Inniscarra is in Cork!

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Where: Munster, Cork City, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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"A steam ship passing along the quays" the title says but that is a mooring rope at the bows so the ship is going nowhere. WE haven't had an O'Connor image for some time and a visit to Cork in the summer is always good, especially for those from Limerick who have bragging rights!

Photographer: Fergus O’Connor

Collection: Fergus O'Connor Collection

Date: Between 1903 and 12th May 1918

NLI Ref: OCO 288

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 3518
ferguso’connor ferguso’connorcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland cork quays ship theinniscarra steamship riverlee

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  • profile

    O Mac

    • 27/Aug/2021 07:29:19

    Photograph pre 12th May 1918 when sunk by U-boat 86 off Ballycotton. Launched 1903 www.tynebuiltships.co.uk/I-Ships/inniscarra1903.html

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 27/Aug/2021 07:36:50

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Date updated

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 27/Aug/2021 07:46:56

    Dockview (going by the St Luke's steeple and the third bay from the right on the warehouse) - goo.gl/maps/kJyCZjAGrSAY5Edh8 (fixed!)

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 27/Aug/2021 07:50:12

    She's flying the Blue Peter flag indicating she's about to head to sea.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 27/Aug/2021 07:51:16

    She is flying the Blue Peter flag, about to depart - "The blue Peter. In harbour: All persons should report on board as the vessel is about to proceed to sea. ... " See - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_maritime_signal_flags

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 27/Aug/2021 07:57:24

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Snap!

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 27/Aug/2021 08:02:33

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Is that a Blue Peter flag? ;-)

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 27/Aug/2021 08:07:55

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Well it's definitely not a dog.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 27/Aug/2021 08:12:32

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Very good!!

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    John Spooner

    • 27/Aug/2021 08:22:19

    Contemporary newspaper accounts of the sinking of the Inniscarra vary in detail, but this one contains most of the points they agree on (and contradicts itself as to whether the boats were lowered or not). The earliest report appeared on 25th of May, and none of the reports give a date for the sinking, so presumably the authorities suppressed the news for nearly 2 weeks. Northern Whig - Saturday 25 May 1918

    CORK STEAMER TORPEDOED 26 LIVES LOST. Intelligence has been received at Queenstown that the City of Cork Steam packet Company’s passenger steamer Inniscarra has been sunk by a German submarine. All board were lost except the captain, chief engineer, and three seamen, who were landed at Queenstown. The captain was injured. The vessel was bound from Fishguard to Cork. The Inniscarra, which was torpedoed on the morning of May 12th, sank in four minutes. Though the boats were lowered and manned they were unable to get clear and were sucked down with the ship. Afterwards the submarine rose to the surface and the commander questioned survivors, who were on raft, and handed them letters post with the instruction. "Post these to Lloyd George when you get ashore." The vessel carried a crew of thirty-one, but this trip had no passengers, carrying only a general cargo. From statements made by the survivors it would appear that Captain Kelly was on the bridge when the enemy submarine was sighted. Although all the boats were ready to be lowered case of necessity there was no time to do anything, the vessel went down head-foremost in four minutes after a torpedo had struck her amidships. The captain remained the bridge until the Inniscarra went down under him, and then while swimming about managed to cling to a raft from which he was subsequently taken by other survivors who had secured lifeboat. Tho men were two and a half hours adrift before they were rescued by a trawler.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 27/Aug/2021 08:28:29

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner I wonder what the letters said?

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 27/Aug/2021 08:41:12

    Via Trove, an American destroyer sank the U-boat soon after - trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/175503724?searchTerm=i...

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    John Spooner

    • 27/Aug/2021 08:45:16

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] 5 months too late (or 7 months too early) to be birthday cards. Meanwhile here's a list of the crew in 1915 . Most of them are from Cork - after the sinking the Irish Independent said "That city, needless to say, has many homes plunged into mourning by the tragedy, and many families deprived of their breadwinners"

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    kundun59

    • 27/Aug/2021 08:51:14

    SPECIAL AWARD ★★★★★ 5 stars for your photo... Seen in:..Flickr Hall of Fame Flickr Hall of Fame (Post 1 – Award 1)

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 27/Aug/2021 08:52:24

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner] Here is the Captain Henry Hore in the 1911 Census

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 27/Aug/2021 08:55:03

    Same from 1901

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 27/Aug/2021 09:11:51

    Here's the 1st engineer Robert West Beatson in 1911 (aged 65). He isn't on the barely legible list of victims of the sinking in the Irish Independent, but the carpenter Arthur Allridge is (when he would have been 72 or 73).

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    John Spooner

    • 27/Aug/2021 09:24:19

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland A shipping list in the Cork Examiner of Tuesday 30 August 1904 1st September 1903 shows Hore as the captain of the Inniscarra, arriving from and departing for Milford with general cargo. So he was captain for most of the ship's existence - 1904 1903 (or earlier) to 1915 (or later but before May 1918).

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 27/Aug/2021 11:26:21

    OCO 290 titled Boats moored along the quays on the River Lee, Cork City looks to be the stern of the Iniscarra, same day, if anyone fancies making a panorama.

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    John Spooner

    • 27/Aug/2021 12:13:24

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley]Rather rough and ready, in the words of Eric Morecambe, "You can see the join" left

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    Niall McAuley

    • 27/Aug/2021 12:59:09

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Nice!

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    Niall McAuley

    • 27/Aug/2021 13:03:07

    OCO 292 is the National Monument, completed in 1906 per the DIA.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 27/Aug/2021 15:14:48

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Well done John, virtual sticky bun in the post.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 27/Aug/2021 21:30:03

    Good work. I often wonder why we have not found more 'panoramas' of Irish views. It doesn't seem to have been the fashion with Mr French & Co.; dime a dozen in contemporary Sydney, Australia photos, almost a cliché. One of my favs is this four-frame vertical< pano of a tall ship - https://www.flickr.com/photos/anmm_thecommons/8491399118/in/album-72157629416093106/

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 28/Aug/2021 04:36:55

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia I had a look, very interesting.

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    John Spooner

    • 30/Aug/2021 09:30:16

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Thank you. I'll incorporate it into my virtual diet.