Let's get to the Point

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Where: Leinster, Louth, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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The catalogue tells us that this is the Strand Hotel, Omeath, Co. Louth (without much evidence supporting the Hotel portion). The one thing for sure is that there is a lot of beer for sale on both sides of the road. The sign post is interesting with the old gaelic type. It is a great shame that the newspaper headlines beside the door on the left is not in focus, dating this photo may be difficult.

Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Circa 1865 - 1914

NLI Ref: L_ROY_10177

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 2367
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio thelawrencephotographcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland omeath colouth louth leinster beer barrels pub hotel bass basss guinness jameson jamesons he

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  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 03/Sep/2021 07:29:02

    It hasn't changed much. The town is still just a big pile of pubs: goo.gl/maps/2nPMfRq2nufPEoc3A

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    derangedlemur

    • 03/Sep/2021 07:29:50

    They presumably get a fair bit of business off the Tain Way from people who can't schlepp all the way from Ravensdale to Carlingford in one go.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 03/Sep/2021 07:30:17

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/8[email protected] Almost the same!

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    derangedlemur

    • 03/Sep/2021 07:52:14

    And sure everyone loves a bit of OSI: arcg.is/0K1HCG0 Edit: Is there some way to get the arcgis app to link directly to the historic layer?

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    derangedlemur

    • 03/Sep/2021 08:01:22

    According to the map, the Strand Hotel is some way out of shot on the right. goo.gl/maps/SD14fEjmiiiUdyGMA

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    derangedlemur

    • 03/Sep/2021 08:04:22

    It must be reasonably close to 1901 at the earliest, judging by the census: Howe William H Knocknagoran Drummullagh Louth 34 M Co Louth Spirit Merchant How young would he have got his name up on the wall?

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    Niall McAuley

    • 03/Sep/2021 08:06:25

    I think the poster at the door is for the Newry Telegraph. No help with dates, some crew called the NLI say it was published until 1970.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 03/Sep/2021 08:07:12

    Here is the real Strand Hotel, guarded by a tiny cannon - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000321187

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    Niall McAuley

    • 03/Sep/2021 08:14:18

    The NIAH lets us down today.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 03/Sep/2021 08:23:34

    The Strand hotel is, unsurprisingly, some way out of shot to the right, down at the strand.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 03/Sep/2021 08:46:22

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Sort of. Test. Having double-checked that worked, my method is to add the layer I want on the left side as a layer, rather than as the base map, then under the sharing tab clink "link options" and activate "Remember layers visibility", go back and copy the sharing link. There is probably an easier way somehow, but this one works.

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    derangedlemur

    • 03/Sep/2021 08:55:06

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet Brilliant! Thanks. (I had tried toggling that but it did nothing, evidently because I was using the 25" as a base layer.)

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 03/Sep/2021 08:57:00

    What was with all the wonderful whitewashed walls in Omeath ?

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    derangedlemur

    • 03/Sep/2021 09:38:03

    www.duchas.ie/en/src?q=Castletown&t=CbesTranscript&am... "All the people who spoke Irish called Dundalk Sraid Baile which is a corruption of Trage Baile"

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    Niall McAuley

    • 03/Sep/2021 09:39:18

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Per William's wedding record from 1899, his father was John Howe, an RIC sergeant, so the name on the wall is indeed his, not his fathers. John died aged 70 in 1896, listed as RIC Pensioner, but might have been running this bar...

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    derangedlemur

    • 03/Sep/2021 09:57:26

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Presumably he used to work next door, so not much of a change in his commute.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 03/Sep/2021 10:05:16

    Nearby is L_ROY_10178 showing the house with dormers further along the street is a shop/pub/restaurant belonging to a H. McElwee, Grocer No sign in the 1901 or 1911 census of a H McElwee in Omeath, but irishgeneology gives me the birth of Mary McElwee in Dundalk in 1895. Mother Elizabeth née Duggan, father H Hugh, a constable in the RIC. In 1901, I think this is mother Lizzie, with children Mary, Hugh and Tom in Dysart, Louth. I do not see Lizzie/Elizabeth, Mary, Hugh or Tom/Thomas in 1911.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 03/Sep/2021 10:19:50

    I also don't see Hugh snr in 1901 or 1911, but he may just be initials in a barracks somewhere.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 03/Sep/2021 10:26:17

    In 1901, the RIC sergeant in Omeath was James Beggs, total persons was 2, can't see the other name.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 03/Sep/2021 10:32:16

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] Here are the McElwee family outside their shop - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000336973 Edit - also - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000041993

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 03/Sep/2021 10:40:51

    This photo of the church; the nearest gravestone mentions a son James Major who died in SIngapore in March 1891. Which might provide an earliest date for the Omeath series - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000321186

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    Niall McAuley

    • 03/Sep/2021 10:49:16

    marriage of Hugh and Lizzie in 1893, he was an RIC man in Monaghan, aged 30. Using that age, if his death is recorded, this is him at Rathmullan in Donegal in 1933 aged 72, retired RIC man.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 03/Sep/2021 11:03:41

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia If that is Lizzie McElwee and her children, the oldest looks to be a teenager, maybe 15, so we are at 1908 or so?

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    Niall McAuley

    • 03/Sep/2021 11:05:12

    Birth of Hugh, Thomas

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    Niall McAuley

    • 03/Sep/2021 11:16:29

    If the two boys in the photos are Hugh and Tom, 1908 ish looks reasonable. So what's the story? Hugh McElwee is an RIC man, in Dundalk in 1895, family are in Dysart in 1901. Then he is posted to Omeath, and he and Lizzie open a shop near the barracks. Photos around 1908. He's 30 in 1893, so in 1908 he is 45, and soon after he quits the RIC and they all emigrate before the 1911 census?

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    suckindeesel

    • 03/Sep/2021 12:21:04

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Probably a lime based render. A traditional render used on poor stone or porous brick walls. Allows the wall to 'breathe' as the lime is porous. Want to mx your own? 1 part lime : 2.5 parts sand

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    sharon.corbet

    • 03/Sep/2021 12:31:00

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley They're in Birmingham in 1911. Looking at RIC records, Hugh started getting his pension in June 1907 in Dundalk, then it seems to say Inland Rev/Sheffield from January 1908 and Birmingham from August 1908. (The Sheffield bit is a bit unclear as to what they mean). He was originally from Donegal, and was stationed in Monaghan from August 1891, Louth from January 1894 and Antrim from 1906. (The records I'm looking at don't get more specific than the county.)

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    Niall McAuley

    • 03/Sep/2021 13:44:46

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet So I am a few years too late with 1908, but I think after 1901 when Lizzie was in Dysart and before they emigrate still seems reasonable?

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    John Spooner

    • 03/Sep/2021 15:03:54

    In April 1960 bookings for Easter at the Strand Hotel could be made by telephone. The hotel's number: Omeath 7.

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    suckindeesel

    • 03/Sep/2021 16:38:27

    Although Omeath looks very isolated in these photos it had its own railway station served by the Dundalk, Newry and Greenore Railway, with services to Newry and Dundalk

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    John Spooner

    • 04/Sep/2021 07:26:27

    I used the phrase 'bona fide traveller' in a comment under the yesterday's O'Connell bridge/street/statue photo. Imagine how delighted I was to discover that in 1910 James Fox, proprietor of the Strand Hotel, Omeath was prosecuted for serving a local man on a Sunday. Constable M'Quirk had "entered the bar room of the hotel and found a man called Owen M'Court, a stone mason, there, who lived about two miles from the hotel, along with a number of bonafide travellers." After lengthy cross examination of Mrs Fox, mainly concerning the precautions to prevent locals from entering the hotel on a Sunday including a man called Small who was supposed to 'look after' the door, James Fox was found guilty. He was fined 10s and 8s costs. M'Court was fined 10s and 4s 6d costs. (reported in Newry Reporter - Saturday 23 July 1910) Adverts for the Strand Hotel at the time stressed that it was under new management. Perhaps the Foxes hadn't had time to get to know their local clientele. It occurs to me that if it had been not the hotel proprietor but the constable who was called Fox, it would have raised a whole range of implications, and It would be nearly an insoluble pancake, a conundrum of inscrutable potentialities, a snorter.

    “Who is Fox?", I asked. "Policeman Fox is the third of us," said the Sergeant, "but we never see him or hear tell of him at because he is always on his beat and never off it and he signs the book in the middle of the night when even a badger is asleep. He is as mad as a hare, he never interrogates the public and he is always taking notes.”
    [see the comments on this Bonafide Travellers photo for more discussion of bona fide travellers and the licensing laws]

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 04/Sep/2021 13:00:21

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Excellent.