CLONANEESE WILL NOT SURRENDER

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Where: N Ireland, Mid Ulster, UK

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When: Unknown

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Wherever Clonaneese may be they will not be surrendering any day soon! Walker's Pulpit Castlecaulfield, Co. Tyrone is a reminder of former conflicts, deaths, evacuations and refugees close to home. We continue to remember our history while never learning from it! Who was Walker and what does that little scene look like now?

Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Circa 1865 - 1914

NLI Ref: L_CAB_02485

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 3972
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio thelawrencephotographcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland castlecaulfield countytyrone ulster northernireland walkerspulpit clonaneesenosurrender banner church

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  • profile

    RETRO STU

    • 01/Apr/2022 07:57:20

    That loose carpet looks like a slip hazard.

  • profile

    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 01/Apr/2022 07:57:25

    Glückwunsch zu Explore ! 1 April 2022 was a Friday ...

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 01/Apr/2022 08:00:16

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia And a very happy Christmas to you too!

  • profile

    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 01/Apr/2022 08:09:06

    Before 1909 ... "...The original pulpit (Walker’s pulpit) was removed at this time, to the Methodist Church in the Village. In St Michael’s it stood on long legs, but these being superflous in the Methodist building they were removed by the Orangemen of the village and used to construct a chair for the Worshipful Master. Both the chair and also the pulpit are now in the Black Hall in the village. ..." From - castlecaulfield.wordpress.com/history/

  • profile

    Foxglove

    • 01/Apr/2022 08:11:39

    rev George Walker, in 1690s was defender of Derry and later died at the battle of the Boyne. Linked to the Black Institution

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    suckindeesel

    • 01/Apr/2022 08:53:31

    We had his pillar earlier https://flic.kr/p/2i2kvZY

  • profile

    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 01/Apr/2022 08:59:45

    Hmmm ... having second thoughts; are there windows like that in St Michael's? catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000338226 catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000338227

  • profile

    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 01/Apr/2022 09:18:39

    From - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Walker_(soldier) Challenge for photoshoppers - put him back in his pulpit ...

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 01/Apr/2022 10:12:48

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Carpets by Poole!

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 01/Apr/2022 16:19:32

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Based purely on looks, I’d say the picture looks more like a Methodist chapel than a CoI church.

  • profile

    Seoirse Ó Dúic - an duine Phléimeanach

    • 01/Apr/2022 18:30:50

    The Methodist chapel in Castlecaulfield, Co. Tyrone, where Walker's Pulpit was moved. Clonaleese has no LOL I'm aware of, but is very much an Ulster Presbyterian village. The area known as Clonaneese is situated midway between Dungannon and Ballygawley in County Tyrone, Northern Ireland. The 1609 Bodley map shows 27 townlands there. One of these townlands, Killeeshil, gave its name to the parish which covers the most of Clonaneese. The Clonaneese name was used for the Poor Law Union and the electoral district, but is mainly associated with the two Presbyterian congregations, Lower and Upper Clonaneese. The first Presbyterians in the Clonaneese area worshipped in the Parish Church in Killeeshil. In 1617 the Rev Robert Hamilton, a Scottish Presbyterian, was installed as rector. He did not conduct the services according to the rituals of the Anglican Church and was ejected for this non-conformity in 1622. The Presbyterians built a small mud house in the townland of Innish, commonly called the "Clabber House", to meet for worship. In 1728 they applied for a Minister of their own and supplies of preaching were granted. In 1743 they rented land from the Earl of Charlemont and built a new meeting house the next year, 1744. Some years later, a mill race was dug within a few feet off the meeting house and this caused flooding. So in 1788 money was raised to raise the building, which was built in a hollow beside the Oona Water. When the money was raised the minister and a majority of the Congregation decided to build a new meeting house on higher ground. Many others objected, saying they did not want to be "removed from their ancient seat". The new meeting house was built while the others remained, both called themselves Clonaneese, but in 1809 they were in the Presbyteries of Upper and Lower Tyrone, and as geographically the upper and lower names suited they have been officially known as this since. In 2009 the Killeeshil and Clonaneese Historical Society was formed, bringing together the names by which this area is known, and the people of Killeeshil and Clonaneese. Various community events have taken place and one of the highlights was being the subject of a Lesser Spotted Ulster program on UTV

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    Seoirse Ó Dúic - an duine Phléimeanach

    • 01/Apr/2022 18:34:40

    George Walker (c.1645 – 1 July 1690 Old Style) was an English soldier and Anglican priest. He was joint Governor of Londonderry during the Siege in 1689. He was killed at the Battle of the Boyne while going to the aid of the wounded Duke of Schomberg. He became rector of the Parish of Donaghmore in 1674, to which Castlecualfiedl belongs as well. He was also made rector of the Parishes of Lessan (or Lissan) and Desertlyn, in the Church of Ireland Diocese of Armagh. A Doctor of Divinity, Walker was joint Governor of Londonderry along with Robert Lundy during the Siege of Derry in 1689, and received the thanks of the House of Commons for his work. He was killed at the Battle of the Boyne on 1 July 1690 (12 July New Style), whilst going to the aid of Frederick Schomberg, 1st Duke of Schomberg, Commander-in-Chief of all Williamite forces in Ireland, who was wounded during the crossing of the river in the early part of the battle. He was originally buried at the battlefield but at the insistence of his widow, his body was later exhumed and buried inside the church at Castlecaufield, County Tyrone. His body was later rediscovered and re-interred next to that of his wife but not before a cast was taken of his skull. The Walker Plinth on the Londonderry city walls which was completed in 1828, remains in his memory; although the column that stood on the plinth was destroyed in an IRA bomb attack in 1973.

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    John Spooner

    • 02/Apr/2022 14:18:06

    Given that my grandmother was a Walker, and Scottish, and that Ulster Protestants are largely of Scottish origin, I wondered if I was related. So I did a little delving, and the answer is yes, but no. According to wikitree.com, he is my grandmothers's sister's son's wife's mother's mother's sister's son's wife's father's mother's father's father's father's mother's mother's brother's son's wife's mother's mother's mother's father's brother. connection (1) There is a connection, but only through several marriages, and the Walker surname is a coincidence. So he isn't Uncle George. wikitree.com has also revealed that I have connections (relationship is putting it too strongly) to Donald Trump, Jimi Hendrix, Eleanor of Aquitaine, and many many others. And you probably do too.

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 02/Apr/2022 20:28:54

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Hilarious!

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 03/Apr/2022 22:09:01

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Slightly more than the “six-degrees-of-separation” theory

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 04/Apr/2022 06:29:46

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Family is Family!

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    John Spooner

    • 04/Apr/2022 10:32:53

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland It tickled me that I have a connection to both Martin Luther (32 degrees) and Martin Luther King (28 degrees). And that they therefore have a connection to each other (25 degrees).