The Bay of the Squinting Window

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Where: Connaught, Galway, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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The Bay, Woodford, Co. Galway for today's image with a lady (a maid) looking out the bay window of the house on the far side of the water. The house is very close to the water and must have been vulnerable to winter/spring/summer/autumn floods? (I was going to say winter but they could happen at any time of the year in Ireland)

Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Circa 1865 - 1914

NLI Ref: L_ROY_09947

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 3297
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio thelawrencephotographcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland thebay woodford cogalway connacht

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  • profile

    Foxglove

    • 25/Apr/2022 07:21:26

    looks out the window thinking "bloody paparazzi....."

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    O Mac

    • 25/Apr/2022 07:38:15

    Street view maps.app.goo.gl/6mUKL1qJA3to8XvD6

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    O Mac

    • 25/Apr/2022 07:51:52

    This "bay" as it is still called today was a man-made mill pond for a mill that stood behind the camera above. It was demolished in the '60s.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 25/Apr/2022 08:06:57

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Built c. 1900 per that NIAH link. The 25" is from 1893, and this house is not there.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 25/Apr/2022 08:22:25

    L_ROY_09941 nearby in the catalogue and real life is nursing home, former convent, built c.1905 per the NIAH

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 25/Apr/2022 08:23:35

    Flickr is sometimes amazing. In April 2021 via https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/51121013093/

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    Niall McAuley

    • 25/Apr/2022 08:30:03

    I took a squint at the 1911 census, but I can't tell which house this is on the form. Good chance we could identify the woman in the window if we could.

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    [email protected]

    • 25/Apr/2022 08:32:50

     Realy great pic! ;-)

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 25/Apr/2022 09:08:49

    I had a hopeful hunch that this might have been the rebuild of Dr Tully's house, but no: wrong. Another wild goose chase across The Bay ... https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/6821695135

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    Foxglove

    • 25/Apr/2022 09:15:20

    there is also man in the garden, if a mill working couple it could help with ID through census ?

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    Billy Quinn 1954

    • 25/Apr/2022 09:49:16

    The Maid in Question

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    O Mac

    • 25/Apr/2022 12:25:38

    "Keary" is current owner.

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    John Spooner

    • 25/Apr/2022 13:32:08

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] A young Brian Keary won 2/6 for a "joke" published on the 'Junior Standard' page of the Catholic Standard on Friday 16 May 1958Catholic Standard - Friday 16 May 1958 To be fair to young Brian, the "joke" sent in by Joseph Bishop of Walkinstown, Dublin, wasn't any better. IMHO.

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    John Spooner

    • 25/Apr/2022 14:12:46

    I suspect the name "Woodford Bay" may have originated from a speech in parliament in August 1901, reported widely. This is from the Northern Whig on Saturday 10 August 1901

    DUBLIN. Friday Night. Apparently were some lively incidents in connection with the all-night sitting the House of Commons the 2nd and 3rd Inst., if an account published in this morning's "Independent" is relied on. The account is taken from a letter written by an Irish member to a friend in Dublin. The opening of the letter is taken up with an account Mr. John Roche's speech on the Naval Works Bill, in the course of which he complained the Admiralty were not spending anything on Woodford Bay, Woodford being a email village South County Galway, thirty miles away from the sea. According to the letter none of the English members saw that Mr. Roche was simply playing on their ignorance of Irish geography.
    Other accounts mention uproarious laughter among the Irish members, which isn't bad going given the debate began at 3 a.m. I wonder if the citizens of Woodford commemorated their part in the parliamentary joke by ironically naming the millpond after the previously fictitious body of water.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 25/Apr/2022 14:52:43

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Interesting. L_ROY_09936, nearby in the catalogue as well as geographically, shows Keary's was a shop and post office on Main Street at the time. Those Keary's are in both the 1901 and 1911 census. Streetview shows that Keary's shop is still there (although not the Post Office). There is another family of Kearys in the 1911 census, Patrick, Elizabeth and children. Patrick is a physician and surgeon, There are two servants, Katie Thompson and John Duane. Their house is 1st Class with 6 windows to the front.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 25/Apr/2022 15:05:16

    They were married in 1898, Patrick being from Woodford, father (also Patrick) a shopkeeper.

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    O Mac

    • 25/Apr/2022 15:07:00

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ John Keary had the post office up to about ten years ago. It is still a hardware shop and petrol pump. Keary's was affectionately known as 'Dear Johns' because the petrol and diesel was more expensive there than anywhere else. The Kearys who lived in the above house were related and were the local doctors... I lived and worked from Woodford when restoring the Birr telescope in the mid 90's. It's a lovely place.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 25/Apr/2022 15:14:30

    Birth records of the junior Kearys just give Woodford as the address.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 25/Apr/2022 15:34:55

    The house was built after 1893 (from the OS 25" map). The NIAH thinks c.1900, but it is not precise. The roses are 10 feet up the walls here - it is up a good few years. I'd say we are closer to the 1911 census than the 1901.

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    John Spooner

    • 25/Apr/2022 16:22:04

    The "Woodford Bay" parliamentary ploy was repeated in 1906 by a Mr Devlin. New Ross Standard - Friday 10 August 1906:

    Members who represented seaport towns had made strong appeals to the Government to remedy in some practical way these crumbing harbours. They had pointed out time after time the danger to fishermen who depended for their very existence on their work at these places. Member after member rose and appealed to the Minister, but their efforts were unsuccessful till one more earnest than the rest made A Strong Appeal on behalf of his own harbour constituency. He advised the early erection of a proper harbour at "Woodford Bay." He dwelt on the beauty of the scenery and the general resources of the place with such effect that the Minister (Mr. Austen Chaimberlain*) rose and said that he could fully bear out the honourable member, in his eloquent description of the many natural beauties of "Woodford Bay," and be could assure him that as soon as funds were available the harbour would be erected. "But, " continued Mr Devlin, "The hugeness of the joke will be apparent when I remind you that there is no such place as 'Woodford Bay' in Ireland" , (loud prolonged laughter).
    *Neville's dad

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    John Spooner

    • 25/Apr/2022 16:42:27

    As well as the 2/6 the Catholic Standard paid for his joke in 1958, Brian Keary of The Bay, Woodford pocketed a 5s prize in the Children's crossword competition in the same paper, announced in the Friday 21 May 1954 edition.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 26/Apr/2022 04:54:21

    From the Irish Times, 2003: Dr Ray Keary, who died last Monday at the age of 65, was a leading geologist and author of the first "real map" of Ireland and its extensive seabed territory. ... Ray Keary was born in Woodford, Co Galway, on August 18th, 1937, and was reared near Lough Derg on the Tipperary border. Water "both onshore and offshore" was to be an abiding them of his life, as the journal Sherkin Comment noted last year. His father worked as a doctor for Inishbofin island off the Connemara coast, and Keary would have become very familiar with the western seaboard from an early age.