Clondalkin with tassels on top!

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Where: Leinster, South Dublin, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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A visit to the Eason Collection today and a trip out the road to Clondalkin in a time long gone. The round tower dwarfs the chimney stack behind it while children are out and about with their guardians. The boy nearest the camera appears to be wearing a sailor suit and a bowler hat while the ladies clothing is a sombre black. To this eye it seems much earlier than the 1900 of the date range set out below?

Photographer: Unknown

Collection: Eason Photographic Collection

Date: between 1900-1939

NLI Ref: Eas 1661

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 3529
eason easonson easoncollection easonphotographiccollection glassnegative 20thcentury nationallibraryofireland clondalkin codublin leinster roundtower factory chimneystack

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 11/Nov/2021 08:32:25

    Mr French / Lawrence was there first - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000325589 Then Mr Welch - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000230208 Then "Mr Eason". See the growth in the trees.

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    cargeofg

    • 11/Nov/2021 08:42:20

    A lot of skyscraping has been done as is evident when you look at the water tower and roof line below.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 11/Nov/2021 08:49:53

    Golly, it has been a popular view for ages ... Edit - In 1767 by Gabriel Beranger - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000053624 In 1834 via [https://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/] [Edit - same as 1832 George Petrie - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000736098 ][https://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/11010983883/] And in the 1830s(?) by W. H. Bartlett, via [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/5501349847/]

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    Niall McAuley

    • 11/Nov/2021 09:11:09

    Streetview. The fashions say early in that 1900-1939 date range.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 11/Nov/2021 09:16:45

    In the distance in megazoom I see P. Furlong, Grocer. The 1911 census records Rosanna and daughter Kathleen, 71 and 47. In 1901, niece Jane Furlong is with them.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 11/Nov/2021 09:18:30

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Streetview is good fun too. Eight different times over the last 12 years. A monkey puzzle tree on the left of the tower disappeared after 2014.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 11/Nov/2021 09:21:52

    Philip Furlong, Grocer of Clondalkin, died in 1885. They left that sign up a long time. Hmm, son Michael was present. I wonder where he went.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 11/Nov/2021 09:28:30

    Michael Edward Furlong died in 1895 at 35, unmarried. His cousin Michael Edward Furlong was present!

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 11/Nov/2021 09:45:19

    "10 things you probably didn't know about the Clondalkin round tower" - www.echo.ie/here-s-10-things-you-probably-didn-t-know-abo...

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    Niall McAuley

    • 11/Nov/2021 09:51:48

    Chimney and tank are part of Clondalkin Paper Mills.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 11/Nov/2021 09:57:51

    Mills with the Round Tower in the background in this (later) Monkey Morgan shot.

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    suckindeesel

    • 11/Nov/2021 10:09:43

    Monkey view Google Earth Link earth.app.goo.gl/LPehd2 #googleearth

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    Billy Quinn 1954

    • 11/Nov/2021 10:21:49

    Clondalkin

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    Billy Quinn 1954

    • 11/Nov/2021 10:22:16

    I used to climb up it as a child (or frogling), before helicopter parenting was a thing. In your photograph there is also a factory chimney behind it. I think that must be 'Clondalkin Paper Mills', the site of my first ever job. The mill, as mentioned by Mr. McAuley, was fed by the Camac River.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 11/Nov/2021 12:16:39

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/mutter_fluffer https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia What is that at the top of the tower? Vegetation? A nest?

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    Foxglove

    • 11/Nov/2021 12:30:06

    and yes, there is a resting DOG ...

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    Billy Quinn 1954

    • 11/Nov/2021 12:39:19

    Do you mean actually inside the tower, or those tassels? I know the inside of the tower, or knew it almost 60 years ago. The tassels were not there when I was up it. It looks like it might be bird's nests or the like, or just moss from neglect, though it could be both. The inside of the top of the tower was pretty derelict , in the early sixties when I was up it. The window(s) was/were broken, I cannot really remember how many there were, probably one in each direction, it being a watch-out tower. I could see my school from it, 3 miles away.

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    Billy Quinn 1954

    • 11/Nov/2021 12:42:30

    I would guess bird's nests.

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    Billy Quinn 1954

    • 11/Nov/2021 12:44:37

    I do think that the photo was manipulated in a printer's studio, like some early 20th century photoshop. There seems to be some rather charming and crude manipulation around the tower's cap, the sky seems to have been whitened too. If you look at around the trees, there also appears to be a type of 'dodging', an old printing trick we used to use. The shaft of the tower itself looks 'cut-in' too. I suggest we are looking at late 19th century photoshop, even.

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    Billy Quinn 1954

    • 11/Nov/2021 12:49:37

    I just checked the image again. Take a look at the chimney behind on the original image, or more particularly the scaffolding to the right of it. There you can clearly see the whitening of the sky.

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    Billy Quinn 1954

    • 11/Nov/2021 12:55:07

    That Leaning Tower of Hubris, even

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    Billy Quinn 1954

    • 11/Nov/2021 13:11:10

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley I also, strangely, knew the Furlongs in Clondalkin. I can tell you that they moved down the Naas Road and lived near 'The Red Cow'. One Peter Furlong would probably be a direct descendant, born around 1952.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 11/Nov/2021 13:53:25

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/mutter_fluffer It is common in many photos in the archive that the sky has been removed from the image. This is a 16cm x 12cm glass plate negative, so I think the Photoshopping would consist of painting over the sky in black. As you say, the difference between the blacked out sky and the actual grey sky is visible at that water tower near the chimney.

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    Billy Quinn 1954

    • 11/Nov/2021 13:59:24

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Yes, you are right, it didn't look particularly like dodging, that practice of using a stick with some cardboard on it to stop some of the light getting through to different parts of the print, whilst exposing it. That would be later technology.

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    suckindeesel

    • 11/Nov/2021 14:07:36

    Yes, the chimney must have been part of the paper mills, itsin the right spot as shown in Monkey's shot. A little history from askaboutireland.com, though it doesn't help with dating. "There were also paper mills located in Clondalkin village. They were established in the early 19th century by Thomas Seery and Son on a site beside the Camac River leased to them by William Caldbeck. The clean, fresh water of the Camac was ideal for paper making and the mill thrived. It changed hands many times over the years and in 1913 it was bought by the Becker Company who owned paper mills all over the world. Business boomed during the First World War as all British mills had switched to war production. However, after the war, the market went downhill and the mill closed in 1922. In 1936, however, it re-opened under the name 'Condalkin Paper Mill'. Business was good until general economic circumstances lead to its final closure in 1987."

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    suckindeesel

    • 11/Nov/2021 17:26:58

    The 25" of 1910 arcg.is/y5iKy0

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    KenjiB_48

    • 11/Nov/2021 17:32:58

    The youngish lady in the distance seems to be in shirtwaist and skirt, with an Edwardian era hairstyle...

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    suckindeesel

    • 11/Nov/2021 18:11:23

    From Wikipedia "The most unusual feature of this tower is the very pronounced buttress at the base which is constructed with a different type of stone to the tower. The series of steps was believed to be added to the buttress in the late 19th century. The bulging base is rubblework with smaller stones. The doorway, 3.9 m (13 ft) above pavement level, faces east toward St. John's Church. The very plain lintelled doorway is composed mainly of granite. There are four square-headed windows in the top storey facing the cardinal compass points. Two other windows in the drum face south (in the first storey) and west (in the second storey). Both are also square-headed."