The rocky road to nowhere?

Download this image

More from this collection

Related by When

Related by Where

Research Help!

Where: Leinster, Co Kildare, Ireland

Try to find the spot where the photographer was standing.

When: Unknown

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
The RFA (Royal Field Artillery?) Barracks in Kildare is the feature of this Eason image, though it looks like a drab and unusual terrace of houses. What were these houses? Were they billets for the troops, or married quarters?

+++ UPDATE +++
These were Married Quarters for the Royal Field Artillery in the barracks in Kildare, that went on to be called Magee Barracks from 1938. The odd curvy roof features have survived on some of the houses on what is now Magee Terrace in Kildare Town. John Spooner unearthed some frankly terrifying articles about ‘clean, cosy, and compact’ married quarters, from a woman’s perspective – this one from February 1900...

Photographer: Unknown

Collection: Eason Photographic Collection

Date: between 1900-1939 1906-1922

NLI Ref: EAS_2570

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 2466
eason easonson easoncollection easonphotographiccollection glassnegative 20thcentury nationallibraryofireland rfabarracks royalfieldartillery kildare countykildare marriedquarters billets leinster ireland mageeterrace mageebarracks

Add Tags
  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 12/Mar/2021 08:59:16

    Above each door MQ No. 14, 16 etc presumably Married Quarters.

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 12/Mar/2021 09:10:27

    "Two foreigners found sketching outside the Royal Field Artillery Barracks have been arrested at Kildare and are still in custody" (Belfast Telegraph - Monday 10 August 1914). Not the only people to be arrested that week for 'acting suspiciously with an odd accent'.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 12/Mar/2021 09:26:12

    One of the few bits of the barracks still standing: Magee Terrace on Streetview The NIAH lets us down today, no dates.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 12/Mar/2021 09:55:25

    The British Army were there from 1900 to 1922, according to this book review. Includes fascinating snippets about water, sanitation, and electricity - www.theirishstory.com/2014/09/01/book-review-kildare-barr...

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 12/Mar/2021 10:04:02

    More history of what later became Magee Barracks - www.abandonedireland.com/Magee_Barracks.html

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 12/Mar/2021 10:06:27

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia So there is an earliest date: Built in 1901 to train British artillery brigades for service in the Boer War And of course latest date is 1922, since it was not a Royal Anything Barracks from that time.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 12/Mar/2021 10:12:10

    More history - forum.irishmilitaryonline.com/showthread.php?12847-Magee-... It's strange - no-one around, not even women and ankle-biters. But there are pot plants, net curtains, and open windows. Before the Irish Army moved in and repainted the signs?

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 12/Mar/2021 10:17:15

    A later earliest date for the MQ? Kildare Observer and Eastern Counties Advertiser - Saturday 20 January 1906: "Tenders are hereby invited for the Erection of 20 Married Soldiers' Quarters at Kildare barracks"

  • profile

    Carol Maddock

    • 12/Mar/2021 10:24:23

    From the Irish Times, 17 February 2016:

    The Kildare barracks was built in 1900 on the site of the former Lock Hospital. The 31st and 33rd Brigades were the first army divisions to be stationed there along with the Royal Field Artillery. All of them served in the first World War. After the War of Independence and the signing of the treaty, British troops moved out and they were replaced by the Irish Artillery Corp which consisted of five officers, 18 NCOs and 93 gunners. A new barracks was built on site in 1938, and was named after gunner James Magee, formerly of the Mayo Militia, who switched sides and raised the Irish flag at the Battle of Ballinamuck in September 1798. Magee was later captured and executed by British forces. The barracks eventually closed in 1998.

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 12/Mar/2021 10:28:18

    How married quarters were furnished (London Daily News - Friday 22 August 1902) London Daily News - Friday 22 August 1902

  • profile

    Carol Maddock

    • 12/Mar/2021 10:31:28

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Ooooh, “unreasonable attachment ... may cause some trouble”. There’s a story there, if not multiple stories!

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 12/Mar/2021 11:23:12

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] "The action of the military authorities in causing the wives of the 2nd Battalion Somerset Regiment to vacate their married quarters is much resented by some of the women. Whatever the reason, all the women have received instructions to make other arrangements for lodgings." (Taunton Courier, and Western Advertiser - Wednesday 24 January 1900). I guess the men of the 2nd Battalion were in South Africa. It sounds as if the women had an unreasonable attachment to having a roof over their heads.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 12/Mar/2021 11:29:59

    Originally two up, two down, three fireplaces by the look of it. In some cases, two of the original microhomes have been converted to one small house today.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 12/Mar/2021 11:38:43

    In this streetview, you can see that on the gable end of the terrace, there is still a sign saying Married Quarters 1-20, but it is in Irish too, so I'd say the sign dates from after 1922.

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 12/Mar/2021 12:02:21

    How to qualify for 'clean, cosy and compact' married quarters, from the Woman's World page of the Weekly Dispatch (London) - Sunday 04 February 1900 Weekly Dispatch (London) - Sunday 04 February 1900

  • profile

    Carol Maddock

    • 12/Mar/2021 12:30:41

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Crikey. That's some palaver, isn't it?

  • profile

    silverio10

    • 13/Mar/2021 20:23:47

    Buenas fotos antiguas .

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 14/Mar/2021 13:37:13

    "As I turn, already yearning, there’s a truth that I am learning – Loneliness commences burning, deep within my broken heart. Now the captains voice is urging and the engine begins surging. Frosty air and steam are merging as my eyes rapidly dart Toward the gate, where she is clinging. The conductor’s bell is ringing. All the soldiers take up singing, as the train slowly departs While my soul is torn apart." Ode To A Soldier's Wife - Dusty Grein

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 15/Mar/2021 08:22:06

    I hadn't realised before that much of the council housing around Dublin (and presumably elsewhere) was modelled on this design, with the regular gable pairs interspersed with terraces. e.g. Ballyfermot goo.gl/maps/juQvKALQwAocY4Bg6, Phibsboro goo.gl/maps/VUBWvHawebEmehw86, Whitehall goo.gl/maps/kCpoQcZGvuYbH9C87

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 15/Mar/2021 08:50:56

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Interesting observation. Thanks.

  • profile

    Dr. Ilia

    • 16/Mar/2021 09:00:03

    just beautiful!