Outside on the Southside of Dublin

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Where: Leinster, Dublin City, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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What a lovely photo of Strand Road, Sandymount. We get a great view of the tram and the lady in white who seems to be having a job holding on to her hat, I thought they had hat pins back then? The pram (buggy) on the left looks very modern and not unlike the models on sale today.

Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: between 1890-1910

NLI Ref: L_ROY_10955

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 5818
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio thelawrencephotographcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland strandroad sandymount tram horse cart tracks her is horan vicua

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  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 18/Jan/2022 09:19:49

    Streetview

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    Niall McAuley

    • 18/Jan/2022 09:25:15

    Tram opened and electrified in March 1901.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 18/Jan/2022 09:29:15

    Patrick Fleming of Sandymount Green: Sandymount Road looking towards Sandymount Green!

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    Niall McAuley

    • 18/Jan/2022 09:46:00

    Other cart is Horan Victuallers, here is a Michael Horan, butcher.

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    suckindeesel

    • 18/Jan/2022 09:47:11

    "The Merrion Promenade Pier and Baths Co built Sandymount swimming baths in 1883. The baths measured approximately 40 by 40 metres, with a 75-metre pier added in 1884. The pier featured a bandstand halfway along it and summer concerts were regularly held there for many years. By 1920, the pier had deteriorated so much that it had to be demolished. The concrete baths section, which resembles a small harbour, remains." per Wiki The Martello was used as a tram office at this time.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 18/Jan/2022 09:53:35

    Next door in the catalogue is L_ROY_10956, same tram 196 at the Martello Tower.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 18/Jan/2022 10:41:17

    There is a series of shots near Sandymount, and then a couple of the Parnell Monument, like L_ROY_10968, which was unveiled in October 1911 (by John Redmond), then a shot of the 1906 Boer War memorial in Armagh. L_ROY_10970 is 1912-14! ...and just before this sequence, I think L_ROY_10954 has postcards of King George 5th in a shop window in Irishtown, so after May 1910.

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    John Spooner

    • 18/Jan/2022 10:57:55

    "Nelson's Pillar to Fleming's Door". The licensee of Fleming's was P. S. Fleming (or it was in 1920 when he transferred the licence) so I assume it's the same as the P. S. Fleming with the "high-class Grocery and Provision Business" (1911 advert & census)) Evening Herald (Dublin) - Saturday 03 August 1895 (Evening Herald (Dublin) - Saturday 03 August 1895)

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    John Spooner

    • 18/Jan/2022 11:34:16

    In 1913 Patrick Fleming applied for a 7-day licence, no doubt to provide refreshments to bonafide Sunday travellers from other parts of Dublin taking advantage of the tram service. Bonafide travellers advert on tram (to Blackrock in this case) near the other end of the line Bonafide Travellers

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 18/Jan/2022 11:40:55

    Flickr is sometimes amazing. Circa 1950 via https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/4879333048/

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    Foxglove

    • 18/Jan/2022 13:17:25

    in Glasgow at this period, ladies were discouraged ( ie; not allowed!) from using the upper deck ..... seen as unbecoming if people saw more than an ankle ;-) . 40 years ago on my first bus trip in Dundee I saw not only a No Smoking sign but a No Spitting.

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    suckindeesel

    • 18/Jan/2022 13:47:02

    The panels surrounding the upper deck were referred to as 'modesty panels' even into bus building days. There was also a screen behind the driver preventing any peeking up the stairs.

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    suckindeesel

    • 18/Jan/2022 13:55:01

    https://flic.kr/p/2mXWBEq Note the crescent route symbol on the tram. This one is for Sandymount, later becoming the No.3 route. These symbols were in use between 1903 and 1918, until replaced by numbers. One theory suggests that their use was due to the high level of illiteracy at the time. No. 196 was an earlier horse drawn Milne trailer car, No.21, converted to electric in 1899. The Martello was terminus of this route and used as an office.

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    suckindeesel

    • 18/Jan/2022 14:09:21

    "Am I walking into eternity along Sandymount strand?" -Stephen Dedalus

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    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 18/Jan/2022 16:25:07

    Looking back over the photographer's shoulder in Streetview, we have two surviving (upcycled) Tram Poles . goo.gl/maps/M8afEyF7up5q4dQbA

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 18/Jan/2022 17:40:28

    Good spot re the poles. There are other remnants nearby: the old tramsheds and a short piece of tramtrack across the footpath in Gilford Rd, just down the road on the right.

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    John Spooner

    • 18/Jan/2022 18:16:15

    As per the 1895 advert for Fleming's, the fare from Nelson's Pillar to Sandymount was 2d. It was still 2d until 1920 when it increased to 3d, much to the outrage of the Dublin press - after all, it was a 50% increase.

  • profile

    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 18/Jan/2022 20:28:08

    The sequence of Sandymount photos all (except one) include a prominent tram. I wonder if it was a commission for the tramway company? Most photos seem to be carefully posed, as if for an advert. And none have the customary title script for a postcard. There are a couple of copies of this image in the "Dublin Trams Collection", with horse apples less noticeable (see how they have been edited) - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000747370 catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000747372 The sequence - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000041161 - this photo catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000316275 - the tower catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000316276 - reverse-ish view with moving tram catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000316277 - no tram, St John's church. (compare with earlier STP - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000564048 ) catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000316278 - ladies waiting for tram catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000316279 - the Green catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000040950 - tram without crescent signs, No. 49 catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000316280 - unavailable catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000041052 - Irishtown Road It looks like Mr French had a Grand Day Out on the Sandymount tramway; the wind in his hair on the top deck, the fresh sea air, a spot of beachcombing perhaps ... ... wish I was there!

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    suckindeesel

    • 18/Jan/2022 21:51:05

    That 2d of 1885 would equal about €1.40 today. I think a 1d 'workmans' fare was later introduced between certain hours.

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    suckindeesel

    • 18/Jan/2022 22:07:28

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia It does look idyllic back then, but the reality may have been different. The Strand itself is something else. It featured in several episodes of Ulysses, one of which led to its banning in the US for obscenity. As Stephen Dedalus muses “Am I walking into eternity along Sandymount strand?” At low tide it appears to go out nearly to the horizon. The incoming tide has caught many people out over the years.

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    Dr. Ilia

    • 25/Jan/2022 09:00:22

    Amazing capture!