded the retail cigar business into London. He developed numerous brands including Punch Nectares, Bolivar Amado, Hoyo Royal Hunt and La Corona Policromia, and established the Astor Tobacco Company. His enterprising nature also saw Freddie acquire and develop a successful import and wholesale business in the Channel Islands; and he oversaw the origin of the business’s entry into the property markets, developing several high profile office buildings in St Helier, Jersey including Sir Walter Raleigh House on the Esplanade. Freddie Fox died in 1990.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 29/Jan/2021 12:47:58

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] From the IT it seem that this is the Astor Factory and that they manufactured some products on behalf of State express. See ths Morgan shot from 1955 catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000733424 It is titled Astor Tobacco factory, Crumlin, Co. Dublin

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    sharon.corbet

    • 29/Jan/2021 12:48:46

    He was either up again in March 1955 or some of the dates are wrong. (I haven't tried playing spot the difference yet.)

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    Niall McAuley

    • 29/Jan/2021 12:52:37

    Stanley and his father James are in the 1911 census: census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Dublin/Terenure/Eat...

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 29/Jan/2021 12:56:38

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet they are different - see cars parked in front of factory.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 29/Jan/2021 12:57:33

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Unlike the 1955 pic linked by Sharon which has an authentically 1950s car out front, todays shot has a very Ministerial looking machine at the door... Lemass at the opening? Maybe not, would expect at least a flag on the pole...

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    Niall McAuley

    • 29/Jan/2021 13:00:58

    The bicycle shed is full, suggesting the workforce are present...

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 29/Jan/2021 13:03:12

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Eaton Square is only about 2km from the factory!

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    Niall McAuley

    • 29/Jan/2021 13:04:44

    North corner of the site is cleaned up by 1955

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    Bernard Healy

    • 29/Jan/2021 13:06:22

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley James J Fox still extant on Grafton Street, as I understand it.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 29/Jan/2021 13:11:21

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Yes, on the corner with College Green, James J. Fox, Cigars and Whiskey, est 1881

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    Bernard Healy

    • 29/Jan/2021 13:35:29

    I'm wondering if there's a 3rd factory that we should be trying to identify? We have Standard Cars & the Astor Tobacco factory on Cashel Road. But behind Standard Cars there is a 3rd factory which seems to be seperated from the other two by fencing. I think it's on Clonard Road. I'm far from certain. but might it be related to this entry? www.dia.ie/works/view/33981/building/CO.+DUBLIN%2C+DUBLIN....

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    O Mac

    • 29/Jan/2021 14:12:35

    Dublin Dairies is on the far right. What looks like a row of trucks are horse dray milk floats. Rows of churns can also be seen clearer in this other Monkey Morgan that Sharon linked. catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000733424/MooviewerImg?mobile...

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    sharon.corbet

    • 29/Jan/2021 14:14:46

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy] I'm not sure. Johnson Bros were at 390-96 Clonard Road in the 50s, which I think is the factory directly on Clonard Road, and beyond McEntagerts (see this photo. (here-ish on Streetview. The third factory seems to be behind the houses on Clonard Road, and accessible then by this laneway.

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    Bernard Healy

    • 29/Jan/2021 14:30:02

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] At some stage I expect we'll have a photo that'll lead to us discussing the merger of the various dairies of Dublin. irishphotoarchive.photoshelter.com/image/I0000p3.6MXawWHY In 1966 three Dublin dairies - including Dublin Dairies Ltd - became Premier Dairies, with 1969 seeing Hughes Brothers selling their milk division to Premier.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 29/Jan/2021 15:02:17

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy] This might be another option, but I haven't yet found a street number for them.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 29/Jan/2021 15:29:26

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet] I think you are on the right track - see Vedoneire History

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    Bernard Healy

    • 29/Jan/2021 15:52:17

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland It's surprising how little there is online. Although I suspect that a native of the area could probably answer all our questions immediately.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 29/Jan/2021 16:55:54

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland I saw that, but wasn't sure it helped much - I have no idea if that's a 4 acre site for example. I did have a look around, but everything I found just says "Clonard Road". Though that may just be because it is actually not a numbered entrance and I don't see any other sites on the Clonard Road where it could have been, so? https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy There's always this weird gap where it's too recent to be regarded as "proper" history, but too long ago to be online. It's very annoying.

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    cargeofg

    • 29/Jan/2021 17:02:17

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie Never got to go to the British Leyland factory at Crumlin but was in the Sales office in Percy Place with my mother to collect our Triumph 2000 after it had to be resprayed under warranty. That would be about 1971/72. Triumph Stags had a V8 engine.

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    suckindeesel

    • 29/Jan/2021 18:21:14

    From an IT article, which lists the models assembled there. Also says plant was managed by a certain Matt McQuaid, brother to that scourge of 50s Dublin Catholics. "The company marketing Rover at the time was known as Standard-Triumph (Éire) Ltd which had its head office in Percy Place, Dublin 4. The managing director was the late Matt McQuaid, a half-brother of Dr John Charles McQuaid, archbishop of Dublin. McQuaid's son, Dene, remembers that the assembly operation was very small: "The cars were built alongside Land Rovers and other models such as the Triumph Heralds. Land Rover, of course, was very much part of the Rover company at the time." Although some open fields still remained, this area was developed post-war by Dublin Corporation and housed former inner city dwellers. It was an enormous estate of corpo housing. Always wondered how we could build so many housing estates at a time when the country hadn't two pennies to rub together. A feat that seems impossible to accomplish today. Also visible is Corrib Rd. built by Guinness to house its employees. In the far distance I can see the house where I was born and the playground across the road. A bit of a nostalgia overload there. Cycled that road every day to work in the early 60s and it felt like the longest road in the world. Suggest it's Stannaway Drive, not Clonard Rd. for that other factory. Don't remember the cigarette factory but did once buy parts for a Spitfire from the Standard-Triumph plant. We had one of their cars, a Standard 8 or 10, in a recent street photo.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 30/Jan/2021 08:22:09

    Looking from Ravensdale Park at the building to the right/rear of the factory on Streetview, there is a symbol above the door incorporating 3 castles and a double D, Dublin Dairies I assume? streetview

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 30/Jan/2021 08:57:09

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Well spotted!!

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 30/Jan/2021 09:00:42

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley There is a lot of "agricultural" activity going on in the gardens at the rear of the houses in Cashel and Captains roads. Some of the gardens are very big. There is no sign of any home grown products in the streetviews.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 30/Jan/2021 10:15:56

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] If you look at this photo on Megazoom, you can see that there’s no real entrance from Stannaway Drive. The entrance is definitely between the houses onto Clonard Road.

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    suckindeesel

    • 30/Jan/2021 21:14:56

    U.K. National Archive discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/5ea5f7ad-8a8e... "The following files relate to McEntagart Bros. Ltd., Standard and Packard concessionaires, which had assembled Standard cars in Dublin since 1930; to their acquisition by Standard, 1955, and its operation as Standard-Triumph (Eire) Ltd.; and to an assembly agreement with the Rover Co. Ltd., 1961-3."

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 01/Feb/2021 07:42:56

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy Good finds, an uncle of mine worked for Johnson, I know for a fact that that premises was on Clonard Road but near the Stannaway Road end, it is not the "3rd Factory Building" noted on the photo by Bernard.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 01/Feb/2021 21:22:18

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland My assumption is that Johnson’s is the pretty big factory between Clonard Road and Stannaway Drive in the last photo I linked to. Definitely closer to to Stannaway Road.