Why did the chickens cross the road?

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Where: Munster, Waterford, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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Main Street in Cappoquin grinding to a halt as the locals contemplate the ancient conundrum "why did the chicken cross the road"? The matter is further compounded by the abundance of chickens either in the process of or contemplating a similar adventure!

Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Circa 1865 - 1914 1907 - 1908

NLI Ref: L_ROY_10011

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 3666
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio thelawrencephotographcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland mainstreet cappoquin cowaterford horseandsidecar chickens crossingroad

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  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 31/Aug/2021 07:50:55

    To see the 2 (maybe 3) dogs in the backround!

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 31/Aug/2021 07:55:04

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Those are chickens

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    derangedlemur

    • 31/Aug/2021 07:56:58

    Taken from here, outside Moore's Hotel: goo.gl/maps/A3HHcviqEyCKg9UV6

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    suckindeesel

    • 31/Aug/2021 07:59:56

    On the 25" of 1904 arcg.is/199vDz

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 31/Aug/2021 08:06:16

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Great match on the Streetview

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 31/Aug/2021 08:13:02

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I was going to accuse you of another "Ballymoney" but those are two fine dogs - so you did well to "Spot" the dog:-)

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    John Spooner

    • 31/Aug/2021 08:27:43

    A Mr Collender was active in local politics c 1904, arguing for the provision of footpaths in Cappoquin. He said "there was a great danger of the children ... being run over, and perhaps killed by horses and cars going up an down". (Waterford Standard - Wednesday 20 January 1904) But no mention of chickens. I don't think he was talking about Main St, so not dating evidence.

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    suckindeesel

    • 31/Aug/2021 08:28:54

    I see a flat capped RIC officer lurking in the shadows of the contemporary shot further down Main St, same jarvey catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000317437

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    derangedlemur

    • 31/Aug/2021 08:29:05

    Ronayne and Collender are both there in 1901

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    Niall McAuley

    • 31/Aug/2021 08:29:20

    I see a sign Agency for Rudge Whitworth Cycles. The company was formed by a merger of Rudge and Whitworth in 1894 so we are after that date.

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    derangedlemur

    • 31/Aug/2021 08:33:52

    If Walsh is H.P. rather than M.P she's there too.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 31/Aug/2021 08:33:53

    The buildings are older - 1850-1880. The hotel: Renovated, c.1900, with wrought iron balcony added to first floor.

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    derangedlemur

    • 31/Aug/2021 08:34:50

    J. Morrissey also there running his pub, and Begley, across the road.

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    derangedlemur

    • 31/Aug/2021 08:35:56

    You couldn't rule out 1901 on the strength of the census, anyway.

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    CASSIDY PHOTOGRAPHY

    • 31/Aug/2021 08:46:29

    I see a line across the top of the photo. When was telephone, telegraph, or electricity introduced to Cappoquin?

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    Niall McAuley

    • 31/Aug/2021 08:56:16

    L_ROY_10012 next door in the catalogue is just up the road looking the same direction.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 31/Aug/2021 08:58:21

    L_ROY_10013 is a reverse view from the far side of the trees, in which I see an RIC man in a peaked cap - suggests after 1900.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 31/Aug/2021 09:00:50

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley We have come across Rudge-Whitworth Cycles a few times before. https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/10454387713

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    cargeofg

    • 31/Aug/2021 09:02:43

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Cycle shops then took on to selling motorcycles and motor spirit. No motorcycle or Pratt's signs present. So date range 1894-1903

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    Niall McAuley

    • 31/Aug/2021 09:04:55

    10012 linked above (surely the same day) has a Carburine Motor Spirit sign. First reference in Freemans is in 1914! Trove sees references in 1905.

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    cargeofg

    • 31/Aug/2021 09:10:54

    Stop Press In catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000317437 we have a Carburine Motor Spirit sign. So date range run on a few years to post 1904 in line with newspaper report

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    derangedlemur

    • 31/Aug/2021 09:15:00

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley It can't be much past 1904 - everyone I found in the census was ancient.

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    derangedlemur

    • 31/Aug/2021 09:18:57

    Mind you, having checked the 1911 census, they're all still there, many with ages suggesting either bad memory or pension fraud.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 31/Aug/2021 09:40:13

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Differences in the census ages between 1901 and 1911 seems to be an issue right across the country.

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    derangedlemur

    • 31/Aug/2021 09:46:31

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Morrissey, Begley and Walsh are there too, though M.F. Walsh rather than H.P., but that's also plausible, I think. The sign's not very legible.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 31/Aug/2021 10:00:54

    In both 1901 and 1911, James and then John Morrisey seem to be running a rather small establishment, 2nd class, 4 windows to the front. Morrisey's hotel as shown is much grander. I wonder if John took over between 1911 and 1914?

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    Niall McAuley

    • 31/Aug/2021 10:05:38

    No, the Waterford News has references to Morrisey's Hotel in 1905.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 31/Aug/2021 10:13:53

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] I think the Morrisey in the census is the one on the right, after Walsh. It's a public house/shop in the two censuses. Whereas Morrisey's Hotel is being run by Michael Kenny in 1901 and Michael Foley in 1911.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 31/Aug/2021 10:20:45

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet OK, if that is Morriseys, there is a youngish man in the doorway and a small girl sitting on the step, maybe 4 years old. John Morrisey is unmarried in 1901, and oldest daughter is 5 in 1911. I think we are nearer 1910 than 1901.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 31/Aug/2021 10:21:25

    💡Mr Poole snapped J. Walsh's Hotel plus family in August 1906 - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000591836 . Do the family members, particularly the lad with the Walsh's smart hat, look older in the similar-but-different Lawrence - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000317436 ? The bench has changed black / white too ... Which might imply that the three French / Lawrence photos are later than August 1906 ?

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 31/Aug/2021 10:29:07

    There are several Walsh generations evident in this other Poole photo of the back / front / back (!!) - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000591835

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    Niall McAuley

    • 31/Aug/2021 10:30:35

    I note that in 2019's Streetview, there are still Walshes in the shop on the right: Norman, auctioneer, and Aidan Walsh & Sons, Complete Funeral Furnishers.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 31/Aug/2021 10:39:15

    Catherine Walsh, hotel proprietor in Barrack Street is a widow in 1911. John Walsh is alive and 60 in 1901. I think John Walsh, Merchant, died in 1908

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    derangedlemur

    • 31/Aug/2021 11:24:48

    What used to have a logo like the current Ulster Bank? There's one down the street on the left, above a sign for tobacco.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 31/Aug/2021 11:50:57

    Via Trove, 'An Australian in Ireland' 1911, P. J. Sullivan - " ... The drive to Cappoquin was pleasant;, charming scenery all the way down the mountain, After emerging from a steep Valley thickly wooded on the left, the little town of "Cappo" on a bend of the Blackwater emerges into view. The journey occupied about half an hour. From Morrissey's Hotel, Cappoquin (the proprietor of which is a Mr. John Walsh [!!} ), cars run to Melleray twice daily, the fare being one shilling each way. This public car service is well managed. They also ply between the town of Cappoquin and the steamers on the "Irish Rhine"—the Blackwater River—and the railway station. ... " See - trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/170931207?searchTerm=c...

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    sharon.corbet

    • 31/Aug/2021 11:58:06

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] The September 16th 1988 issue of the Dungarvan Leader has some info on the history of Morrisey's Hotel. Including the fact that John Walsh bought it in 1902, and later bought the old RIC barracks and turned it into Walsh's hotel.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 31/Aug/2021 12:09:32

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet] L_CAB_05843 is a reverse view, but must be earlier, as you can see in the distance that Walsh's Hotel has not been stuccoed yet. Begley is TF Begley. There is a bay window in one of the shops opposite Morriseys. Thomas Begley, Publican, of Main Street died in 1897 son William from the 1901 census was present.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 31/Aug/2021 12:23:52

    So John Walsh bought Morriseys in 1902, later bought the building seen in Poole's 1906 shots (and stuccoed his name on it which remains in streetview), then painted the bench and had French take pictures, then died in 1908. Given that the Pooles are August 1906, I'd say the bench was painted earliest for the season in 1907, so 10012 is either 1907 or 1908. I can't be certain all three shots are the same day but 11 and 13 are the same day and 12 is sandwiched between them, so... I think this is 1907 or the first half of 1908.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 31/Aug/2021 12:34:21

    ... or, another possibility is that Poole's shots are later than this one, and the little porter with the big feet just looks older in his hat and uniform... But I think it is more likely that Walsh had Poole take the 1906 shots when the Hotel was finished, and that French was just passing through doing his postcard job of taking street shots of the town and sights later.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 31/Aug/2021 12:53:37

    Waterford County Museum has a copy of the coloured postcard version of 10013, but just says c1910.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 31/Aug/2021 12:59:16

    Collenders (now the Central Bar in streetview) was still there c.1960 per this shot at the same museum.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 31/Aug/2021 13:15:01

    Further evidence the 3 shots are the same day: in negative writing across the bottom of 10012 it says Main Street Cappoquin Co.Waterford No.3. 10013 looks like same thing No. 2 Can't really tell from todays crop, but it looks consistent with No. 1

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    suckindeesel

    • 31/Aug/2021 13:21:58

    10013 has 'Denny's Star Brand' advertised And a pound and a half of Denny’s sausages… James Joyce, Ulysses

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    sharon.corbet

    • 31/Aug/2021 15:24:04

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia The Blackwater is the "Irish Rhine"? I have to say, I don't really see too many similarities...

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    Bernard Healy

    • 31/Aug/2021 16:42:30

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] For sure! The Blackwater is more like the Danube! ;) BTW, if any of you photo detectives fancy an extracurricular challenge, here’s a puzzler on Instagram: www.instagram.com/p/CTM9aURN_ze/?utm_medium=copy_link

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    suckindeesel

    • 31/Aug/2021 17:23:14

    Don't see two hotels in the Main St. in the 1904 25", just Morriseys, no Walshe's. So, post 1904. Carburine had an agency in Pearse St. as early as 1905.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 31/Aug/2021 19:07:38

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] I don’t think that you can rely on the OSI to always show hotels. For example here, there were 2 hotels on Main St. in 1901 - Morrissey’s and Moore’s. You can see the sign for Moore’s on the upper part of the first building on the left. It was still a hotel in 1911, and the sign is still visible in the Streetview above. [https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy] Ah, yes, the Danube makes more sense…

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 01/Sep/2021 00:40:42

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy We have come across several contemporary references to the "Irish Rhine". The first I remember was here, with reference to "Penelope's Irish Experiences" 1901, by Kate Douglas Wiggin; a perfect pot pourri of purple prose! - https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/9454984499/

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    derangedlemur

    • 01/Sep/2021 05:57:38

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy re your link - might be Gormanstown college but I can't get a picture to confirm it.

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    Bernard Healy

    • 01/Sep/2021 09:33:42

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ I’ve shared that suggestion, but it seems unlikely.