Jammy times at the Jammet Hotel

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Where: Leinster, Dublin City, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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From the overstated elegance of the Metropole Hotel on Monday we move to the understated comfort of the Jammet Hotel on "Sraid Andreais Naomha" in Dublin's city centre.
Congratulations on yesterdays work, it was a rollercoaster watching the family tale unravel and wonderful to find out so much about a handsome family!

Photographer: Fergus O’Connor

Collection: Fergus O'Connor Collection

Date: Possibly 1900-1920

NLI Ref: OCO 327

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 4435
ferguso’connor ferguso’connorcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland jammethotel standrewsstreet dublin hotelandrestaurant buffet waiters collegegreen churchlane suffolkstreet

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  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 28/Jan/2022 08:57:22

    Looks like one for the no longer standing album. Here, I reckon: goo.gl/maps/sobwpynQejbBxs1Y9

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    John Spooner

    • 28/Jan/2022 08:59:00

    Opened 6th March 1901 as the Jammet Hotel, formerly the Burlington Restaurant. (advert in Dublin Evening Mail - Saturday 02 March 1901) "The only French restaurant in Dublin" - advert in Irish Times - Thursday 13 June 1901.

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    John Spooner

    • 28/Jan/2022 09:08:24

    Proprietor(?) was Mr. Louis (or Jammet (or should that be M. Louis Jammet?), who gave evidence at the inquest of Mr. Thomas Doyle and Mrs. Elizabeth Doyle. Mr. Doyle had worked at the hotel for 12 or 13 years. (Dublin Daily Express - Tuesday 15 August 1916)

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    derangedlemur

    • 28/Jan/2022 09:10:53

    It has it's own wikipedia entry! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jammet_Restaurant

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    John Spooner

    • 28/Jan/2022 09:11:39

    Louis Jammet in the DIctionary of Irish Biography This says the proprietor was his dad Michel Jammet until 1927, when Louis took over.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 28/Jan/2022 09:15:09

    We mentioned this shot before when discussing the King Billy shot below. I think this means it is on this corner rather than the Lemurs? Streetview Good King Billy

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    Niall McAuley

    • 28/Jan/2022 09:19:00

    BLOOM (Blows.) Providential you came on the scene. You have a car?. CORNY KELLEHER (Laughs, pointing his thumb over his right shoulder to the car brought up against the scaffolding.) Two commercials that were standing fizz in Jammet's. Like princes, faith. One of them lost two quid on the race. Drowning his grief and were on for a go with the jolly girls. So I landed them up on Behan's car and down to nighttown.

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    derangedlemur

    • 28/Jan/2022 09:20:49

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley That building dates back to 1867, according to Archiseek, so I don't think Jammet's was there. Mind you, the wikipedia entry says 26/27 Andrew's street, which is that corner. Something doesn't add up.

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    John Spooner

    • 28/Jan/2022 09:23:41

    Belfast News-Letter - Wednesday 21 August 1918

    An outbreak of fire was discovered yesterday morning at Jammet’s Hotel, 26 and 27, St. Andrew Street, Dublin. Two sections the brigade turned out. and after hour’s strenuous work the firemen had the outbreak, which originated in an apartment on the second floor, under control. Some alarm was caused to the inmates the hotel, many of whom rushed into the street in their night attire
    Edit: not quite the "excitement and semi nudity" of the "ladies and female domestics" who fled the Queenstown fire in 1899. Queenstown, where soldiers found a home, and sailors their rest

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    Niall McAuley

    • 28/Jan/2022 09:24:33

    Of the Bank building on that corner, the NIAH says: The south elevation to St. Andrew Street was added in 1925-8 by Ralph Byrne.

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    derangedlemur

    • 28/Jan/2022 09:26:05

    Ah. That would account for it. It's still no longer standing.

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    derangedlemur

    • 28/Jan/2022 09:28:28

    And right enough, the squiggly bits at the edge match the façade of the bank on Church Lane.

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 28/Jan/2022 09:39:22

    Via Trove, a Cautionary Tale in verse from 1907, with a mention of Jammet's - trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/166743987?searchTerm=j...

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 28/Jan/2022 09:49:09

    You could not make this up! An Australian impersonates Hitler in Jammet's in 1945 - trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/248499961 (After the 1926 move to Nassau Street, so not this building, but it's a good yarn)

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 28/Jan/2022 10:23:58

    And Jammet's features (on the second page) in this Ripping Yarn about an Australian smuggling £35,000 from America to Michael Collins, published in 1922 - trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/76201235?searchTerm=ja... A CLOSE CALL. Miceai could never be got to see it in that light. His reckless daring took no count of consequences. Four of us were dining one day at Jammet's Hotel. Jammet's is the Dublin edition of a well-known Parisian restaurant of the same name and ownership. Of the party was a Mr. Foley. In the middle of the proceedings there was an entry of Black and Tans and we were all covered by revolvers. Foley was taken and the three of us were left. That it was Foley's end was taken for granted. After the lapse of half-an-hour and whilst we were still sitting there stunned by the blow, Miceal Collins entered the room and sat down beside us. "There was an official at the Castle, a friend of mine," he said with a twinkle in his eye, "He told them that I was only a Mr. Foley, a perfectly harmless and respectable friend of his." Foley was one of Miceal's aliases. ...

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    rpgvlwqt88

    • 28/Jan/2022 11:20:43

    Building replaced by the Hibernian Bank Ltd offices built by G&T Crampton c1925-1928. digital.ucd.ie/view/ucdlib:46916

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    O Mac

    • 28/Jan/2022 11:33:52

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] is right. Jammet's was on the corner of St Andrews Street and Church lane facing St Andrews Church. It's side entrance was where the white car is parked in this Street view. maps.app.goo.gl/MgofETAm75zqbNji6

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    Niall McAuley

    • 28/Jan/2022 16:08:00

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Well actually, I believe you will find that the white veh-hickle is a van, not a car. 😄

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 28/Jan/2022 19:53:07

    Date? They opened 06/03/1901. A few years after that? And those three chefs are Michel, Francois (who went back to France in 1908) + ? See family history - www.youwho.ie/jammet.html

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    Niall McAuley

    • 29/Jan/2022 06:10:24

    Michel and Josephine Jammet on Andrew Street in the 1901 census with son Louis, four barmaids, two book keepers, a cashier and a servant. Francois and Loisel with son Hippolyte. In Dun Laoghaire, Kathleen and Jeanne are 11, in the Dominican Convent school.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 29/Jan/2022 06:15:08

    The business seemed to require a lot of book-keepers, the badly spelled 1911 form has 3 of them. Catherine (not Kathleen) is 21. She got married in the other St. Andrew's church, Westland Row, in 1910. Louis was a witness.

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    DaithiDePaor

    • 30/Jan/2022 12:36:06

    Were there two Jammets then? I always thought the premises was later the Berni Inn / Judge Roy Bean's / Porterhouse. www.irishtimes.com/life-and-style/people/jammet-s-a-dubli...

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    Niall McAuley

    • 30/Jan/2022 15:39:08

    yes, they moved to Nassau St in 1925 when the Bank extended into Andrew st