Identified! [A Jenkins Television Co. worker with device to broadcast motion pictures over radio signals]

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Where: Unknown

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When: 01 January 1929

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Harris & Ewing,, photographer.

NO CAPTION

[1929 July or August]

1 negative : glass ; 4 x 5 in. or smaller

Notes:
Date based on date of negatives in same range.
Gift; Harris & Ewing, Inc. 1955.

Subjects:
United States.

Format: Glass negatives.

Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication. For more information, see Harris & Ewing Photographs - Rights and Restrictions Information www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/140_harr.html

Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

Part Of: Harris & Ewing photograph collection (DLC) 2009632509

General information about the Harris & Ewing Collection is available at hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.hec

Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/hec.35461

Call Number: LC-H2- B-3489-5

Info:

Owner: The Library of Congress
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 1427
libraryofcongress dc:identifier=httphdllocgovlocpnphec35461

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  • profile

    Richard Arthur Norton (1958- )

    • 06/May/2022 18:09:03

    It appears to be a 16mm projector.

  • profile

    ART NAHPRO

    • 06/May/2022 18:55:37

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/richardarthurnorton I think it is more than just a projector it seems to be projecting at a black spinning disk with perforations and that is directed at at an aperture in the big electronic device to the left ..maybe an ealy attmpt to transmit moving pictures electronically..like TV

  • profile

    Jon (LOC P&P)

    • 06/May/2022 19:04:41

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected], that's what I'm wondering too. Could the disk be a Nipkow disk which was used in mechanical televisions? What I still don't get is what does that part against the wall do? Is all of that to transmit the signal?

  • profile

    ART NAHPRO

    • 06/May/2022 19:06:07

    He looks rather like Philo Farnsworth the American TV pioneer and inventor although most photos show Farnsworth's hair more unkempt

  • profile

    Jon (LOC P&P)

    • 06/May/2022 19:20:38

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]], look at this newspaper photo of C. Francis Jenkins with his "television instrument": chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014519/1929-07-29/ed-.... That's the same machine as this one.

  • profile

    ART NAHPRO

    • 06/May/2022 19:33:39

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/jon_loc Oh yes definitely

  • profile

    ART NAHPRO

    • 06/May/2022 19:41:03

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/jon_loc I don't actually think the photo is of Phio Farnsworth..perhaps just a technician at the Jenkins Television Corporation

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    Jon (LOC P&P)

    • 06/May/2022 19:42:26

    And then I realize we had another photo of Jenkins with the same machine: www.loc.gov/item/2013647230/.

  • profile

    ART NAHPRO

    • 06/May/2022 19:45:09

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/jon_loc] If you scroll down this article this is a photo taken in the same room with Jenkins and another man www.1519connecticut.com/historical-photos.html probably the same one as your newspaper article

  • profile

    ART NAHPRO

    • 06/May/2022 19:52:58

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/jon_loc haha yes..the same one in the article I posted just now

  • profile

    ceebee23

    • 07/May/2022 11:06:45

    clearly a mechanical television film scanner....

  • profile

    Richard Arthur Norton (1958- )

    • 09/May/2022 13:11:39

    The process and the device is generically called a telecine, a portmanteau of television and cinema. It scans the film and converts the 24 fps of film to the 30 fps used in video transmission and alters the aspect ratio. See: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telecine

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    Jon (LOC P&P)

    • 11/May/2022 19:27:15

    I think Jenkins' television ran at 15 fps (with a resolution of 48x48).