Aberdeen and Geesala sharing a moment

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Where: Connaught, County Mayo, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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Lord and Lady Aberdeen with a nurse outside a house in Geesala outside Ballina, in Co. Mayo. When you think about how this island seems heavily populated with 4/5 million people it must have been crammed with 8 million by the start of the famine. Conditions must have been dire for the poor and though I may be wrong, the Congested Districts Boards were an attempt to raise the standard of housing and health care. It would seem that the Aberdeens were ardent supporters of the Board? Lady Aberdeen appears to be impressed with the nurses wasp waist!

Photographers: Unknown

Main creator: Robert John Wellch 1859 - 1936

Collection: The Congested Districts Board Photographic Collection

Date: ca. 1905 -1915

NLI Ref: CDB56

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 5419
nationallibraryofireland nationalphotographicarchive congesteddistrictsboardcollection lordandladyaberdeen nurse cottage geesala ballina comayo connacht

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  • profile

    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 01/Mar/2022 08:41:03

    ?? Streetview - goo.gl/maps/G3QzCCfT4AD6dFZF8 ?? [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia/51911235601/in/dateposted/]

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 01/Mar/2022 08:55:46

    John Hamilton-Gordon, 1st Marquess of Aberdeen and Temair, was Lord Lieutenant of Ireland in 1886, and 1905-1915 (ahem @ dates above!) - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Hamilton-Gordon,_1st_Marquess_... She was called Ishbel.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 01/Mar/2022 09:09:20

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Date, updated!

  • profile

    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 01/Mar/2022 09:18:16

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Thanks. It looks slightly earlier than the 1960s.

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 01/Mar/2022 09:52:58

    You could not make this up. Lord Aberdeen wrote a book of jokes in 1929. Described as "bafflingly unfunny", it has achieved cult status and was recently (2013) republished. A sample - He couldn't say! A lady remarked to a former bishop of London on one occasion "Oh! Bishop, I want to tell you something very remarkable. An aunt of mine had arranged to make a voyage in a certain steamer, but at the last moment she had to give up the trip; and that steamer was wrecked; wasn't it a mercy she did not go in it?" "Well, but," replied the bishop, "I don't know your aunt." From - www.theguardian.com/books/2013/oct/03/jokes-cracked-lord-...

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 01/Mar/2022 09:56:46

    We have been introduced previously, in 1914 - https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/8475884334/

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Mar/2022 10:04:16

    There is one Nurse in Gweesalia in 1911: Rose Winfield, Hospital Nurse. Lives in a house with 2 windows to the front.

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 01/Mar/2022 10:12:40

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley ... with seven six birds on top?

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Mar/2022 10:22:55

    The nurse is in house 7 in the census - next door in #6 is a Lace teacher Rose Ann McSherry. I don't see either herself or any nurse in 1901 - maybe both were brought in by the CDB?

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    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Mar/2022 10:45:01

    As well as the lace teacher, there are 4 young women listed as Lace Makers in 1911, none in 1901. Sounds like the CDB in action to me.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Mar/2022 10:54:19

    Looking at the 1901 census, I don't see this house at all. I think the house is new between 1901 and 1911, and that this nurse is very likely Rose Winfield.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Mar/2022 11:23:06

    Lady Dudley’s District Nursing Scheme and the Congested Districts Board, 1903–1923 Table 8.1 Location and Year in Which the CDB Houses Were Built Location of CDB House County Year Geesala, Ballycroy Mayo 1904

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 01/Mar/2022 12:33:18

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Great Job.

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    oursonpolaire

    • 01/Mar/2022 13:12:33

    When Aberdeen was Governor General of Canada, Lady Aberdeen built a reputation as a social reformer, founding the National Council of Women in Canada, and pushing for votes for women. She also helped establish the Victorian Order of Nurses, intended to provide medical care in remote areas where doctors were few and far between.

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    John Spooner

    • 02/Mar/2022 08:53:49

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley A bit late to the party, but the Dublin Daily Express reported on Saturday 14 July 1906

    Their Excellencies the Lord Lieutenant and the Countess of Aberdeen, attended by ?Lord Herschell and Captain the Hon. A. H???-Ruthven, and accompanied Mr. W. L Walker, motored yesterday morning to Ballycroy,
    After meeting Nurse Trinham there, they visited the Lace School, took the Ulligham Ferry to Doonhooma, had lunch with Father Hegarty and Father Dolphin. Then:
    Their Excellencies then proceeded to Bangor via Geesala, where an address was presented on behalf of the people of the district, and a visit paid to Nurse Farrelly
    So I'd tentatively suggest that the picture was taken on Friday 13th July 1905 in the early afternoon, and the nurse is Nurse Farrelly. the report is on the edge of the page, and some text on the extreme edge isn't clear, hence the question marks

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 02/Mar/2022 09:27:58

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Good find! I don't see a likely Nurse Farrelly in the 1911 census, I wonder if she got married. There are lots of Nurse Farrells...

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    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 02/Mar/2022 10:49:47

    Do the dimensions of the glass suggest any time limitations? When did such large panes become commonplace?

  • profile

    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 02/Mar/2022 11:29:20

    Aside Window history is a pane in the glass !

  • profile

    moccasinlanding

    • 06/Mar/2022 20:33:42

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia The windows and door surrounds are straight across in your photo, beachcomber, and not curved at the top as in the original posted photo. Just a note of dissimilar construction.

  • profile

    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 07/Mar/2022 06:41:13

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/moccasinlanding Thank you; I am well aware of various differences. That is why I put four question marks on my streetview link. If anyone can find a better likeness in Geesala, please post it.

  • profile

    moccasinlanding

    • 07/Mar/2022 12:56:20

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Yes, it is puzzling, so very similar, and I question how likely it is for someone to remodel just the window surrounds in the years following original construction. I am always fascinated by the degree of deductionn exhibited by the "regulars" on this forum. I am a big fan.💕

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 07/Apr/2022 11:08:53

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ I have the answer. There’s an article in the Western People 25 Aug 1906 mourning Nurse Farrelly’s (no Christian name) departure from Geesala after just 5 weeks service. We are told: “She resigns to assume the more onerous and more responsible duties of wifehood.” and indicates that she was heading to Kerry. An article in the Freeman’s Journal of 8 Aug 1906 lists all 14 nurses part of Lady Dudley’s District Nurse scheme which includes Nurse Farrelly in Killorglin, Co. Kerry. That info was a few weeks out of date as she had already reported to Geesala, but it explains how she might have formed an attachment to a Kerry fiancé. I can’t find a marriage record for her in Kerry, though.

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 07/Apr/2022 11:17:24

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] This Cork wedding of Margaret Farrelly (Trim) & Denis Mangan, Merchant (Killorglin) civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/churchrecords/images/marri...

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    Niall McAuley

    • 07/Apr/2022 12:11:16

    Denis and Margaret in 1911 with their 3 sons and 3 servants including 2 nurses (!): www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Kerry/Killorgli...

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 07/Apr/2022 13:03:39

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] I wonder if this is the same Mangan: www.deveres.ie/art/john-doherty-john-denis-mangans-shop-k...

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    Niall McAuley

    • 07/Apr/2022 13:07:41

    That census record shows that Denis and Margaret had sons John, Thomas John and Denis John. The shopfront might be John and Denis Jnr's shop.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 07/Apr/2022 13:12:08

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy] In this Streetview from 2011, the building pictured there is called Mangan House.

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 07/Apr/2022 13:22:05

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] Here’s Margaret’s death certificate from 1922. civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/churchrecords/images/death...

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 07/Apr/2022 13:23:28

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] And Denis died in 1926 civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/churchrecords/images/death...

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 07/Apr/2022 13:29:38

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy Both death certs give address as Clifton Killorglin, which I think is Clifton Cottage on the 25", just South of the town, and still standing.

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 07/Apr/2022 17:22:26

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ It looks bigger than a cottage! I see it called Clifton Lodge in some sources. I think you’re right in identifying it.