Clandeboye is very handy boy!

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Where: N Ireland, Ards and North Down, UK

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When: Unknown

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Clandeboye is one of those names that many Irish people will be familiar with but will not know where it comes from or what it looks like so here is a little insight. This fine manorial house standing in rolling, wooded countryside would appear to be either called Clandeboye or be in a place of that name?

Our image of Howth Abbey went to Explore over the weekend so thank you all for your input and research!

Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Circa 1865 - 1914 1904 or later.

NLI Ref: L_CAB_09078

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 4113
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio thelawrencephotographcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland clandeboye house bangor codown ulster northernireland

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  • profile

    Aperture111-Thanks for over 7 million views

    • 09/Aug/2021 07:59:21

    SPECIAL AWARD ★★★★★ 5 stars for your photo... Seen in:..Flickr Hall of Fame Flickr Hall of Fame (Post 1 – Award 1)

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    sharon.corbet

    • 09/Aug/2021 08:06:09

    The Clandeboye estate has a wiki page. We've been nearby a couple of times before [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/39943021785]

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    O Mac

    • 09/Aug/2021 08:34:53

    looks like some sort of anemometer or weather station on the roof.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 09/Aug/2021 09:06:47

    An unusual bit of fun from the always amazing NLI - an 1897 letter from the Marquis to Miss Hamilton inviting her to luncheon (at half past one), and instructions on how to get there - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000539843

    Miss C. J. Hamilton 2 Tiverton Mansions Gray's Inn Road London W.C. Clandeboye Mar 23.'97 My dear Miss Hamilton I need not say that it will give both Lady Dufferin and myself very great pleasure to receive you at Clandeboye. Perhaps you could come out to luncheon some day at 1/2 past one. Your best plan will be to come to Bangor, where there are always cars in attendance, and a twenty minutes' drive will bring you here. Believe me, Yours sincerely Dufferin and Ava

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    derangedlemur

    • 09/Aug/2021 09:09:00

    OSI: arcg.is/DHXCG0

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 09/Aug/2021 09:36:26

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] I think it is a 1820-ish weathervane (for wind direction). It's there in most other Lawrence photos. Except this one on the same day (by the windows and curtains) - Mr French chose a slightly different aspect, and the weathervane is hiding behind a chimney - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000318000 (fixed) Edit - similar to Mr Valentine's 1897 view, but no tree to the left of the house - later?

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    Niall McAuley

    • 09/Aug/2021 10:07:35

    The household in the 1901 census: The Marquess Frederick Temple Hamilton Temple-Blackwood, his wife Hariot Georgina, and 9 servants including a Butler, Private Secretary, Cook, Footman and 5 assorted maids.

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    derangedlemur

    • 09/Aug/2021 10:08:13

    It's a windy enough day if the state of the trees in the foreground is anything to go by.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 09/Aug/2021 10:23:18

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia The link in your last comment goes to the letter rather than a photo!

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 09/Aug/2021 10:30:52

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet Oops! Fixed now. Thanks!

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    O Mac

    • 09/Aug/2021 11:44:10

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ I think the weather vane may have been photoscraped and not hiding behind chimney as you suggest.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 09/Aug/2021 12:07:37

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] But the weathervane is not in the 1897 Valentine photo either. Similar angle to that other Lawrence. I think we are after 1897 due to that big tree near the left of the house obscuring the detached chimney in the Valentine. Google Maps 3D satellite is good (takes a while to load) - www.google.com/maps/@54.6405737,-5.7148389,56a,35y,323.1h... 2011 delightfully dotty documentary - BRILLIANT !! - youtu.be/lZZzUxTQvwM

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    Niall McAuley

    • 09/Aug/2021 12:13:22

    Nearby geographically and in the catalogue, L_CAB_09080 is the esplanade in Bangor. The cast iron drinking fountain shown is from 1895.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 09/Aug/2021 12:49:11

    L_ROY_09525 is from the same day (stepladder, curtains, window openings). There is a series of L_ROYs from Bangor after it in the catalogue, many featuring a visiting fleet in the bay. L_ROY_09541 includes a building dated 1904.

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    John Spooner

    • 09/Aug/2021 14:29:24

    Horrible Occurrence Klaxxon!!! Weekly Irish Times - Saturday 12 July 1884

    Horrible Occurrence at Clandeboye— A Keeper Attacked by a Bear. A very melancholy occurrence at Clandeboye, the Irish residence of Lord Dufferin, has just been made known. His lordship has had a Russian bear in large cage at Clandeboye for some time past, which he brought over with him on his last visit to Ireland. The bear was in charge of a keeper named Bell. Bell was on Saturday last putting the animal through certain customary exercises in the presence of Lord C'landeboye and some other gentlemen. An unexpected change in the temper and docility of the animal led to its attacking the keeper, and though Bell was armed with a pitchfork he found himself unable to cope with the bear, and the latter succeeded in seizing the unfortunate keeper by the throat and inflicting most serious wound him. Further injuries of a dangerous character were inflicted in the course of the fierce struggle, and although Lord Clandeboye end the other gentlemen present did all they could to rescue Bell they had not accomplished their object till the keeper was horribly torn and mutilated, and in state of complete unconsciousness. He was placed under medical treatment, and his recovery is considered exceedingly improbable, if not hopeless.
    The Northern Whig reported that a new keeper had been sent for. According to ST James's Gazette, the bear was from St Petersburg. The Ballymena Advertiser concluded: "The moral of the story is that implicit confidence should not be placed in the most amiable of bears when the temperature is high. "Scratch a Russian and you will find a Tartar." said Napoleon, and a bear irritated ceases to be genial beast." Weekly Irish Times - Saturday 26 July 1884 reported that as soon as he heard of the attack, Lord Clandeboye's father Lord Dufferin had ordered that the bear be destroyed and the carcase sent to England, and these orders had been carried out. PS no news of Bell's fate, but there was rejoicing on the Clandeboye estate at the end of the month when the 5th Viscount of Clandeboye came of age.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 09/Aug/2021 14:49:00

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Extremely "melancholy" indeed!

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    Niall McAuley

    • 09/Aug/2021 15:43:45

    L_ROY_09547 is still in Bangor, and shows a motorbike, EI 15, a very early Sligo reg, 1903 or soon after. L_ROY_09550 has a headstone dated 1901.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 09/Aug/2021 16:06:05

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] That Bicycle Ei 15 was owned by Wm. Ferguson, Manor Street, Belfast, in the LENNON & WYLIE, Irish Motor Directory 1914 - 1915

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 09/Aug/2021 16:08:05

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley I have changed the date to 1904 or later.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 09/Aug/2021 16:48:33

    At thepeerage dot com, we have Frederick Temple Hamilton-Temple-Blackwood as in the census, who died in 1902. The Marquess at the time of this photo was probably his son Terence John, who inherited in 1902 and died in 1919. Terence John had three daughters, and the title passed to his brother Frederick Temple, then Frederick's son Basil Sheridan and finally Basil's son Sheriden Frederick Terence. When he died in 1988 without children, his various titles expired too.

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    John Spooner

    • 09/Aug/2021 18:24:16

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley The Lord Clandeboye who fought the bear and came of age in July 1884 was Archibald James Leofric Temple Hamilton-Temple-Blackwood (b July 1863) who died at the Siege of Ladysmith in January 1900, 2 years before his father Frederick died, so didn't live long enough to inherit the title. Frederick was also in South Africa, while Terence was in the diplomatic service in Stockholm (Henley & South Oxford Standard - Friday 12 January 1900)