Which one would you like, Madam?

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Where: Unknown

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When: 24 September 1926

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Waterford has had a tradition of meat processing, and we have seen the various versions of that over the years. Here is another example with Mr. M. O’Regan’s premises on Georges Street. A fine selection of bodies lined up, and that is just the butchers themselves! Once I saw the shot with the messenger bike on display, I thought of the late Christy Hennessy, the singer/songwriter who hailed from Waterford and his song “Messenger Boy”! He would identify!

Photographer: A. H. Poole

Collection: Poole Photographic Collection, Waterford

Date: ca. 24 September 1926

NLI Ref: POOLEWP 3397

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie


Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 3940
ahpoole arthurhenripoole poolecollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland georgesstreet waterford countywaterford mrmoregan butchers carcasses messengerbike victualler virtualler

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  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 16/Jun/2021 07:58:38

    A band of brothers? www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Waterford/Water...

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 16/Jun/2021 07:59:40

    It's a subway now: goo.gl/maps/ss6pu7VJHJJnRSNR9

  • profile

    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 16/Jun/2021 08:03:12

    "This house, built as one of a pair [...], is an attractive composition of balanced proportions that retains its original form to the upper floors, together with important early surviving features and materials. The house is an important component of the streetscape, contributing to the historic character of Great George’s Street." National Inventory of Architectural Heritage www.buildingsofireland.ie/buildings-search/building/22501...

  • profile

    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 16/Jun/2021 08:03:47

    Where did it all go wrong? www.google.ie/maps/@52.2616545,-7.1131001,3a,49.5y,241.3h...

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 16/Jun/2021 08:16:07

    youtu.be/f2vx5KOWblA

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 16/Jun/2021 08:20:47

    " In Ireland, victualler is a term for a butcher. " via - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victualler 24 September 1926 was a Friday . . .

  • profile

    John A. Coffey

    • 16/Jun/2021 08:58:58

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia No meat on a friday

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 16/Jun/2021 09:11:09

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] They're just open to sell to the non-conformists. Very hypocritical.

  • profile

    Swordscookie

    • 16/Jun/2021 09:13:15

    Before Christy Hennessy the late Hal Roche (Irish Comedian) was a messenger boy in Waterford. My late mother-in-law knew him and he was a real cheeky chappy. He tormented the girls and she never forgave him! Here is Christy singing his song: www.youtube.com/watch?v=xgLTe34MGYM

  • profile

    Swordscookie

    • 16/Jun/2021 09:14:35

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Slaughtering had to be done and meat hung for sales on a Saturday and the weekend so practicality rather than hypocrisy?

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 16/Jun/2021 10:29:21

    www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/, on behalf of the town of Tralee, I have to point out that Christy Hennessy - born Edward Christopher Ross - was a native of our town. I know that even Homer nods, but I expect better of our Marys. ;)

  • profile

    Foxglove

    • 16/Jun/2021 10:31:41

    as a child I used to make sticky sawdust "castles" when blood still dripped to the floor. sticking your head into the carcase and shouting or singing was another abherent form of entertainment. watching butchers actually butcher sides of meat was fascinating

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 16/Jun/2021 10:36:39

    Sometimes flickr is amazing! Read the blurb and see this photo in the window, via https://www.flickr.com/photos/ministry/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/ministry/38317550624/

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 16/Jun/2021 10:43:29

    I used to work in a butcher shop when I was a boy (in the 1990s!) and I've done my best to tag the different kinds of meat hanging out front. You wouldn't get away with hanging meat out front like that in Ireland anymore - although I do sometimes see something like this when I'm abroad, however, with the exception of the fact that the lambs' heads are usually removed these days, what you see is pretty much what you'll find in the walk-in coldroom of any good butcher shop or small abbatoir. A close family member worked as a butcher until about a decade ago, and any of the three guys with the aprons would look the part in a modern butcher shop. Nowadays the aprons tend of be of a kind of plasticised fabric for ease of cleaning, but the aesthetic is the same. The guy next to the bike, however, with his coat - probably brown or green or khaki, I guess - is more of a blast from the past. That kind of coat was very common amongst shop assistants, but you really only see it in very, very old-fashioned establishments these days. My dad was a shop assistant up until some time in the 1970s, and he had a coat like that when he was in that job, but when I was growing up in the 1980s there were maybe only one or two places in Tralee where older workers/proprietors kept up the tradition of having a shop coat like that.

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 16/Jun/2021 10:52:47

    Waterford Standard - Saturday 12 July 1930. Did the introduction of meat vans mean the end of O'Regan's bike deliveries? Friday was the day if you lived in Tramore. oregan

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 16/Jun/2021 11:08:49

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy] I hope you treated the sausage machine with due respect amputated (Waterford Standard - Saturday 07 March 1931)

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 16/Jun/2021 11:49:14

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner OUCH! I was never trusted with anything as dangerous as knives or a sausage machine. (I was never known for being particularly handy!) I did use the mincer, but the model we had was pretty idiot-proof. I do have a scar from my butchershop days, though. But it didn't come from processing meat. I was carrying a 4 stone (25kg) bag of potatoes for a customer. Potatoes used to come in these brown sacks, with the neck of the bag secured by a twist of wire. I'd often have to deliver them to customers - on a handtruck if I was taking them to someone's house, or carried on my shoulder if I was taking them to a nearby parked car. Anyway, I had this 4 stone bag of spuds on my right shoulder, and as I hefted it into a customer's car boot, the twist of wire scraped me along the base of my right thumb. I didn't notice it bleeding until a minute or two later, and despite it not being much of a cut, it left a nice inch-and-a-half scar on my hand.

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 16/Jun/2021 14:14:18

    Deliveries by bike in 1926, by van to Tramore in 1930. Mrs Katherine Walsh of Glenmore received 4 lbs of chops every week from O'Regans by post. These chops played a central role in a court case reported on the front page of the Waterford Standard on Saturday 22 July 1933. The headline and successive sub-headings were "A Disappointed Legatee", Civil Bill for Chops, Waterford Butcher's Claim, and "A Mysterious Contract".

  • profile

    CASSIDY PHOTOGRAPHY

    • 16/Jun/2021 14:52:58

    My father-in-law owned a butcher shop. I would help out by making repairs to various equipment and installed a new seal on the walk-in refrigerator. Sadly, he retired. My wife and I ate well and never bought any meat from the major chain supermarkets, during that time. We always paid, though at a discount.

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 16/Jun/2021 17:15:37

    Saw an FX Buckley van heading north on the A1 yesterday, didn't know they made deliveries that far away. Perhaps a load of Boris's forbidden sausages

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 16/Jun/2021 17:53:30

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy I should have known better and not go by an interview half remembered from years ago. Perhaps it was a file interview with Hal Roche and they played the song to illustrate his story???? (digging furiously but getting deeper and deeper in the mire)

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 16/Jun/2021 18:00:10

    "Mr Leopold Bloom ate with relish the inner organs of beasts and fowls. He liked thick giblet soup, nutty gizzards, a stuffed roast heart, liverslices fried with crustcrumbs, fried hencods' roes. Most of all he liked grilled mutton kidneys which gave to his palate a fine tang of faintly scented urine."

  • profile

    ofarrl

    • 16/Jun/2021 18:18:28

    One of my grand aunts, Eileen McDonald, was married to Michael O'Regan's brother Patrick who was also a butcher I believe. According to one of Patrick's grandsons the man on the right is Michael O'Regan.

  • profile

    cargeofg

    • 16/Jun/2021 18:40:14

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy I know exactly what you mean with the 4stone bag of spuds and the wire twist. In my fathers shop in Mullingar we would do daily deliveries of groceries around town morning and afternoon. Some of our customers with larger families would have said bag 4 stone spuds with their order. On your shoulder out of the back of the Austin Mini Estate we used for deliveries, in the front door to the kitchen or through to a shed at rear of house. I also used to have to weigh them out into 1/4sth or 1/2stn clear poly bags for sale in the shop. I have the original shop bike and hope to restore it and when we return to a more normal way of life ride it in the shop bike parade/outing in Dublin .Messenger boys and yard boys always wore brown shop coats and internal shop staff were white.

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 16/Jun/2021 19:09:37

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] The first job I'd do most mornings in the shop - long before it opened - was to break 4 stone spud bags into 7lb and 14lb plastic bags for sale that day. I got very good at estimating weights and am convinced that those hours of packing paid off when I won a "guess the weight of a cake" competition a few years ago!

  • profile

    silverio10

    • 16/Jun/2021 21:54:48

    Buenas fotos antiguas .

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 17/Jun/2021 06:39:38

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy I imagine knowing the quality of the cake maker might have been nearly as important. Some could turn a feather light sponge into a lead ingot with a similar taste!!!!!

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 17/Jun/2021 07:55:00

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ I got to lift the cake in my hands before making my guess. Then I translated it into potatoes and made my guess! ☺️

  • profile

    cargeofg

    • 17/Jun/2021 09:05:57

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy I know exactly what you mean. My instructions were not to but all the big spuds in one lot of bags and small ones in others. I used to open about 3 of the 4stn bags and tip them out to mix them up. This was in the corner of the shed/store with two unopened 4stn bags making up the other sides of the square. Then sit on a Taylor-Keith or Cidona crate and proceed to fill the bags. Always kept a handful of small spuds on the bench beside the scales to add if you were underweight. Like you, good at guessing/estimating weight. Gone metric now and compare to a 1KG bag of sugar or if very heavy 20kg bag of cement.

  • profile

    Ian Hannigan

    • 20/Jun/2021 09:21:00

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy this is true. Great pic though!

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 24/Jun/2021 16:15:58

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] Any relation? www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2021/jun/23/lemur-kidnap...

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 25/Jun/2021 04:30:47

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] :-)

  • profile

    Billy Quinn 1954

    • 22/Jul/2021 08:21:40

    Seeing that you asked, and you did, this was my favourite picture so far. It was so easy to change the sign to update it, sure'n the letters were already there, begorrah, any eejit could have done it. I like to think he (Mr. O' Regan) was an early 'Virtual' pioneer, and expert in the Non-fungible, doing de Selby proud, even. The butcher shop was very obviously a 'front'. Changing the sign on the bike was a little more fiddly. But then we all know the trouble with bikes, annotated by De Selby, in his lost manuscripts.

  • profile

    Billy Quinn 1954

    • 22/Jul/2021 08:21:45

    Purveyors of the Fungible

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Jul/2021 08:52:30

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/mutter_fluffer I will tag Virtualler to make it easy for you to find this photo in the furure.

  • profile

    Billy Quinn 1954

    • 22/Jul/2021 08:54:11

    That is very kind of you, Sir, do I just call you Mr. NloITC?

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Jul/2021 09:31:15

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/mutter_fluffer Mary will do, there are a few Marys who volunteer here daily. The genesis of the use of the name can be seen in the comments on the following photo. https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/16037291180/

  • profile

    Billy Quinn 1954

    • 22/Jul/2021 09:36:34

    Thank you Mary, I looked into the genesis of Mary before, with the help of the glorious Marina Warner, I talk about her a little on my stream somewhere, I'll try to find it for you. I also shared that entrance with you for a while, that lovely gate into your building, when I studied at the 'National College of Art and Design' when it was lodged there, in the backside of the Dail.

  • profile

    Billy Quinn 1954

    • 22/Jul/2021 09:37:39

    I had to steal this from the National Library of Ireland, they say there are no copyright restrictions, at all, at all.

  • profile

    Billy Quinn 1954

    • 22/Jul/2021 09:38:27

    Marina, and Mary, are both there, attached to another of your wonderful photos, stolen by yours truly. Mise le Meas, Billy Quinn