Oh to be in Ventry when it's summer there

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Where: Munster, Co Kerry, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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From the tragic death of a young man with no name in 1916 to the beauty of Ventry in County Kerry from on high. The village was tiny back in 1955 and no doubt with all that has happened in the intervening years it is much changed now?

Photographer: Alexander Campbell “Monkey” Morgan

Collection: Morgan Aerial Photographic Collection

Date: ca. June 1955

NLI Ref: NPA MOR1246

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 3722
morganaerialphotographiccollection nationallibraryofireland ireland bw alexandercampbellmorgan captainacmorgan monkeymorgan piperapache eiajl westonaerodrome phaseboxes mylar aerial ventry village coastline cokerry munster

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  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 08/Nov/2021 08:14:36

    It appears that a pier has appeared - Google maps satellite 3D - www.google.com/maps/@52.1286347,-10.3599568,260a,35y,359.... [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia/51664387855/in/dateposted/]

  • profile

    Insher

    • 08/Nov/2021 08:15:46

    Vista su - Seen in: Flickr Global Vai a Flickr Global

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 08/Nov/2021 08:49:49

    Seconds before (going by the man with the bike) - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000734058/HierarchyTree?hiera... Both cars Ford Prefects? (by the flat rear) - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Prefect#E93A_(1938%E2%80%9349)

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 08/Nov/2021 09:14:41

    I see a Dog (or two)

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 08/Nov/2021 09:35:14

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia The pier was opened (or more accurately, blessed) in November 1995. According to the report in The Kerryman, the pier is 150 ft long, 50ft wide, and the depth of water is 15 ft at high tide. The previous 35-year-old slip could only be used by naomhogs and small boats.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 08/Nov/2021 10:06:41

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner] The Kerry Naomhog (I see three of them in the photo) "Naomhóg" is the name given to the type of currach which is used by coastal communities in Cork and Kerry. Currachs differ from each other from region to region. Naomhógs are slightly longer than the currachs used in the West of Ireland. Some people believe that currachs first came to the Dingle Peninsula in the early 19th century. They say that this type of boat was introduced from Clare, where currachs are known as "canoes". From: www.askaboutireland.ie/

  • profile

    cargeofg

    • 08/Nov/2021 14:37:43

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland I have amended my photo note.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 08/Nov/2021 16:10:26

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I noticed that!!

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 08/Nov/2021 17:14:51

    My old stomping ground! I was the curate responsible for Ventry between 2008 & 2012. The village has grown since the photo was taken, but most of what is present in the photo is still intact. The school building dates from the early 20th century. A Catholic chapel used to stand there, but in the 1870s - 1874 if I remember correctly - the parish priest of the time had a new chapel built at Ard a Bhothair, a couple of kilometres to the west. Paidí Ó Sé's pub is also located at Ard a Bhothair. Across from the school is Long's Post Office. There is an interesting history/memoir about Ventry written by the late postmaster Bernie Long entitled Ventry Calling. The original book 'as Gaeilge' was called Ceann Trá hAon (the phone number of the PO), and the translation was made by Gabriel Fitzmaurice. Ventry was a hotly contested area during the 19th century arising out of the efforts of Evangelical Protestants to convert the local Catholics. Some of the houses on the main road are known as "The Colony" because they were built to accomodate locals who had converted to Protestantism. There used to be a Church of Ireland Church slightly to the East of area shown in the photograph. Whether these houses are best considered an inducement to convert or an act of charity towards those who found themselves in hardship because of their decision to change religion is a question for the historian to answer. The term "souper" arose in the context of the religious struggles in Ventry and surrounding areas. Finally there is a row of four two-storey houses in the village. I understand that these were built as a college to train Protestant clergy and school-teachers how to speak Irish in order that they might work more effectively in Irish-speaking areas.

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    suckindeesel

    • 08/Nov/2021 18:15:42

    It doesn't appear to have grown much at all, when comparing no Monkey's shot and the GoogleEarth view. Population appears to be falling, according to census: 1841: 2426 1851: 1338 2011: 423

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 08/Nov/2021 20:14:07

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy Thanks Bernard, I am sure that brought back some memories!

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 08/Nov/2021 23:19:43

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/22737564701/in/photolist-o1mAkj-ADeXPB The time U-35 paid a visit to Ventry

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 09/Nov/2021 00:32:37

    buenas fotos aéreas antiguas

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 09/Nov/2021 06:13:57

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] ;-)

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 09/Nov/2021 08:11:50

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] ¡Olé!

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 09/Nov/2021 13:53:37

    Some more information from Bernie Long’s book, Ventry Calling. The terrace of four houses was indeed part of Rev Thomas Moriarty’s short-lived as college established in the 1840s to teach Protestant clergymen Irish. Moriarty was a native of West Kerry and a fluent Irish speaker. He was known as “Tom of the Lies” in those less-than-ecumenical days.

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 09/Nov/2021 13:59:39

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ The rightmost terraced house was a pub - known locally as Joanie’s. The family owning it were Flahertys. It’s now Quinn’s Public House. To the left of the pub was O’Conchuir’s sweet shop. This explains the hut visible in the garden. According to Long it was “a corrugated iron structure added on to the front of the dwelling house with a big yellow AA sign announcing that it was 196 miles to Dublin!”

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 10/Nov/2021 06:32:50

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] good find re U-35 https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy I like the sweet shop story.

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    cargeofg

    • 11/Nov/2021 08:37:37

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy] I did wonder if it was a motoring or a Dunlop sign www.flickr.com/photos/kitmasterbloke/14896293376/in/photo...

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 11/Nov/2021 08:56:15

    There is still one extant in Lispole, just a few miles from Ventry: goo.gl/maps/vqs2C41DXMcPEZX9A

  • profile

    Dr. Ilia

    • 11/Nov/2021 09:00:23

    fantastic