Rooms with a view and old ghosts...

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Where: Leinster, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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A very interesting image from the lens of Mr. French today, the Metropole Hotel on the corner of Sackville (O'Connell) Street and Princes Street. Just one person seems to have stood still while the plate was exposed while many "ghosts" are seen moving into Princes Street. I imagine that it would have been such an addition to the life and activities of the modern O'Connell Stree?

Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Circa 1865 - 1914

NLI Ref: L_ROY_04818

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 6663
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio thelawrencephotographcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland themetropolehotel sackvillestreet oconnellstreet princesstreet thegpo generalpostoffice freemansjournal dublincity leinster frillyitus

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  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 25/Jan/2022 08:52:39

    Didn't do so well out of the rising: catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000721928

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 25/Jan/2022 09:07:59

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ might remember when those extremely tall electric lamp posts first appeared ...

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    derangedlemur

    • 25/Jan/2022 09:11:38

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] 1892: www.archiseek.com/discussion/topic/dublin-street-lighting/

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    derangedlemur

    • 25/Jan/2022 09:14:32

    There's what looks like a chap on a penny-farthing over on the right, but closer inspection reveals it to (disappointingly) be half a cart.

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 25/Jan/2022 09:17:01

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Thanks! Mr French kindly provides another angle with a fabric awning, different shops, etc - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000333856 Earlier or later?

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 25/Jan/2022 09:35:34

    Flickr is sometimes amazing! The view from one of the top round windows during the 1916 Rising, via https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/49484338323/

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    suckindeesel

    • 25/Jan/2022 09:45:38

    Right next door is Easons advertising department, CENTRAL DEPOT FOR NEWSPAPERS AND ADVERTISING CENTRAL LIBRARY RAILWAY ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT EASON & SON. W.H. SMITH & SON At some point, Eason who was W.H. Smith’s shop manager, took over. When?

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 25/Jan/2022 09:50:48

    1893 + en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hotel_Metropole,_Dublin "...Originally four Georgian buildings, they were combined to form a hotel by architect William M. Mitchell in 1891–93." More at - www.archiseek.com/2012/hotel-metropole-oconnell-st-dublin/

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    suckindeesel

    • 25/Jan/2022 09:51:27

    The street appears to be paved with what looks like wooden setts, My grandfather worked for the Corpo and would bring old ones home for the fire when the streets were repaved,

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    Myrtle26

    • 25/Jan/2022 09:54:06

    Beautiful photo which is possibly from 1903 or later. There is still a Metropole Hotel in Cork and a Metropole Cinema used to be in Dublin, possibly at this building location.

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 25/Jan/2022 09:58:06

    Ouch! In 1899 via Trove - trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/163689163

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    suckindeesel

    • 25/Jan/2022 10:05:20

    Further along to the left we George Lynch at no 43. Camp equipage and portmanteau manufacturer

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    rpgvlwqt88

    • 25/Jan/2022 10:27:02

    From a slightly different angle repository.dri.ie/catalog/rr171z15x

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    O Mac

    • 25/Jan/2022 10:28:37

    There are no overhead tram wires so photograph is pre 1898.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 25/Jan/2022 10:30:35

    Before tram electrification, 1901. Update: Pillar to Blackrock was electrified 12 July 1898, before that date.

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    suckindeesel

    • 25/Jan/2022 10:38:41

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Yes, same spot, now a Penneys Dept Store

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    suckindeesel

    • 25/Jan/2022 10:42:43

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Some lines from the Pillar were electrified as early as July 1898

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    Niall McAuley

    • 25/Jan/2022 10:45:01

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia L_CAB_06145 is earlier, there is still a gaslamp on the corner alongside the tall electric lamp. The tall electric lights are from 1892.

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    John Spooner

    • 25/Jan/2022 10:59:10

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia His mistake was referring to the device as an 'elevator'. Especially just a stone's throw from Chancellors.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 25/Jan/2022 11:00:35

    STP_2266 Statue of Sir John Grey, GPO and Nelson Pillar in background shows the pre-1893 Georgian buildings.

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    O Mac

    • 25/Jan/2022 11:00:58

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] Overhead wires from July 1898 flic.kr/p/2mZ7EKf

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    Niall McAuley

    • 25/Jan/2022 11:10:50

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] snap! just updated my earlier comment.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 25/Jan/2022 11:15:09

    Yet another angle in L_ROY_04815, looks like a similar date.

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    John Spooner

    • 25/Jan/2022 11:16:54

    A description in Irish Society (Dublin) published on Saturday 20 August 1892. Not only an 'American elevator', but each room had a telephone to communicate with servants. I'm surprised such an arrangement was present as early as 1892. The Dublin Hotel Metropole has been opened to the public. There is a cry that Dublin is over-hotelled. To the task of proving that this cry is true or otherwise we will not apply ourselves; but we will say this much, that the Hotel Metropole is now one of the ornamental landmarks of the city, the most ornate building in the finest street in Europe, and a hostelry which already gives good promise that will become the resort largely of the travelling public who visit Dublin. The building is externally an imposing one, and well pleases the eye of the artistic viewers. From the drawingroom to the upper story light graceful verandahs and balconies run around the building, on to which French windows open, The main entrance to the building is in Sackville street, and it is thoroughly in keeping with the general features of the house. The jambs and lintel are formed of massive blocks of highly polished Aberdeen granite, surmounted by a beautifully carved cornice of stone. The two pairs of doors are of glazed mahogany, and space between them forms a porch that leads to the entrance hall and grand stairs. On one side there is a splendidly arranged American elevator car, which is intended to bring visitors to the upper storeys. The stairs are imposing, the balustrades being of solid mahogany with exquisitely carved newels in the corners, and on the first landing there is a large bow window of stained glass, with seats comfortably arranged round it. The paper of the walls of the entrance, stair case, and corridors is a highly relieved old gold Japanese pattern, with ivory background and crimson dado. The first floor contains the public apartments — coffee room, ladies’ drawingroom and waitingroom, smokeroom, and private sittingrooms. Adjoining the diningroom is the still room and the serving department, which are well up to date ; communicating with the kitchen underneath by means of lifts. On the upper floors are the visitors’ private sittingrooms and sleeping apartments, and the thought with which the arrangements were made is shown in the fact that each sittlngroom and bedroom has communication with the servants by telephone. The restaurant forms a principal feature of the building, and extends on the ground floor almost along the entire side of Princes street. Back and front of it there are large bow windows and a well arranged still room, service, &c. The other many arrangements are most modern, and make the hotel, beyond all question, the finest in the land and equal to most in London. The upholstery is luxurious, the provisions for the comfort of visitors perfect, and the appointments superb. About 60 persons were invited to view the hotel by Mr Robert Mitchell on Thursday. The host presided, and after luncheon congratulatory speeches were made, and Mr Mitchell was deservedly highly praised for rearing in the city such a palatial hostelry.

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    rpgvlwqt88

    • 25/Jan/2022 11:25:12

    Frenchified with a dormer roof and various rounded window embellishments per the style of the time. Other hotels in Dublin to do the same were the Shelbourne of course, the nearby Jurys Hotel College Green (demolished in the 1980s to make way for offices), the Hotel Russell (Stephens Green - demolished 1980s to make way for the offices of KPMG), the Royal Hibernian Hotel (demolished 1980s to make way for the offices of Davy Stockbrokers)

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    Niall McAuley

    • 25/Jan/2022 11:41:27

    Nearby shots in the catalogue are consistent with an 1890s date, but I can't narrow any down further. Scrolling all the way to L_ROY_04836 I find work just finishing on the 1894 Dominican Priory by the Black Abbey in Kilkenny.

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    Myrtle26

    • 25/Jan/2022 12:39:52

    There would have been no commercial reason for such a photograph before 1900, I think.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 25/Jan/2022 13:01:08

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/mosskayree We know for a fact it is before 1898 - no electric tram wires. So 1893 (hotel) to 1898 somewhere. This photostream is full of Lawrence photos by the same photographers dating back as far as 1865, for postcards, and the STP stereo views like the statue I linked above go back to 1860 (that particular one is 1879-1891 somewhere).

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    suckindeesel

    • 25/Jan/2022 13:14:10

    Date range 1892 (electric standards) - 1898 (pre tram electrification)

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    suckindeesel

    • 25/Jan/2022 13:30:41

    At no 39 we have a H. Grandy, Art Tailor Breeches Maker Military and Colonial Outfitter Together with no. 43, camp equipage, we have all the makings of an Allan Quatermain expedition to the colonies. All that’s missing is the elephant gun.

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    Myrtle26

    • 25/Jan/2022 15:43:36

    Niall McAuley. Very interesting detective work. But Tram tracks are clearly visible on the street though the angle may not show tram wires. This firm didn't work for nothing nor would it be possible and there was no logical reason to produce photograph for postcards at a time post office rules didn't allow them. I have plain post cards with pre-printed stamps showing Queen Victoria from 1898 and earlier but also have ones with photographs where the message had to be written alongside them even in 1902. It could be written beside the address from about 1903 - for inland postage only - and that ushered in the golden age of postcards. The NLI thankfully has a fine collection from Lawrence - but they are of negatives or transparencies, not of the original postcards. These were often in early colour printing, not black and white. If someone had the original postcard the Post Office Rules printed on the back would solve the issue.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 25/Jan/2022 16:22:22

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/mosskayree] The trams were horse drawn from 1871 to electrification, as in many shots on the stream, like this one of Eden Quay with a similar date range, 1891-97: Horse Trams at corner of Bachelor's Walk and O'Connell Bridge

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    rpgvlwqt88

    • 25/Jan/2022 16:30:04

    Its replacement from 1922 https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/51484639108/

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    Niall McAuley

    • 25/Jan/2022 16:33:25

    On the issue of commercial photos - the Lawrence collection at the NLI has 40,000 glass plate negatives from 1865 to 1914 of Irish views, buildings and interiors. I am sure we have seen Lawrence photos of shops selling other Lawrence images as souvenirs, will try to dig one up. And the detective work is the fun part!

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    O Mac

    • 25/Jan/2022 16:40:15

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] Even if the overhead wires were there but out of shot we should still see the poles which ran down the center of Sackville Street at this point. As seen here.. catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000045348

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    Bernard Healy

    • 25/Jan/2022 16:55:56

    If you use megazoom to look at the Easons storefront, you'll see that it reads "Late WH Smith". In 1886, Charles Eason bought out the Irish operations of WH Smith. They moved into 40 Sackville Street in 1887, per this page: easoncorporate.com/EasonHistory.html Now, that doesn't help us with dating, BUT if you visit that website you'll see that there's an old photo on it with the Eason shopfront lacking the "Late WH Smith" lettering. If anyone has a date for the photo on the Eason Website, I'd argue that our photo of the Metropole is probably earlier because Eason would only have "Late WH Smith" on his shopfront in his first few years in business. So, no direct help on the dating, but a possible avenue to narrow the date range if someone can put a date on the other photo.

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    suckindeesel

    • 25/Jan/2022 18:03:49

    Prince’s St. North is to the side of the hotel. The first building after the hotel was the Prince’s stores, a well known watering hole of the day. “U 7.21-4: Grossbooted draymen rolled barrels dullthudding out of Prince's stores and bumped them up on the brewery float. On the brewery float bumped dullthudding barrels rolled by grossbooted draymen out of Prince's stores” Ulysses The next building was The Freeman’s Journal None survived 1916, although the ‘stores’ reopened in later years as the Prince’s Bar. The www.thenuttychronicles.com/blog/mystery-photograph-locati... dates the photo as 1893

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    O Mac

    • 25/Jan/2022 18:22:01

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ I also see changes to the ground floor of the "English and Scottish Law Life Assurance" building next door to Eason's shop. Glazing between pillars in the Eason photograph but not in the above.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 25/Jan/2022 18:34:58

    Thoms might help. In L_CAB_06145 linked earlier, the hotel is finished but the pre-1892 gaslight is still there. Delany is at #36 selling Cigars. Parsons at #38, Stationers, Artists something. Seems to be posters saying "Parsons of Dawson Street"? In todays shot, Sexton is at #36 selling... china knick-knacks? 38 is branded Cafe Metropole

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    suckindeesel

    • 25/Jan/2022 18:59:09

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] Parsons is probably www.gracesguide.co.uk/Thomas_Parsons_and_Sons

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    Niall McAuley

    • 26/Jan/2022 06:12:51

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Maybe, but I think I see W&L PARSONS in that image, and the sticky posters might say J PARSONS 17a Dawson Street

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    Niall McAuley

    • 26/Jan/2022 09:15:17

    Later, coloured in and featuring a swan necked streetlight, electric tram and a motor car: O'Connell Street, Hotel Metropole

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    Niall McAuley

    • 26/Jan/2022 09:21:14

    IN 1901 and 1911 the manager was George John Capsey. Contemporary ads tell us he was "late of the Great Southern Hotel, Killarney"

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 26/Jan/2022 11:02:33

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley The coloured photo shows the Hotel Metropole letters as gold, which would not have shown up too well against the white lace ironwork. What is the pointy building behind to the right? It might just provide an 'earlier than' date.

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    suckindeesel

    • 26/Jan/2022 12:59:25

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Do you mean the buildings to the side, Prince's St,? First one is the Prince's stores, a pub. Second one is the Freeman's Journal, you can see the word 'Freemans'. Post 1916 the area behind was bought up by the Vulture of Dartry, who built the Indo offices around the corner and the printing works on the Freeman's site