Ink. Battle. House?

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Where: Leinster, County Kilkenny, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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It seems to me (I may be wrong) that the Krazy Kataloger has struck yet again and mis-transcribed Ink Battle House where it should be Ink BOTTLE House? Regardless the strange looking house must have been an oddity and cause of some chatter at the time. Does it still exist today and what does it look like now?

Photographer: Irish Tourism Association Photographer

Collection: Irish Tourism Association Photographic Collection

Date: 1942 - 1944

NLI Ref: NPA ITA 1306 (Box VI)

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 201724
irishtourismassociation irishtourism nationallibraryofireland ireland bwfilmnegatives glassnegatives anunpublisheddatabaseisavailableatnpareadingroomcounter octagonalhouse kilkenny leinster inkbottlehouse inkbattlehouse krazykataloger piltown bellinehouse

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 25/Oct/2022 07:48:02

    Flickr is sometimes amazing! In 2008 via https://www.flickr.com/photos/patduggan/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/patduggan/2344740059/

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 25/Oct/2022 07:52:26

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Beachcombers can be amazing too!

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 25/Oct/2022 08:00:03

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Evidently there is another "Ink Bottle" at Dunkerrin, Co. Offaly. In 2013 via https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/9725129283/

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 25/Oct/2022 08:06:42

    I think they are named after Victorian ink bottles, so old nicknames. Evidently they were glass sealed; you had to break the glass to use them, so surviving ones look like they are broken ?? Examples via https://www.flickr.com/photos/sarathecollector/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/sarathecollector/6905122933/

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    O Mac

    • 25/Oct/2022 08:12:42

    NIAH.... www.buildingsofireland.ie/buildings-search/building/12403... not too far from Fiddown Streetview... maps.app.goo.gl/VfvBVQDMbuHMEMZF7

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 25/Oct/2022 08:17:44

    That man and woman must be Mr and Mrs Quill.

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    O Mac

    • 25/Oct/2022 08:37:29

    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq or maybe his nibs.

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    CHG PRO PHOTOGRAPHY incorporating the APL archives

    • 25/Oct/2022 08:54:38

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Looking at the overhead view of the location of this building on Google Maps leads me to ponder if in fact we are looking at a tollbooth? It seems to me that it could be on what may have been a main road at some point not too long ago, the nearby N24 has obviously been straightened….. Similar tollbooths were constructed all over the UK at similar junctions….?

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    John Spooner

    • 25/Oct/2022 09:04:35

    Other Ink Bottle Houses: - Cockenzie, east of Edinburgh, named because of its shape according to the Edinburgh Evening News on Tuesday 12 August 1924, but the picture shows an very ordinary-looking house. - on Slug Road, 4 miles west of Stonehaven (1) scene of a grass fire in April 1990, and of (2) a car/motorcycle collision in June 1958 (no serious injuries). And (3) a policeman overturned his car there in March 1994. Had they distracted by a mysterious man? (see below) - Ardoyne, Belfast, on the route of a cross-country run in December 1929 - On the Charterhall Estate in Berwickshire, occupied by Mr & Mrs Milburn. "The house is shaped exactly like an ink bottle. The walls are round. They taper gradually to a chimney, which is the “lid” of the bottle." (described August 1955) - All over Wales. The Western Mail on Saturday 11 February 1950 said that "Ink Bottle houses could be seen all over Wales until the end of the 19th century. The name arose because the chimney was placed in the centre of the thatched circular roof. They were primitive dwellings usually constructed in one night and consisted of a singe room. " Back to the Stonehaven Slug Road bottle-house, or rather the road it was on . The Aberdeen Press and Journal of Friday 23 November 1990 ran a reported on local ghost sightings. One was of a driver seeing figure of a man in the road near the "now-ruined ink bottle house", which was not seen by his wife, but was seen by his daughter. When he stopped there was nobody there. There was also said to be a "green lady" who appeared on Slug Road from time to time. All very interesting but nothing to do with today's picture.

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 25/Oct/2022 09:25:59

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] She was called Penny.

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    Bernard Healy

    • 25/Oct/2022 09:42:52

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/apl-irl The old Ordnance Survey maps describe it as a Gate Lodge, and they probably date from when it would still have been in use.

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    Bernard Healy

    • 25/Oct/2022 09:46:27

    If you look at the photos of Belline House here www.buildingsofireland.ie/buildings-search/building/12403... there are a couple of interesting towers in a very similar style (but larger) much nearer the house itself. Incidentally, I don't want to be rude, but as a photograph, the composition and technical aptitude don't measure up to the interesting nature of the subjexct matter.

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    suckindeesel

    • 25/Oct/2022 10:05:26

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Spot on, it was a gate lodge at the extreme southwest of the original estate and matches the style of the turret gate. It's even called the 'turret' on the 25"

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    suckindeesel

    • 25/Oct/2022 10:11:58

    The NIAH might describe it as a 'pavilion tower'

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    suckindeesel

    • 25/Oct/2022 10:29:02

    We overlooked the obvious source maps.archaeology.ie/historicenvironment/?REG_NO=12403906

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    suckindeesel

    • 25/Oct/2022 15:24:00

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ I can't get the NIAH link to work but it appears to be the sole survivor of the pair of 1775 gate lodges flanking the entrance to Beline House "Originally intended as one of a pair flanking a central gateway (second in pair no longer extant) a modest-scale gate lodge identified on the Ordnance Survey as "The Turret" but more familiar in the locality as "The Inkbottle" forms a picturesque landmark at the entrance to the grounds of the Belline House estate. Robustly detailed in the Classical manner the construction of the gate lodge displays particularly fine stone masonry while refined dressings enhance the aesthetic aspirations of the composition. Although now disused the gate lodge has historically been well maintained to present an early aspect, thereby making a positive impression on the character of the locality."

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    Oretani Wildlife (Mike Grimes)

    • 27/Oct/2022 07:43:56

    Here's a gate round lodge up the road from where I grew up. They seem to have been a popular design. maps.app.goo.gl/48r8dkioEkUj8asx5

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 27/Oct/2022 08:47:07

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikeegee They may have been popular with the landowners but what were they like to live in I wonder? Those peculiar shapes could be a nightmare for the free standing furniture of that time!

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    suckindeesel

    • 13/Dec/2022 21:07:34

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] Came across the source of the Ink Bottle House photo. In appeared in the Sept ‘44 edition of ‘Irish Travel’, a magazine published by the Irish Tourist Association. arrow.tudublin.ie/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?filename=10&art... [https://flic.kr/p/2o5KmBV]