New invention – Opening a window to the world

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The title on this Poole image is Patent Clasp – Commissioned by Mr. Nolan, Annaville, Waterford, and shows an elaborate window opening device. It would appear that Mr. Nolan was an inventor, and his “Clasp” seems to have been well worked on to look so finished. I wonder did it take off, and make the man a fortune?

Photographer: A. H. Poole

Collection: Poole Photographic Collection, Waterford

Date: Between 1901-1954

NLI Ref: POOLEWP 2713

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 6059
ahpoole arthurhenripoole poolecollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland windowmockup windowopeningdevice mrnolan annaville waterford nolan poolephotographiccollection patent inventions fuinneog munster ireland limerickbybeachcomber

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  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 24/Mar/2021 09:04:34

    This might or might not be the right Nolan, but the Waterford Standard of Saturday 29 January 1949 has the obituary of Mr R.B. ("Bennie") Nolan of Annaville, aged 60. He had carried on the building and contracting business started by his father and was one of the largest employers in the building trade. Perhaps he commissioned the photo on behalf of an inventive employee?

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 24/Mar/2021 09:05:18

    Well, this seems to be Annaville: www.buildingsofireland.ie/buildings-search/building/22831...

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 24/Mar/2021 09:11:45

    Bennie Nolan's brother's father in law was Grand National winner Joe WIdger Hat-trick

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 24/Mar/2021 09:18:20

    Problem No. 1 - this window can't cope with an insect screen. Mozzie heaven!

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 24/Mar/2021 09:22:55

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Why would one need an insect screen???

  • profile

    Carol Maddock

    • 24/Mar/2021 09:23:29

    I'm also seeing mentions of a George Nolan of Annaville. He was an Alderman, and Mrs George did good works.

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 24/Mar/2021 09:27:43

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] George is mentioned in Bennie's obituary as a solicitor and coroner. And elsewhere his daughter was a racehorse owner in the 1930s.

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 24/Mar/2021 09:29:06

    Reminds me of a primitive Velux

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 24/Mar/2021 09:33:06

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Comfort, health, hygiene ...

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 24/Mar/2021 09:35:49

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia An Australian cousin came to visit and the first thing he said when he came into our home was where were the screens? I was looking at him for a moment but we don't need them here! The rain keeps them well away:-)

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 24/Mar/2021 09:40:39

    Waterford Standard - Saturday 01 April 1933 had a report on the Corporation Housing Scheme (of which R B Nolan was a contractor). The Borough Surveyor said:

    "For the windows of these scheme I have specified sliding sashes fitted with Mullins' patent window lock. Hitherto it was necessary to use friction roller sash balances but the friction rollers were not satisfactory. The Mullins patent is simple and cheap."

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 24/Mar/2021 09:43:32

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner It was April Fool's Day!

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 24/Mar/2021 10:17:50

    See the bottom left corner of this page from the 1935 Capuchin Annual flic.kr/p/2kNJ7xE

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 24/Mar/2021 10:30:25

    Looks good...tho' there has to be a catch somewhere.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 24/Mar/2021 10:40:43

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] ... there are strings attached!

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 24/Mar/2021 10:50:02

    Richard Benedict Nolan - his death cert in 1949: civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/churchrecords/images/death... I note that he was a bachelor (age 66) & the death was notified by his brother Joseph A Nolan of Annaville. So these seem to be the Nolans in 1901: www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1901/Waterford/Water... Although that would make for an 8 year discrepancy between Richard B Nolan's age in the census and his age at death.

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 24/Mar/2021 10:50:55

    The locks in this advert (Weekly Dispatch (London) - Sunday 25 June 1939) look nothing like the Poole picture Weekly Dispatch (London) - Sunday 25 June 1939 but P & H Egan, Ltd, who in the 1930s advertised that they could deliver a huge range of building materials including Mullins Patent Window Fittings, suggesting Mullins didn't confine themselves to inventing locks but also other window fitments (dare I suggest clasps?)

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 24/Mar/2021 11:15:54

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner] Re: F Mullins, Boreenmanna Road, I stumbled across this wonderful article: www.irishexaminer.com/property/arid-20072158.html Just going to market is the semi-detached ‘Rhodesia’, a double-fronted house with immense character, along with an old-fashioned former factory building of 3,500 sq ft with outline planning for two more/replacement houses. Motorists on the last leg of the city’s link road will be more than familiar with this Old Blackrock Road/Boreenmanna Road property mix, totalling a quarter acre with development potential. The fine, solid, family home was built back in the late 1920s/1930s by a Freddie Mullins, along with an adjoining matching or mirror image house, St Finbarr’s. Like many others building in Cork at the time, he integrated salvaged items from the wreck of the liner into the houses’ interiors, such as pressed metal ceilings, doors with portholes and oak stair spindles. The Celtic went aground in December 1928 when en route from Liverpool to New York, with more than 500 crew and passengers on board. Streetview for those who are curious: goo.gl/maps/HmADCSTXL7egjL18A

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 24/Mar/2021 18:51:24

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ at least it's not unhinged like some around these parts.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 24/Mar/2021 20:33:55

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] An open and shut case; that's clear to see.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 24/Mar/2021 21:20:56

    The Pretentious Metaphysical Limerick A man that looks on glass Might choose through it to pass The heav'n to espy Or maybe stay his eye On hinge and clasps of brass.
    With infinite apologies to George Herbert (1593 - 1633) www.georgeherbert.org.uk/archives/selected_work_20.html

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 24/Mar/2021 22:48:35

    "I’ve heard it said, there’s a window that opens from one mind to another. But if there is no wall there is no window, And if there is no window, there is no need for a latch" Jalāl ad-Dīn Mohammad Rūmī, 13th century

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 25/Mar/2021 06:33:25

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Very good.