Cutting through stone like a hot knife through butter!

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Some years ago in Egypt on the Nile I saw an abandoned lump of stone with cuts along a line that were from several thousand years ago. Now, in 1928, here we had a stone cutting machine that could do that in a fraction of the time! Mind you, there's no shortage of hard labour about either!!!

Photographer: A. H. Poole

Collection: Poole Photographic Studio, Waterford

Date: 16th May 1928

NLI Ref: POOLEWP 3501

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie


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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 4226
ahpoole arthurhenripoole poolecollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland stonecuttingmachine quarry mrjephson black white ki1122

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    Swordscookie

    • 07/Apr/2022 08:18:24

    First sight of this would tell me that it is a Stone Crushing machine rather than a stone cutting machine. The mound of gravel and the mound of dust would seem to indicate that it is a crusher. On top of that it seems to be a long way from any significant rock face where you would expect cutting to take place?

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    John Spooner

    • 07/Apr/2022 08:18:43

    I don't know how relevant it is to this picture, but on 6th June 1928, three weeks after it was taken, the following appeared in the Waterford Standard

    INTERESTING QUARRYING EXPERIMENTS. Interesting experiments with new machine which drills through limestone by means or compressed air have been made by Mr. J. E. Bowen, B.E., County Surveyor, Waterford. By its use holes were drilled to a depth of 25 feet in the solid rock in 40 minutes, only two men being engaged at the engine. Gelignite was then inserted, and it is calculated that in one explosion there was quarried up 6,000 tons of limestone, all broken into different sized blocks. Mr. Bowen believes the machine will be most valuable in connection with road-making work in the country.

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 07/Apr/2022 08:20:26

    16 May 1928 was a Wednesday ...

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    Swordscookie

    • 07/Apr/2022 08:24:36

    In the 1911 census there are Jephsons living on the Dock Road in Waterford. George Hastings Jephson senior and junior and John Hastings Jephson were the men and probably the owner was one of those?

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    edwardnewton152

    • 07/Apr/2022 08:26:55

    This is an excellent Black and white Photo. Seen in Black & White Unlimited (pool) Your photo deserves a compliment from the special fish!!! compliment copy Please be sure your photo is TAGGED "Black & White" Black and White unlimited (pool) post 1 comment 2

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 07/Apr/2022 08:33:11

    The traction engine XI 1122, has a plate saying "County Council of Waterford" (see note).

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    Maxim Sinelshchikov

    • 07/Apr/2022 10:27:13

    Interesting Historical Photography! In fact, this is a whole story about the extraction of rubble at the beginning of the 20th century ... A small quarry (Slate? Granite?) is located behind the crusher itself. Large pieces of rock mass are blown up with gunpowder. And indeed, in order to produce destruction, it is necessary to drill a hole for laying gunpowder using the energy of compressed air and a metal rod. (Currently, these works are carried out in a similar way. Tungsten and cobalt-based hard alloys, invented in the 40s of the 20th century, are used to increase productivity) The steam engine in the foreground is used as an "energy drive" (or "mobile power plant" is the modern counterpart). With the help of high-quality leather belts, the rotational energy is transferred to the wheels of the crushed stone crusher. Large pieces of stone fall into the crusher. They are crushed into uniform building rubble. And then they are loaded onto a truck for delivery to the construction site ... The crusher can also be quickly moved to another quarry. With the exception of the steam engine in general, stone crushing technology has not changed in the past hundred years ... But the idea of ​​cutting large stone (granite and marble) massifs with the help of a “rope” (or “diamond wire cutting”) could only be realized after the 1950s with the invention of synthetic diamonds. This is currently the most advanced method for extracting commercial stone blocks. I personally am completely delighted in this photo is the steam engine. Amazing technical and engineering solution!

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 07/Apr/2022 11:13:02

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner The description of the process you referenced, could fit very well with the two men at the top of the Quarry? There must be some connection.

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    John Spooner

    • 07/Apr/2022 11:56:24

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland I wondered that. Meanwhile, at the end of 1928, the County Surveyor (presumably still Mr Bowen) produced his annual report, and one of the wettest years on record had revealed shortcomings in the drainage of the roads, including poor quality of stone used, and this had damaged the roads. To counter this, "we have opened several new quarries with a view to putting the best stone obtainable on the roads. This leads to economy in having better surfaces with less stone. Some of the stones in use now are extremely difficult to work, but are considered well worth the extra trouble and expense." (reported in Waterford Standard - Saturday 1 December 1928)

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    Maxim Sinelshchikov

    • 07/Apr/2022 12:30:26

    Yes, of course... The two men at the top are miners. They put gunpowder into the hole-borehole (Shpur is an artificial cylindrical depression in the rock) to explode the rock. After preparation, they will demand everyone to leave the danger zone and carry out an explosion... The Engineer near the steam engine is also interesting. With the help of a hose, he lubricates the working ( rubbing) rods of the steam engine with oil. And if you look at the wooden flooring, then this is the regular lubrication of many parts of the steam engine during operation. Without stopping the process of crushing stone. Also visible is a shovel for loading coal and a long hose for supplying water to the boiler of a steam engine. I specifically focus on this wooden flooring and the absence of faulty units next to the steam engine to state the following fact. This steam engine was designed and built by very Smart People. Great Mechanics! She allowed the career to work without downtime and problems.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 07/Apr/2022 13:21:01

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia I believe the reg must be KI-1127. KI was Waterford County KI 1 to KI 9999 (Jan 1904 – Mar 1961). They reached KI-155 in the 1914-15 book.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 07/Apr/2022 14:58:57

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Thank you,

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    John Spooner

    • 07/Apr/2022 20:09:08

    I assume the Wallis is John Wallis and Sons, general carriers. Seen previously here (on the side of the pale-coloured building). Plenty of mentions in the press in the 1920s, usually either because their lorries had damaged someone or something, or because a former employee was retiring or had died. The name disaappeared in 1933 following a merger with Great Southern Railways. Benediction on the Bridge

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 07/Apr/2022 20:26:06

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Ha! I should have gone to specsavers! (I also misread an "H", as previously). KI-1122 surely? Hoping to find a 'now' photo of the traction engine; meanwhile it's nicknamed 'Gromit', since the lorry is 'Wallis'.

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 07/Apr/2022 20:48:32

    Of interest - a 1920s 'Baxter' originally from Cork (without a cage drum sorter on top) - youtu.be/G2gDAoPP13k

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    silverio10

    • 07/Apr/2022 21:21:45

    Buenas fotos antiguas .

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    thelimbreaper

    • 10/Apr/2022 00:43:34

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie Agreed, from a guy who has hauled a lot of crushed stone.

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    an poc

    • 10/Apr/2022 14:07:01

    Mr Bowen, the County Surveyor, is credited with saving the road bridge at Ballyvoile after its central arch was blown up by the IRA in 1922. Bowen is second from the left in the front row of this photo: www.waterfordmuseum.ie/exhibit/web/DisplayImage/K0K0sj7aO...

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    Dr. Ilia

    • 12/Apr/2022 08:00:09

    great image