Ugh(ly) building on the riverbank

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Where: Leinster, County Kilkenny, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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From the elaborate elegance of the Metropole Hotel to this industrial grade bunker on the river bank in Waterford/Kilkenny within the space of 24 hours! While Morning Mary is reasonably familiar with the view from the Quays in Waterford she does not recognise this one. Perhaps when it was finished it changed from a pigs ear into a pearl????

Photographer: A. H. Poole

Collection: Poole Photographic Studio, Waterford

Date: August 1905

NLI Ref: POOLEIMP 1310

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie


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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 5395
ahpoole arthurhenripoole poolecollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland ferrybank waterford kilkenny riversuir brutalism

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    Niall McAuley

    • 26/Jan/2022 08:58:47

    Stil there, still ugly: Streetview I stand corrected, that streetview is from 2017, and the NIAH says it was demolished in 2018. Also this note: The grain store or warehouse was occupied by pro-Treaty forces during the Civil War (1922-3) and the uppermost floors carry scars from bullets shot by anti-Treaty forces stationed on the South Quays.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 26/Jan/2022 09:06:08

    Compare the streetview looking South from Dock road in 2014 to 2021.

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    soilse

    • 26/Jan/2022 09:07:54

    Probably a warehouse. It has quite a modern look to it.

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 26/Jan/2022 09:34:53

    There was mention of the R&H Halls flour mills a while back; early use of the Hennebique ferro-concrete system of prefabrication in Ireland - [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/46623553874/] en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fran%c3%a7ois_Hennebique

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    Niall McAuley

    • 26/Jan/2022 09:38:46

    Designed by William Friel, he has a page at the DIA. Small entry for this R&H Hall Granary Warehouse here. His is just 27 in the 1901 census, and living at his parents place along with 2 brothers and 2 sisters. Father a bank manager of the Provincial Bank.

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 26/Jan/2022 09:57:54

    The mill got much bigger and fuglier; so fugly it was beautiful. In 2014 via https://www.flickr.com/photos/bobjacques/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/bobjacques/14599891208/ And demolition in May 2018 via https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/49859377436/

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 26/Jan/2022 10:10:12

    What goes up must come down! - youtu.be/I5iffet-quU (As the actress said to the Bishop)

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    John Spooner

    • 26/Jan/2022 11:25:58

    The lengthy description of the new grain warehouse published in the Waterford Standard on Saturday 28 October 1905 made no aesthetic judgement, but stressed what advanced technology was involved - "the first building of its kind in Ireland", especially the virtues of the "Hennebique" system of ferro-concrete, the "most modern electrical machinery" (the warehouse had its own power-house), and "the first wharf of its kind in Ireland". Very similar to Weaver's Mill in Swansea (built in the late 1890s, also using Hennebique ferro-concrete), near the mouth of the Tawe. At the time it was due for demolition to make way for a Sainsbury's, I was working on the 9th floor of an office building overlooking the site. Several attempts to demolish it failed - a clue that it might be difficult was that it was still standing after WW2 when the rest of the area had been flattened in the Blitz. The story of Swansea's 'indestructible' concrete eyesore "Either an important piece of industrial archaeology - or a dreadful eyesore" probably applies to Hall's grain warehouse as well.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 26/Jan/2022 11:41:04

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley I wonder if Friel is one of the men in the photo?

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    John Spooner

    • 26/Jan/2022 11:47:08

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Or perhaps the Clerk of Works Mr James Maher, who gave the Waterford Standard reporter the guided tour in October 1905.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 26/Jan/2022 12:17:38

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland In megazoom, most of the men are in flat caps and open necked shirts - builders. But the two men at the bottom of the ladders in the centre are wearing jacket and tie, bowler hats, and carrying plans. Bosses of some sort.

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    John Spooner

    • 26/Jan/2022 12:22:46

    James Maher in the 1901 census, aged 39, Clerk of Works, living in Dock Street with wife and 5 children (one of whom was born in Australia c 1892) ETA: James and Isabella Maher, with daughters Anna and little Pauline, sailed from Sydney to Southampton on the SS Habsburg, arriving on 19th May 1893.

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 26/Jan/2022 19:47:31

    The insouciant stance of that fellow on the left leaning against the extremely long ladder looks very Australian ... There is an earlier photo (30/01/1905) with a better view of the builders and their distinguishing hats and suits, all posing for Mr Poole's camera. Only at level 3, and showing cranes, iron bars, and extensive wooden formwork - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000038022 There are several more undigitized photos in the NLI catalogue which probably are a valuable record of this historic, if unloved, building.