There's a guard on the gate!

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Where: Leinster, Dublin City, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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This beautiful Imperial Plate of the castellated entrance to the Royal Hospital, Kilmainham is the subject of today's image. The sentry at the gate is a reminder that this was once a military establishment though today it's uses are very different. I'm fascinated at the stonework, almost as if the builders decided to use a patchwork pattern for effect?

Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Circa 1865 - 1914

NLI Ref: L_IMP_0613

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 4539
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio thelawrencephotographcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland theroyalhospital kilmainham dublin britishsoldiers wounded ill recovering disabled cemetery

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  • profile

    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 21/Oct/2022 07:51:09

    The patchwork stones are even more startling in colour; in 2016 via https://www.flickr.com/photos/studiaphotos/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/studiaphotos/32627448217/in/photostream/

  • profile

    Wendy:

    • 21/Oct/2022 07:52:56

    See history of Richmond gate tower

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 21/Oct/2022 08:10:51

    I suppose that’s its second location, it did move about a bit. The stone is Dublin calp limestone. maps.app.goo.gl/BRfAUrNVjFsbqZcY7?g_st=ic

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 21/Oct/2022 08:15:31

    At the NIAH: Richmond Tower was originally constructed at the junction of Watling Street and Victoria Quay, and was moved to the Royal Hospital at Kilmainham in 1847 due to traffic congestion caused by the opening of the new railway terminus at Kingsbridge, now Heuston Station. The gateway was named after the Duke of Richmond, Lord Lieutenant (1807-1813), and was designed by Francis Johnston, who was also responsible for alterations to the courtyard and north range of the main Royal Hospital building in the early years of the nineteenth century.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 21/Oct/2022 08:20:36

    I never knew it had been moved there, here is a Streetview of its original location at Watling St/The Quays as marked on the 1830s 6" OSI.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 21/Oct/2022 08:25:41

    The NIAH is missing the fact that the crenellated wall immediately North/left of the gate today is a later addition, not in this image.

  • profile

    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 21/Oct/2022 08:29:37

    There is an earlier (?) Stereo Pair with different curtains in the cottage window, leaves on the trees, and three soldiers - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000564027 ps - and a flagpole!

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 21/Oct/2022 08:45:25

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Yes, I think the STP is earlier.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 21/Oct/2022 09:06:21

    Castellated bit was there in 1962 per RTÉ

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 21/Oct/2022 09:11:27

    The DIA adds that the original builder was Frederick Darley.

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    suckindeesel

    • 21/Oct/2022 09:20:52

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ “Johnston had placed his personal coat of arms above the arch, concealed by a piece of wood painted to match the stone, his idea being that his arms would be revealed to future generations after the wood became rotten. However, this was uncovered when the gateway was taken down for removal. The current coat of arms on the gateway is that of the Royal Hospital” - Wikipedia

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    Niall McAuley

    • 21/Oct/2022 09:24:46

    Scanning back in the IMP catalogue, there are a couple of Royal Hospital shots and then an image of the Christian Union buildings on Abbey St, date from 1879 per the DIA. Look new-ish here (some lime from the red brick) but not brand new. 1880s?

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 21/Oct/2022 09:28:50

    Among cases of turbulent conduct, assault, five police complaints against public houses (all dismissed) and arson (of a hayrick in Chicken Lane ) , all heard in the Dublin police courts on Wednesday 15th October 1862 was this one

    A Disorderly Female.-Ellen Chambers was charged by Police-constable 92 E, with having yesterday, at New Kilmainham, disturbed the public peace, by kicking at the Richmond Tower, throwing stones at complainant, and threatening to knock his brains out. Bail or fourteen days' imprisonment.
    (Freeman's Journal - Thursday 16 October 1862)

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    Niall McAuley

    • 21/Oct/2022 09:35:30

    Then a fresh looking Gray statue, earliest 1879.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 21/Oct/2022 09:50:43

    I have to scan a long way forward for anything dateable, it is Queens Bridge in Belfast, 1886.

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    suckindeesel

    • 21/Oct/2022 12:51:03

    A body good at regimental uniforms? Could provide a date range

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 21/Oct/2022 16:01:57

    https://flic.kr/p/2nUhUCP c.1830 by W.H. Bartlett. Here’s our gate in its original position

  • profile

    wuffee_cem

    • 21/Oct/2022 19:14:58

    Is that LEGO?

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 21/Oct/2022 19:51:51

    Another view of original local https://flic.kr/p/2nUk738 Picturesque Ireland John Savage (1828-1888)

  • profile

    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 21/Oct/2022 19:58:11

    Aside - Art as Parking / Parking as Art - goo.gl/maps/TfUJmyYQ7JrDGGwo8

  • profile

    CASSIDY PHOTOGRAPHY

    • 22/Oct/2022 02:50:17

    Irish convicts "transported" to Van Diemen's Land and Australia by the British were master-builders of stoneworks.

  • profile

    Aidrean S

    • 24/Oct/2022 14:17:14

    The Royal Hospital Kilmainham is an iconic landmark. It was built in 1680 by royal command and predates its sister, the Royal Hospital Chelsea, by just two years. This is the oldest classical building in Ireland and was based on Les Invalides in Paris. Impressive, isn’t it? When it was built, the hospital housed just 20 people although it was designed for 400 (at times through history it housed up to 2,500). In 1690, we began looking after army pensioners from the Battle Of The Boyne. In 1922 the RHK was handed over to the Irish Free State and five years later the last pensioner was moved to Chelsea. It served as Garda Headquarters from 1930 to 1950 but fell into disrepair. In 1980 Taoiseach Charles Haughey approved plans to renovate it at a cost of IR£3 million. It took four years – which is as long as it took to originally build it three centuries before. The beautiful gardens there were originally used for medicinal purposes but over time they became the private gardens of the Master of the RHK who was in charge of the British Army in Ireland at that time. In 1991, the RHK became home to the Irish Museum of Modern Art (IMMA) which explains all of those stunning sculptures you’ll see around the hospital’s 48 acres.