Airship Wreck - Appalling Disaster

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Where: Leinster, Dublin City, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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The darned cataloguers in the NLI have been at it again! The title on this O'Connor photograph is Street scene, possibly in Dublin and clearly it is in Dublin and pretty much identifiable as being on the South Side! It is somehow familiar and we have a feeling that it was here before or somewhere very close but it is such a fine shot it deserves another airing!


Photographer: Fergus O’Connor

Collection: Fergus O'Connor Collection

Date: Between 1900 - 1920

NLI Ref: OCO 118

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 3890
ferguso’connor ferguso’connorcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland streetscene dublin codublin leinster donnybrook donnybrookvillage black white blackandwhite

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  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Apr/2022 07:58:29

    Dalkey or Donnybrook?

  • profile

    aidanhodson

    • 06/Apr/2022 08:01:56

    A list of airship accidents on Wikipedia shows that a German Zeppelin crashed on 17 Oct 1913 with all 28 on board killed

  • profile

    aidanhodson

    • 06/Apr/2022 08:02:21

    en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_airship_accidents

  • profile

    JohnMcK_A68

    • 06/Apr/2022 08:05:53

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Blackrock?

  • profile

    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 06/Apr/2022 08:06:29

    !! uv ajed desreveR https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/16202791867/

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 06/Apr/2022 08:07:47

    I reckon we've had this picture before. www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/16202791867/ Edit: Looks like I'm not the only one thinks so. Though actually, the writing is the right way round on both of them, so they're not mirrors of each other. It's from the other end of the street.

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 06/Apr/2022 08:11:51

    Changed a lot since. maps.app.goo.gl/ceKaV9WBaTBGHJgTA

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    Swordscookie

    • 06/Apr/2022 08:33:45

    It's a cracker of a street scene with some lovely detail. Is it a mis-labelled Lawrence? One thing that struck me was the "Corner boy" - the man standing idling on the corner on the right! You don't see people standing around like that any more. Unless they're drug dealers or whatever:-(

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 06/Apr/2022 08:39:22

    I'm not finding any of the business owners in the 1911 census. Are there any later airship disasters that fit? Edit: Though I see we managed to match a few up in the reverse shot.

  • profile

    edwardnewton152

    • 06/Apr/2022 08:56:22

    This is an excellent Black and white Photo. Seen in Black & White Unlimited (pool) Your photo deserves a compliment from the special fish!!! compliment copy Please be sure your photo is TAGGED "Black & White" Black and White unlimited (pool) post 1 comment 2

  • profile

    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 06/Apr/2022 09:01:29

    Disaster happened 17/10/1913, so this is likely the following day? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johannisthal_air_disaster Via www.flickr.com/photos/library_of_congress/ www.flickr.com/photos/library_of_congress/4525449909/

  • profile

    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 06/Apr/2022 09:04:08

    18 October 1913 was a Saturday ...

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 06/Apr/2022 09:13:14

    Grisly details via Trove, originally from the London Times - trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/229348865 Edit - CGI - youtu.be/cyXa0DTAz3E (spoiler - it does not crash)

  • profile

    Foxglove

    • 06/Apr/2022 09:38:07

    aha ! I'm late in but I spot a dog 🐕

  • profile

    Foxglove

    • 06/Apr/2022 09:39:16

    also love the term "corner boy" - my father used the term...

  • profile

    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 06/Apr/2022 09:53:54

    £1000 for a bar of Sunlight soap is a bit much, even by 1913 prices! https://www.flickr.com/photos/atoach/21553322353/via https://www.flickr.com/photos/atoach/

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Apr/2022 10:06:00

    Below Airship Disaster on the Freemans poster is Labour Crisis - October 1913 was the middle of the Dublin Lockout, Larkin was sentenced to 7 months on October 27th, same day as the Zeppelin crash. Wait, I see the date should be 17 Oct for the Zeppelin, not 27. Let's have another look.

  • profile

    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 06/Apr/2022 10:50:40

    Definitely Donnybrook

  • profile

    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 06/Apr/2022 10:58:09

    goo.gl/maps/U9Ev1fEp8aoaDu429. Notice the Arch on the gable wall above the Advert hoarding. (and cornerboy too)

  • profile

    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 06/Apr/2022 11:04:36

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie corner boy still there in Streetview

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 06/Apr/2022 11:15:36

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Grisly details: I attended a lecture at the UK National Archives a few years ago by someone who had written an exhaustive 3-volume history of airships in WW1. When the Royal Flying Corps had worked out how to shoot them down using incendiaries in late 1916, their days were numbered, and a steward at the officers' mess at their base had reported overhearing a debate amongst the Zepellin officers as to what they should do when (not if) their airship was hit: stay put and burn to death, or jump out to a certain death when they hit the ground. As it happens, the edition of the Irish Evening Times on 18th October 1913 which reported - the airship disaster, and also - horse racing at Thirsk and Alexandra Park - the Dublin FIre ("Oil Store Conflagration: Lake of Fire in Roadway") at the premises of Messrs Brooks, Thomas & Co in Potters Lane off Marlborough Street, - the trial resulting from the strike riots, - also reported on an experimental parachute jump from an airship at Farnborough by a Major G M Maitland. The parachute itself landed in the deep water of Cove reservoir, but such was the violent swaying that Major Maitland landed in the shallow water at the edge. I wonder why parachutes hadn't been developed for use by airship crew in 1916.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 06/Apr/2022 13:20:47

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Parachutes were in use by observation balloon crews by then; They were the first widespread users, a couple of years before pilots. The theory with pilots was that they'd abandon their machines unnecessarily if they had a parachute, though subsequent events showed that pilots disproportionately stay recklessly with their plane and try to bring it home rather than jump.

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 06/Apr/2022 15:15:35

    ‘Eadie fittings’ were manufactured by Eadie www.gracesguide.co.uk/Eadie_Manufacturing_Co who made their own bikes but you could order a custom made bike through the trade using their components. Later made the Royal Enfield brand and was taken over by BSA in 1907, hence the advertisement. [https://www.flickr.com/photos/oldadman/51930501060/] via Jim Goodyear

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 06/Apr/2022 15:40:39

    I see an AOH club in the distance, or as Jim Larkin called it the "Ancient Order of Catholic Orangemen".

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 06/Apr/2022 19:32:23

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] The grandson of our original Corner Boy I expect:-)

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 06/Apr/2022 20:47:33

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Thanks, I wondered if it was something like that. The first newspaper references to parachutes were in 1784, when one of the Montgolfier brothers threw a sheep 6 times from a 100-foot tower, and "with the aid of a machine called a parachute" the animal came to no harm. Next off the tower was a long-term convict, who also survived, viewed by several thousand spectators. He was rewarded with his liberty. "The machine, we hear, is in many respects similar to an umbrella." (Hibernian Journal; or, Chronicle of Liberty - Friday 12 November 1784)