Boaters and ghosts in Newtownbarry/Bunclody

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Where: Leinster, County Wexford, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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Mr. French's images from Newtownbarry/Bunclody are some of the most atmospheric in the entire Lawrence Collection and this is no exception. The Carrigduff Road showing the entrance to some big building, a row of houses and a number of people, no dogs has that same warm, summery feeling similar to those that went before. The plants growing on the window boxes are strangely reminiscent of the briars in the windows of those homes resisting eviction in earlier times!

Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Circa 1865 - 1914

NLI Ref: L_ROY_10702

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 5804
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio thelawrencephotographcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland newtownbarry bunclody cowexford leinster royalplate

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  • profile

    Foxglove

    • 20/Jan/2022 08:57:12

    there is a ghost dog :-) by the second bollard

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    Rory_Sherlock

    • 20/Jan/2022 08:59:31

    Streetview: www.google.ie/maps/@52.6557553,-6.6557373,3a,75y,296.56h,... Surprising that the roof on the gatelodge was changed from half-hipped to gabled

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 20/Jan/2022 09:18:07

    Google Maps is telling me that this is actually in Co. Carlow. The border is the river Clody behind the camera.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Jan/2022 09:28:34

    The NIAH is not aware of the reroofing.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Jan/2022 09:29:31

    Hat fashion says ~1910 to me.

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    suckindeesel

    • 20/Jan/2022 09:47:40

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] Yes, Co.Carlow beyond the river, more clearly shown in the 6" colour. The.gate lodge on right doesn't actually appear to lead directly to Newtownbarry House. On the 25" of 1904/06 arcg.is/1DzeOC1

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    derangedlemur

    • 20/Jan/2022 09:55:17

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Reroofing says 1920 on it in streetview - the date stone is too high up to be before the reroofing.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Jan/2022 10:21:28

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Good spot on the 1920 date.

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    John Spooner

    • 20/Jan/2022 13:52:23

    I have no contribution to make regarding this photo itself, but in scanning the press to see what was going on in Bunclody at the beginning of the 20th century I came across a report of a bazaar and jumble sale which demanded further investigation. The event was held "for the purpose of raising funds to defray expenses incurred in the working of the sphagnum moss sub depot, Bunclody, which consists of several young ladies from the town and district" (Wicklow People - Saturday 17 March 1917). I had a vague idea of what sphagnum moss is and that it has wonderful properties, but why would it have a sub-depot which required funds? The answer came from the History Ireland website:

    One of the largest voluntary efforts within the Irish War Hospital Supply Organisation was the collection and production of surgical dressings made from sphagnum moss, a fibre that could compensate for the increasing shortage in cotton surgical dressings. Utilising sphagnum moss as a cheap and locally available wound dressing was not new; it had been employed in popular medicine since the Middle Ages, but the first scientific experiments into its absorbent qualities were carried out by German surgeons in the 1880s. In 1895 sphagnum dressings were adopted by the French war department but it was the First World War that stimulated a large-scale production in the British Empire.
    and
    The women and children collecting moss locally were given a printed leaflet with detailed instructions on what moss to look out for, and how to clean it and dry it. Bandages themselves (sterilised upon request) were then produced in the central depot in Dublin. No moss that was collected was wasted. Three varieties of bandages were made according to its grade. The finest moss, which was thicker and most absorbent, was used to make surgical pads. The next grade, which was thinner and somewhat less absorbent, was used for dysentery pads. Lastly, the poorest grade, which was thin and hence the least absorbent, was used for limb pillows, stretcher cushions and the like.
    More at History Ireland - Sphagnum moss and female agency So on behalf of my great-uncles (especially Uncle Harry of the 51st Highland Division, who was wounded back to Blighty three times and went back to France three times), a big Thank-You to the young ladies of Bunclody.

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    John Spooner

    • 20/Jan/2022 13:59:55

    PS [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] already told us about sphagnum moss 6 years ago War Hospital supply, committee group.

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 20/Jan/2022 19:51:33

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner] Wikipedia on sphagnum is much improved in the last six years - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sphagnum (includes a photo of Canadian ladies sorting sphagnum in c. 1914). Interesting how old remedies come back into use; honey, seaweed, etc.

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    rsb62rsb

    • 20/Jan/2022 19:54:05

    😮 the ghostly pooch!

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    suckindeesel

    • 20/Jan/2022 21:27:59

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Natural is best

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    suckindeesel

    • 20/Jan/2022 21:29:14

    "Oh, were I at the Moss house Where the birds do increase At the foot of Mount Leinster Or some silent place By the streams of Bunclody Where all pleasures do meet And all I would ask is One kiss from you sweet" ANON

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    suckindeesel

    • 20/Jan/2022 21:49:43

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ NIAH missed roof alterations and date plaque as were covered in creeper at time of survey Lodge walls were rendered but now bare stone

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    Dr. Ilia

    • 21/Jan/2022 09:00:28

    nicely framed

  • profile

    menchious

    • 04/Feb/2022 13:39:33

    I think you could be a bit more accurate than 'circa 1865-1914'. It's certainly nearer to 1914c than 1865.